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f°4[_??f?]?!l s .±_T?Ji^f?. s . FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1999 



-ANTI 



'What we are doing now is the realization of a dream' antioch, il 60002 



TIF, taxes, and tr 




movements 
community 
life to downtown 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Village officials have 
harnessed a rich variety of 
municipal financing tools 
to create a downtown 
business area that regularly come 
close to a "no vacancy" fate. It Is an 
amazing transformation from the 
early 1980s. 

"Lots of communities like 
Antioch were suffering badly," said 
Dr.; Don Skidmore, chair of the 
Antioch Redevelopment Commis- 
sion. He said that everything was 
depressed at that time and Antioch 
was. part of it Today, the village is 
able to finance downtown improve- 
ment projects and enhance the role 
of central Antioch in community 
"life. 

The Antioch Redevelopment 
Commission meets regularly to plan 
and guide the projects that 
contribute to the economic rcyital- 
ization of the community. 

Village offidalS'tUd not just get , 
lucky. They planned what ttiey 
wanted to do and they implement- 
ed their plan". These days, village 
officials now have serendipity on 
their side. 

There are downtown improve- 
ment projects completed last 
summer that had their origins in 
1948. That is when merchants and 
property owners first wanted to 
bury utility lines to improve visual 




Today, Antloch's downtown boast a near "no vacancy'* rate. It is had many vacant storefronts. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 
an amazing transformation from the early 1980s, when Antioch ; 




riaronce. By the mid-1970s, 
consultants to the village had 
conducted studies of the downtown 
area's economic detail and physical 
conditions. In 1984, Harland 
Bartholomew & Associates issued 
"Downtown Redevelopment Plan 
and Project for die Village of 
Antioch." That study was one of the 
documents that lead to the estab-* 
lishment of a Tax Increment 
Financing District In November, 

1984. '." 

The TIF District is an economic 
success and helps provide funding 
to reinforce the turn-around in the , 
downtown area's. appearance, value 
to the community, and economic 

health. 

There were other subsequent 
planning activities. In 1991, village ' 
officials and community leaders 
created Antioch Community Action 




Please seel\F/A3 Marv 0|denburger, Don Skidmore.. 



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ACHS seeks new 

More than 100 additional students 
expected in '99; 200 more in 2000 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 




INDEX 



I, 



■ 

; GETCON^qTEp^ 



Antioch 'Community High 
School Board of Education voted 
Thursday, Feb. 4 to obtain a student 
enrollment projection to compare 
with their own update of the five year 

P ^School officials project that there 
will be 127 more' students next year 
for an expected enrollment of 1,954. 
In school year 2000-01, enrollment 
•will increase by 198 students. 

District Business Manger Bill 



Ahlers presented student enroll- 
ment, staffing needs, and financial 
projections to update the district s ' 

five-year plan. 

Ahlers characterized the changes 
in the update as not much different 
than presented in last year's five year 

plan. , , . . , 

"We're heading for that penod ot 

significant gTowfo,"~Ahlers told the 
school board officials. 

"We are going to need additional 
staff," he said ! , 

The updated report . estimates 
that staff levels will increase by six 



and eight teachers for each of those 
years respectively. 

Financial projections suggest 
that costs and revenues are in 

balance. 

"Yes, we can maintain our finan- 
cial position over these coming years 
based on some assumptions," Ahlers 
"told board officials. "If we manage 
our budget properly, we will preserve 

our funding reserve." 

The funding reserve helps school 

officials manage.year-to-year finan- 
cial fluctuations. 

Ahlers said that his evaluation of 
finances was based on three 
assumptions. He expects school 
funding to grow from property tax 
revenue 'sources. He expects the- 
district will continue to receive 



development impact fees. He 
expects no major .budget increases 
from the State of Illinois. 

Ahlers and District Superinten- 
dent Dennis Hockney requested the 
school board approve their recom- 
mendation for preparation of anoth- 
er long range projection. 

"I'd like to have another set of 
* numbers," said Hockney. "We neeo" 
at least one more set of data." ' 

Two sets of enrollment, staffing 

arid financial projections will help 

them, improve the quality of their 

decision-making, according to 

Hockney. 

The school staff was directed to 

obtain a proposal and costs for an 
P/ease see ACHS / A3 




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February 12, 1999 



FROM PAGE Al 



TIF: Village sees new life 



* 8 \ ; t . 

Now, CAN.Another element was 



to shop. Pruning all the street trees 
preparation of a downtown planning was completed last year so they will 



document by S. B. Friedman and 
Company. 

Out of these multiple activities 
came a recommended series of im- 
provement projects. Some involved 
physical improvements and others 
involved personnel hiring. 

"As more revenue was available 
(from the district), we've done more 
things," Skidmoresaid. At the pre- 
sent time, the district is providing ap- 
proximately $80,000 on an annual 
basis for economic improvement. By 
the time the TIF district Is dissolved ' 
in 2007, it may exceed the $2.0 mil- 
lion estimated revenue generation 
expected when it was established. 

"I don't think people realize the 



survive shocks associated with side- 
walk Improvements. 

In addition, downtown business- 
es have received help for improve- 
ments to their stores. These include 
The Vault Restaurant, Four Squires, 
True Value Hardware and Just Ask 
Rental, the PM&LTheater, the Las 
Vegas Restaurant, The Thrift Shop, 
and Antloch Schwinn Cyclery. The 
program helps merchants and store 
owners by reducing the cost of loans 
they secure to finance their improve- 
ments. 

"It's the TIF buy-down program 
that got the downtown revitallzation 
started with the renovation of the 
Williams Brothers building," said An- 



amount of work that has been done," tioch Community Development Di 



said Skidmore. Indeed, so much Is 
happening downtown, it may be 
hard to separate TIF-based projects 
from those that are happening 
downtown just because it is such an 
economically strong area. 

A TIF District is an economically 
distressed area. "It freezes taxes with- 
in that (area) at current levels for all 
the tax bodies," Skidmore said. 

• During the life of the district, any 
increase of sales tax and property tax 
revenue is set aside to be used for re- 
development projects. The district 
provides money for only 23 years 
and then it is dissolved. The Antioch 
TIF is one of the oldest in Illinois and 
ends in 2007. 

The district boundaries can be 
described as the following approxi- 
mate area: Main and Toft streets 
bounded onthe south just past Lake * 
Street and on the north by die school 
property and the old lumberyard. 
Also, it includes Orchard Street west 
to the shopping center and the area 
between the Soo Line Railroad 
Tracks and Main Street the unde- 
veloped area : east of downtown Main 
Street is also included, but not the In- 
dustrial park. The district includes 
much of downtown Andoch. 

"What we are doing now is the 
realization of a dream," said Skid- 
more. He quickly identifies improve- 
ment projects made possible by TIF: 
the east side parking lots, the im- 
provements to the backs of down- 
town business buildings, burying 
utility cables, walkways from the 
parking lots to the Main Street stores, 
the park near J.J. Blinkers, and the 
west side parking lots. 

. "Right now," Skidmore said, "our 
next big project is the renovation of 
the sidewalks, the lighting, the trees, 
and the street improvements." 

Sidewalk improvments will start 
this March and take several weeks. 
Last year, replacement parking was 
created and store owners encour- 
aged to create rear entrances to their 
stores to make it easy for customers 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



rector Claude LeMere. "It was right 
in the middle of downtown." 

. "Once we got that building reno- 
vated, the process took its natural 
course," LeMere said. 

Other TIF District inspired im- 
provements have emerged from traf- 
fic studies. 

Mayor Marilyn Shineflug said, . 
"One of the most significant projects 
recommended by die redevelop- 
ment commission for the TIF District' 
was the construction of Skidmore 
Drive to link the Orchard Street ex- 
tension with ParkAvenue." - 

Shineflug cites, the construction 
of the Centegra Health Center and 
construction of the William E Brook 
Wetland Sanctuary and Entertain- 
ment Center as two such improve- 
ment projects. Both projects are in 
the district, but they are not funded 
by the district. They are an example 
of extra benefits that have come 
downtown because of the success of 
other work financed by TIF funds. 

"The addition of the William 
Brook park is something we never 
dreamed of," said Skidmore. It does 
serve as a major community cultural 
focus in the downtown area. It is a 
benefit of economic development; 
and it reflects positively on projects 
that were undertaken, such as build- 
ing improvements, buried utilities, 
parking improvements. 

The Redevelopment Commis- 
sion has been around for more than 
a decade. It includes members who 
have served since the early 1990s as 
well as appointments as recent as 
last year. 

. The commission includes, in ad : 
dition to Skidmore, members Roger 
Sorensen, Larry Hanson, Pete 
Leazeau, John McNeill, Marvin Old- 
enburger, Mabel Lou Weber, and 
Kenneth Karasek. Billie Hor'ton 
serves as the secretary. 

"We're an advisory commis- 
sion," said member Sorensen. 'it's a 
committee that I like to be on." 



ACHS: Seeks enrollment study 




additional study by outside govern- 
ment agencies. 

Board member Larry Peterson 
said that the modernized community 
school building is designed for about 
2,000 students. 

If every classroom space is used 
in the building, however, it might be 
possible to have 2,300 students attend 



the school. 

Student enrollment projections 
are: for the 1999-00 school year, 1,954 
students; year 2000-01, 2,152 stu- 
dents; year 2001-02, 2,322 students; 
year 2002-03, 2,426 students; and year 
2003-04, 2,480 students. 

District estimates are based on 
housing development propose. 



Antioch News 

Vol.114 No, 7 A Lakeland Newspaper ■ Founded 1886 

(USPS 027-030} EdaofWjION**: , • M«rt>«otliuw«PresiA*»oc. 

30 South Whitney St.. Grayslate. IL 60030 Look (oruson the Internet at 

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OH*»0l PubWwtioo; M South Wvtney Si.; GrayrtAa. IL 60030. Ptwno (847)223-8161. 

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WILLIAM H, SCHR0EDER 

Publisher 

KAREN O TOOLE 

Circulation Mgr, 

B0BULMER 

Display Advertising Mgr. 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr. , 



M.R. SCHR0EDER 

Founder-1904-1986 



NEAL TUCKER 

Composition MgtJExeevtive Editor 



WILLIAM M. SCHR0EDER 

President 

MIMI KOOB 

Comptroller 

CORKEY GROSS 

Puttie Relations Manager 



k'J 



VERIFIED RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

/ Wriwwi!fi N Managing EMor 




The new Antioch Post Office will open for business, Feb. 16. It is located across the street frorrv 
the old post office (In background). A grand opening will be held for the state-of-the-art facility in 
spring.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Post Office has expanded services 

New post office opens Feb. 1 6 



J 



Se' 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Antioch residents can use the 
new post office building starting- 
Tuesday, Feb. 16. 

. Official grand opening, cere- 
monies will be hosted later by U.S. 
Postal Service officials in early spring^ 

The Antioch Post Office will fea- 
ture many customer service im- 
provements, from an expanded 
parking lot to new merchandise and 
mailing services inside. 

The new post office is in the 400 
block of Orchard Street at the loca- 
tion of the old McDonald's Restau- 
rant east of the Piggly-Wiggly Super- 
market. 

"There are 27 customer parking 
spaces here," said Tom Prince, Anti- 
och Postmaster. 

Aside from the parking space im- 
provements, the new Antioch Post 
Office will have one of the most up- 
to-date retail postal stores in the 
Chicago region. 

'•It's kind of the wave of the fu- 



ture," said Timothy Ratliff, commu- 
nication specialist for the Northern 
Illinois District of the U.S. Postal Ser- 
vice. 

"The Antioch full-merchandise 
postal -.retail store will be the 12th 
store opened in the northern Illinois 
district," he said. "So, this is kind of 
a unique event.'but is definitely the 
direction.of the future." 

There are about 200 post offices 
in the northern Illinois district. One 
of the.closest examples of the new 
Antioch Post Office is located in 
Prospect Heights, Hi. 

Prince said,., ."Customers can 
shop like in a regular store. "Once 
they have made their selections of 
merchandise, they can take it to a 
cash register. 

According to RaUiff, the postal 
store brings stamps and packaging 
products from behind their counters 
to a lobby area .where customers 
have direct access to them., Cus- 
tomers can browse through displays 
of all the latest stamps, pick up en- 
velopes or packaging supplies, and 



buy them from a clerk at a cash reg- 
ister. This is similar to a regular store. 
The store is designed to be simple 
and easy to use. 

The retail store will have some 
clothing items, books about stamps, 
cards, mouse pads, posters, stamps 
in various denominations, pens, 
- keychains, stationery, and other 
merchandise with postage stamp . 
themes or decorations. 

The new Antioch Post Office will 
continue to have three full-service 
stations. 

According to Prince, there will be 
more post office boxes. Previously, 
there were about 800 post office boxes. 
Now there are 1,128. The boxes will be 
located in their own area so box hold- 
ers can get to them 24-hours a day. 

The post office will provide a 
work station for customers to use to 
wrap packages. Near the vending 
area, it will have a scale and other 
supplies. - 

The U.S. Postal Service will con- 
tinue to use the, present building as a 
carrier-clerk annex, according to 
Prince. People who wish to pick-up 
their vacation-hold mail will do so at 
the carrier-clerk annex. 



I 



Register now for daddy, daughter date 



The Daddy-Daughter Date Night 
registration period ends tonight, Fri- 
day, Feb, 12. There will be no regis- 
trations taken at die door. 

"I want people to know there is a 
deadline," Laurie Stahl of the Anti- 
och Parks and Recreation Depart- 
ment said. There are 425 people who 
have registered. 

However, Stahl also admitted 
that if people come in Saturday 
morning, Feb. 13, she will allow them 
to register. Village hall will be open 
until noon. 

Registration is necessary so they 
can order enough food and corsages. 
"I need to know to make sure .we 
have enough supplies and refresh- 
ments." 

The corsages come from Antioch 

Floral'. "They're really good, " Jtahl- 
said. She wants to make sure every- 
one who attends receives one. 

The dance is at Upper Grade 
School Saturday, Feb. 20 from 7 to 9 

p,m. 

Young daughters who attend 
can be escorted by uncles, older 
brothers, step-fathers, or family 
friends. • __ 

"Listen up men. Auditions for 
PM&L's "Much Ado About Nothing" 




will be held Monday Feb. 15 at 7:30 
p.m. The cast requires 17'men and 4 
women and Tom Hausman directs. 
The play is presented the last three 
weekends of April. They need lots of 
men. 



LoveFest '99 produced quite a 
few winners for the get-away week- 
ends. The Antioch winners were BU- 
Ue Horton, Linda Hockney, Kim 
Domek, Jim Laf ontalne, Donna 
Brankln. One winner was from 
Grayslake, Martha Richards. Two 
winners will.be going to Lake Lawn 
in Delavan, Wis., one to the .Best 
Western Regency here in Antioch, 
one to the Nippersink Country Club 
near Richmond, and one to the 
Sybaris Inn in Northbrook. 

Bob HUdebrand, of Antioch, 
was the winner of the Early Bird Raf- 
fle Drawing. 



Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry President Barbara 
Porch presented a special award to 
Billie Horton. 

The award was in appreciation 
for the work she,has done to make 
LoveFest such a warm and special at- 
mosphere. For the past four years, 
Horton has provided .the creative 
and artistic touch for the lookof each 
LoveFest. 

Crafters can call Dorothee Him- 
ber, 395-6934, to express interest to 
participate in the Spring Craft Show 
at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 
4551. The show will be Saturday, 
March 13 and 14. The show'has gift 
ideas for Easter, spring, and Mother's 
Day. 

The Antioch Community High 
School spring play is "1 Remember. 
■" Mama" and will be directed by Jenny 
Sliker. 

The play opens Thursday, April 
22 at 7:30 p.m. It will also be:per- 
formed Friday and Saturday; April 23 
arid 24. 

If you have interesting infor- 
mation or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town " call staff reporter Ken 
Patchenat223-816k ext.131 or 
e-mail, edii@lnd.com.' 1 







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February 12, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 




POLICE BEAT 

/><?rjo/u charged with a crime are Innocent until proven guilty in a court oflauf. 



ANT10CH 




Open transportation of 
alcohol 

. Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Michael W, Davis, 29, of Antioch on 
Wednesday, Feb. 3 at 11:10 a.m. .- 
traveling west bound on North Av- 
. enue west of Route 83 in a red 1988 
Pontine Grand Am. He was charged 
;j with not having a valid driver's II- 
. cense, driving an uninsured vehicle, 
and illegal transportation of alco- 
hol. Davis posted bond pending a 
court date of Wednesday, Feb. 24 at 
9 a.m. in Grayslake. 

Charged with Dill 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Gordon D. Shogren, 25, of. . 

. Winthrop Harbor, on Monday, Feb. 
. 8 at 1:59 a.m. traveling north bound 
on Deep Lake Road at Deport Street 
in a red 1989 Buick Somerset. He 
was charged with driving under the 
influence. Shogren was released on 
bond pending a court date of Tues- 

- day, March 9 at 9 a.m. 

Picked up on warrant 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Kenneth Lawrence Melton Jr., 30, of 
Antioch, on Monday, Feb. 8 at 5:20 
a.m. at Johelia on North Avenue in a 
green 1994 Ford pick-up truck. He 
was wanted on a warrant issued by 
the Lake County Sheriff. He also 
was issued a citation for not having 
a village sticker. Melton Jr. was re- 
leased on bond on that charge 
pending a court date of Wednesday, 
March 24 in Grayslake. 

Public consumption of 
alcohol 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
< John Irving William Hoffman, 40, of 
Dolton, in the 500 block of Main 
Street on Saturday, Feb. 6 at 3:50 
p.m. in a gold 19B9 Plymouth Mini- 
van. He was charged with the non- 
* traffic related consumption of alco- 
hol in a public place. Hoffman was 
released on bond pending a court 
date on Wednesday, March 10 at 9 
a.m. in Grayslake. 

LINDENHURST 

Illegal transportation 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Jack D. Johnivan, 25, of 
Lake Villa, on Sunday, Jan. 31 at 10 
p.m. at Grand Avenue and Route 83 
in a brown Plymouth 4-door station 



wagon. He was charged with having 
only one operational tall light, Hav- 
ing an expired registration, Improp- 
er use of registration, illegal trans- 
portation of alcohol, no insurance, 
driving under the influence, and 
driving under the influence over 
0.08. He took a breathalyzer test 
(0.19). Johnivan was released on 
bond pending a court date on Tues- 
day, Feb. 23 in Waukegan. 

Picked up on warrant 

Lindenhurst Police Officers' 
stopped Frank Cardenas, 23, of Zion, 
on Tuesday, Feb. 9 at 12:34 a.m. at 
Miilburn Road at Crawford in a Jeep. 
He was wanted on a warrant by the 
McHenry County Sheriff. Cardenas 
was taken to the Lake County Jail. 

LAKE VILLA 

Arrested on warrant 

Lake Villa police charged William 
B. Cheatham, 36, of McHenry, with 
driving on a revoked driver's license 
and picked him up on a warrant out' 
of Stephenson County, HI., following 
a routine traffic stop, Feb. 3 at 1:27 
a.m. Cheatham was stopped while 
traveling southbound on Cedar Lake 
Road. An officer following the vehicle 
checked LEADS and discovered! 
Cheatham was wanted on a warrant 
for contempt of court 

He was processed at the police 
department and released after post- 
ing a full cash bond. 

■ 



Attorney General Jim Ryan 



to speak 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
CKy Editor 

Illinois . Attorney General Jim 
Ryan will visit Grayslake later this 
month to speak on gangs in Lake 
County. 

Ryan's speech will be from 8 a.m. 
to noon Friday, Feb. 26 at theCollege 
of Lake County's Grayslake campus. 
The event is sponsored by the Lake 
County Regional Action Planning. 
Project (RAPP) and Lake County In- 
Touch. 

Lori Baker, coordinator for Lake 
County InTouch, said Ryan was the 
keynote speaker at a RAPP breakfast" 
meeting three years ago and has rep- 
utation as an excellent speaker. 

"I know that the entire organiza- 
tion Is very excited that he's coming, 
and we're hoping the community 
will be too," she said. 

The event will be held in the CLC 
auditorium, which has capacity for 
about 400 people. Baker said she 
hopes to have a turnout of at least 
1 50 to 200. Baker said a large turnout 
will not only show appreciation for 
Ryan's visit but will also show that 
people in the community are "con- 
cerned about youth violence and our 
efforts in tackling this issue." 

Ryan's speech will focus on the 
prevalence of gangs throughout Illi- 




t gangs at CLC 




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■ 



Call i-«nO-THE-CHOICE (1-800-843-2464) to register 



Those physically challenged andlor in need of an ASL interpreter may contacts 
loomed -before a community program to determine ho* Victory canfacil,. 
^Za^ce.Tenenm dispones lossenicios de traducclOn al Espanol. 



Victory 
'Memorial 

Hospital 



nols, provide information on the 
gang problem in Lake County and 
address other issues relating to youth 
violence. 

"Our focus for the workshop that 
day is youth violence and gangs, and 
Mr.^Ryan has taken a passionate 
stance against gangs throughout his 
career," Baker said. 

In addition to Ryan's speech, 
there will also be presentations by 



Gang Outreach, the Lake County 
GangTask Force and the Schwab Re- 
habilitation Hospital and Care Net- 
work "In My Shoes" Program. 

The cost of the event is $10 for 
pre-registration, $15 at the door. 
Lake County RAPP members will get , 
in free. ■ 

Registration at the door starts at 
7:30 a.m. A continental breakfast will 
be served. 



Savers Club* books available 



First National Dank-Employee 
Owned has announced that their 
1999 Savers Club Discount Books are 
now available for order. 

The 1999 Savers Club Discount 
Book are one of die benefits offered 
to all Eagle 50 and Common Sense 
Checking account holders at First 
" National Bank-Employee Owned; 
The Savers Club Discount book of- 
fers savings on travel, dining, enter- 
tainment and other special services 
including 50 percent off on lodging 



nationwide. 

Anyone interested in finding out 
how to receive or reorder a 1999 
Savers Club DiscountBook should 
call First National Bank- Employee 
Owned at 838-BANK (2265). 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 12, 1999 



SCHOOL DIGEST 






Summer school fees 

Antioch Community High 
School summer school fees will re- 
main the same as last year. 

The Board of Education voted to 
set summer school fees at $100 for a 
standard six hour class. 

"What we're trying to do here is 
break even on it," said district Busi- 
ness Manager Bill Ahlers. 

The fees were set at the Thurs- 
day, Feb. 4 meeting. 

Computer cable 
installation 

The Antioch Community High 
School Board of Education voted at 
their Thursday, Feb. 4 meeting to re- 
cable the school building to system 
server locations. 

The total package of services was 
described as a minor upgrade for 
$125,718. In addition, new connec- 
tions for.computers will be added. 

"This is the cabling and associat- 
ed equipment to do it," said district 



Business Manager Bill Ahlers. "That 
is pretty much bare bones." 

The work does not include com- 
puter hardware. 

ACHS bleacher 
upgrades 

Bleachers at Antioch Communi- 
ty High School will be brought into 
compliance with Life Safety Codes. 

"We are required by law, now, to 
do this work at some time," said dis- 
trict Business Manager Bill Ahlers, 

He reported the resufts of three 
proposals to put end rails on some 
bleachers, widen some aisles, and to 
cover gaps between the seats to no 
less than four inches. 

School Board members ap- 
proved a proposal by Bleacher Amer- 
ica, Inc. to make the improvements 
during spring break. 

"This is a very good proposal at 
$39,190," said Ahlers, 

An estimate a few years ago sug- 
gested the work would cost $94,000 



Youth Sports 

We Want to report on your local teams 
Please call Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161 




serves no real 




What is it with guys 
and their hats? Over 
the course of the 
years, the female 
species has taken quite a ribbing 
about the numbers of pairs of 
shoes that may rest ever so neatly 
at the bottom of our closets, but 
that number is by far inferior to 
the number of men's hats strategi- 
cally placed all over the house (i.e. 
anywhere they are taken off, just 
like the rest of their clothing, 
socks, shoes, etc.) Granted we fe- 
males may have three pairs of red 
shoes, but there is a reason for 
that, and someday I will get 
around to explaining it, but for 
now we are talking hats, men's 
hats. 

The male species not only 
have sports hats from their fa- 
vorite professional and college 
basketball, football, and baseball 
teams, but the also feel the need to 
show their studliness by toting 
NBA, NFL and NHL logo hats. Do 
we dare mention all the free ad- 
vertising done on the brim of these 
popular chapeaus? From airlines 
to motor oil, from corporations to 
golf courses. Lest not forget ail the 




JINGLE 

FROM 
PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



cute, obnoxious, degrading and x- 
rated sayings that grace the front 
of some of those hats. 

Now us women, wives and sig- 
nificant others, know the real rea- 
son our beloved soul mates tooddle 
around in these caps— its called 
bad hair day. And I will be the first 
female to admit how extremely jeal- 
ous I am for riot being able to throw 
myseaweed-on-a-rockhairup un- 
der one of those glorious little visors 
from time to time. On any given 
morning as you visit your local fam- 
ily-owned restaurant, checkout the 
lunch counter, where the hat-totin' 
boys sit with their paper and coffee. 
Under those caps sits slicked back, 
well-oiled hair, the perfect breeding 
ground for any epidemic-type 
germs. 

Now don't ever go so far 
though, as to take the liberty of re- 



moving that popular head piece 
uninvited. It'san unspoken rule- 
that seemingly harmless tittle act 
will buy you a lunch ticket to the 
Pearly White gates. But heaven 
forbid this favorite bonnet comes 
up missing, and It's a panic strick- 
en male that will frantically scour 
the corner of the family home 
leaving no couch cushion un- 
turned until the well worn, per-, 
fectly moulded to the head, and 
positively filthy relic is found. For 
it sin the one: the lucky one, the 
special one, the one that sums up 
his personality in a word or two. 

It is hard for women to under- 
stand all the fuss over these ridicu- 
lous articles of clothing, that sit 
perched atop a man's head like a 
forehead bumper sticker. They are 
revered like some worshipped 
idol— this for an article of clothing 
that doesn't even keep the ears 
warm. At least women's shoes 
serve a real purpose. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 



Readers with information for "Jin- 
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Single at 395-6364. 



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February 12, 1999 



NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



NEIGHBORS 



Name: Bob Lindblad 
Home: Antioch. 



EIGH 



Community Involvement: President of the Lakes Re- 
gion Historical Society and Director on the Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry. 

I'm originally from: Maywood, 111. We moved here in 
June, 1947. 

I graduated "from: Proviso High School in Maywood. 

My 'family consists of: My wife, Dorothy, and three daughters, 
Susan, Wendy, and Robin. 

What I like best about Antioch: Having practically grown up 
here, I like what has happened to it in terms of the business atmos- 
phere and the recreational atmosphere. Through all the years, I've 
enjoyed it, I've made many exceptionally good friends. It's been a 
good, place with good people. I just like it. I enjoy going down the 
street and knowing people I meet along the way. 

What I like best about my job: At the Historical Society, I enjoy 
the fact that we're increasing the display area. I like going back into 
history. It's good to hear from people around the country on our e- 
mail connection. It's good to be in contact with people. It's fun and 
it's enjoyable. With the chamber, I'm still in the learning process. It is 
fun to be responsible for their activities, especially the upcoming 
Business Expo. 

I relax by: In good weather, Dorothy and I like to play golf. We. like 
to take long-weekends during the year. We like to swim at resorts in 
the area. We used to do quite a bit of bowling, but not lately. I work 
on things at home. 

My perfect day in Antioch would be: A good summer day to 
walk around the village, like at the Taste of Antioch, just browsing 
around town. I'm looking forward to the finishing of the Brook wet- 
land project and enjoying walking there. . 

Favorite TV show is: I like "The Cosby Show," "Diagnosis Mur- 



X • ■ 



der," "JAG.," and sports — football and baseball. 

Favorite movie is: "Saving Private Ryan" and "The 
Thin Red Line." 

Favorite music: The Big Band Era. We kind of grew up 
on that, 

Favorite restaurant: Our family goes out to all of 
them in the Antioch area. 

Favorite band or musician: Glen Miller. I get a kick 
out of Larry Leafblad and his band. 

My life's motto Is: Treat others as you would have them treat 
you. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: Abraham Lin- 
coln. We've been by his home In Springfield. I think the times he lived 
in were challenging, yet he seemed to be able to handle it 

I want to be remembered as: Someone who smiled a lot and 
who, in some ways, made other people's life a little better. 

My pet peeve is: Someone that lies to me. 

Most famous, person I ever met was: Franklin Roosevelt. 
I was in the service in North Africa when he came to the Yalta 
Conference. I was in charge of the detail that helped unload the 
plane. 

My dream job would be: Actually, up until the time I retired, I 
think I had it. I was corporate secretary and office manager at Ray- 
mond Chevrolet with Ray Scarpelli. I was with him for 16 years. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Florida. 
We have some good friends down there. That would be the first 
choice. The other would be Arizona. 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



FUNDRAISING 

GUIDE 



^ Feb. 13. and 14, 39th Chain of 
ces Fishing Derby; grand prizes, 
Raymond Chevrolet-Oldsrnbbile late 
model car raffle, by Northern Illinois 
Conservation Club, information: Mc- 
Dermit's resort, 395-4704. 

Feb. 23 to April .30, Hastings 
Lake YMCA- Kids Need Heroes Cam- 
paign, annual giving campaign, Infor- 
mation: 356-4006 

March 6, Third Annual Comedy 
Night and Silent Auction, Antioch Ju- 
nior Woman's Club, at Father Hanley 
Hall, $15 tickets at First National 
Hank- Employee Owned, club mem- 
■ bers. * 

April 11, Raffle to buy Cairns IRIS 
Thermal Imaging Camera, only 200 
tickets at $150 apiece, $10,000 given 
away, Antioch Firefighters Association, 
tickets at State Bank ofThe Lakes, First 
National Bank- Employee Owned, 
First National Bank of Chicago. 

June 16, District 34 Education 
, Foundation, Golf Outing, Spring Val- 
ley Golf Course. 

July 10, $10 Raffle tickets for new 
1998 Blazer donated by Raymond 
. Chevrolet and Oldsmobile, for St. Pe- 
ter's School, Tickets at State Bank of 
The Lakes, First National Bank- Em- 
ployee Owned, First National Bank of 
Chicago. 

July 14, Sequoit Pride Golf Out- 
ing. 

Until July 24, CAN Raffle, Anti- 
och Chamber of Commerce and In- 
dustry. Tickets: Pat 395-2233. 

Oct 30, Masquerade Ball by Ami- 

* bch Woman's Club at Maravelas Ban- 
quet Facility. 

On -going, William E. Brook 
Memorial, Fund, various-sized per- 
sonalized bricks- and plaques, $50, 

^•$175, and $500. Order-form from 
Vickie Axtori at 395-1309. - ' 
- On-going, Raffle for 1999 

;■.; Chevrolet,, for Lake^ Villa Township, 
Baseball League, $10 tickets from Mar^ 

• ty Geweke, Raymond Chevrolet and 
;' Oldsmobile, 120 West Route 173; An- 

$Uqcjj£' ■ • " ' , 

On-going: A.LL Parent Network 
;< selling personalized bricks for ACHS 
'■■'■ memorial wall and courtyard walk in 
-, new.buUdihg. Bricks $30, Plaque $60 

donations. Information: Karen Powell, 

395-6600. 



TMI5: CLASSIFIED SECTION 

Call Maureen Combs at 223-8161 Ext. 109 
Weekdays From 8:00 A.M.. to 5:00 P.M./Deadline is 10 A.M. Wednesday 



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Calendar 



Friday, Feb. 12 

8 p.m. PM&L 877 Main St., 
Antioch presents "Sleuth," call. 
395-3055 for ticket reservations, 

Saturday, Feb. 13 

8 a.m. -4 p.m., 39th Annual Chain 
O'Lakes Ice Flshin' Derby and 
Winter Festival at Dick Waters 
Conservation and Education Cen- 
ter, Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club, Info, at 395-6422 



8 p.m. PM&L 877 Main St., 
Antioch presents "Sleuth," call 
395-3055 for ticket reservations 



Sunday, Feb. 14 

Valentine's Day 

2:30 p.m. PM&L 87,7 Main St., 
Antioch presents "Sleuth," call 
395-3055 for ticket reservations 

Monday, Feb. 15 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 

Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 


6 p.m. Police and Fire Commission 

at village hall 

7 p.m., PEG meeting at ACHS 

7-8:30 p.m., Volunteer Orientation 
Session for PADS (Public Action to 
Deliver Shelter), at the PADS office 
at 3001 Green Bay Rd., Bldg. #5 
in North Chicago. Anyone over 18 
who can volunteer once a week or' 
once a month at a shelter is invit- 
ed, no reg. necessary, and attend- 
ing the training session does hot 
obligate volunteering, call 689- 
4357 x.103 to find out more 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Village Board 
meets at village hall 

- ■ 
7:30 p.m. Antioch Coin CJub 

meets at Antioch Public Library 

.7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community . 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

„„„,; ,„„„,„)» ,MM» •!'••• |<l^ 

7:30 p.m. Auditions open to all for 
cast and crew in PM&L* Theater's 
"Much Ado About Nothing" 

Tuesday, Feb. 16 

New Antioch Post Office opens 

10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., The 
Antioch Senior Center holds their 
Valentine Party with a band and 
dinner, cost is $4/person, anyone 
interested, call 395-7120 

,„,„„■ , . »(( ft**!.....* ,»TM.,.i»tff .ttMMI «»•*•< 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available. Doors 
open at 4:30 p.m., call 395-5393 

Wednesday, Feb. 17 

9. a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out for infants to 5 year olds,* 
call 395-1362 ■ 

7 p.m. Antioch Park Board meets 
at Community Bldg. 



Thursday, Feb. 18 

7:30 p.m., Loon Lakes Manage- 
ment Assoc meets at Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr. 

7:30 p.m. ACHS Board meets at 
Grass Lake School 

Coming soon 

February 20 

9:00 a.m., Aglow International 
Antioch Chapter meeting at Hunter 
Country Club, 1 block east of Rte. 
12 on Rfe/173 In Richmond/ 
R.S.V.P. by Feb. 17 at (8i5f648- 
2166 qri815) 648-2744 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



uw* W -* * 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 12, 1999 



St. Peter's School science scholars shine with studies 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Science projects at the St. Peter's 
School Science Fair ranged from 
simple machines to solar distillation 
and electrical conductivity. . 

It was held Jan. 28 in a gymnasi- 
um filled with people, parents, 
plants, some rotting teeth, electrical 
ear warmers, rocket cars, and a few 
mice. 

Third Grade teacher Donna 
Kohler teaches science at St. Peter's 
School. "What we're studying right 
now is simple machines," she said 
of her students. 

Kohler said that student projects 
focused on principles associated 
with simple machines like the 
plane, wedge, screw, pulley, lever, 
and the wheel and axle. Students 
wrote reports and many worked in 
teams of two to create their exhibits. 

"This is the first year we've had a 
science fair for the whole school," 
she said. 

"They absolutely love It," she 
said. Doing the projects is so much 
more interesting than reading about 
them. 

"The pulley seemed like a fun 
thing to do," said third grade stu- 
dent Kelly Rakosnik. 

She' had some very definite ideas 
about what she wanted to do for her 
project. 

Her mother, Mary. Farr, and 
step-father, Daniel Farr, pitched in 
to help as did sister Katie. In less 
than three hours, Kelly Rakosnik 
had her project done. 

"My mother sewed the flag out 
of the. material I had," Rakosnik 
said. Her step-father cut the board. 

"She was quite adamant about 
. her design," said Mary Farr of her 
daughter's work on the project. 

Part of the inspiration may have 



howtewkw™* 

Has an Efkctgm 

Electpkal 



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1- ' ' 




Anne McKinney earned a blue ribbon at the St. Peter's School 
Science Fair as well as a chance to compete in an energy fair 
sponsored by Commonwealth Edison. Her project tested resis- 
tance to the flow of electricity. — Photo by Kenneth Patchen 



come from the Discovery Museum 
in Milwaukee. "We've been up 
there," said Farr. The exhibits on 
working mechanics were very 
appealing to her daugh- 
ter. The result was that 
she was eager to present 
her exhibit that illustrat- 
ed operation of a pulley. 
Two students won 
blue ribbons. Anne 
McKinney, 12 and a 
half, In the seventh 
grade, presented a sci- 
ence project tided "How 
Temperature has an 
Effect on Electrical 
Conductivity." She now 
will compete in a fair 




Rakosnik: 

'Seemed like a 
fun thing to do.' 

sponsored by Commonwealth "I've been working on it since 

Edison. the second of January," she said. 

Katie Korecek, 12, in the seventh "That's when we did our first trial." 



grade, won the blue ribbon for the 

St. Peter's School Science Fair. Her 

project was on Solar Distillation. 

McKinney said, "I wanted to do 

something on energy, 

and it was interesting." 

Her project included 
water, salt water, wood, 
aluminum, copper wire, 
and a resister. "I tested 
their resistance to the 
flow of electricity," she 
said. 

Katie Korecek chose 
her project on solar distil- 
lation "because it has to 
do with everyday life." 

"It distills water to make 
it pure," she said. 



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Katie Korecek earned a St. Peter's School Science Fair blue rib- 
bon for her project on solar distillation, a way to obtain pure 
water from water that is not potable.— Photo, by Kenneth 
Patchen 



The final result was a first place 
finish for her project. 

All three students expressed pos- 
itive feelings about the experience. 

Third grade student Kelly 
Rakosnik expects to participate in . 
the science fair next year. "I love it," 
she said. 

McKinney said that she enjoyed 
it too. "It was fun." 

Other students participating in 
the 1999 St. Peter's School Science 
Fair include the following students 
and their projects: 
Fourth Grade 

Cyndi Chapman and Kari 
Anderson, Digestion of Food; 
Jessica Zimny and Tricia Pringle,' 
The Human Heart; Katie Hucker 
and Laura Gursky, What Plants Eat; 
Tim Anastos, Magnetism; Dan 
Kuawski, Home Electricity; Sean 
Kelly, Magnetism; Bailey Lundman 
and Sarah Larson, Taste Buds; 
Caitlyn Marino and Page Tybor, 
Electricity Static; Ryan Mitchell and 
Justin Nehmer, 10 Minute Motor; 
Megan Nute, Spinning Circles of 
Color; ' Carolyn Pail, How the 
Pyramids Were Built; Max Thain, 
Venus Fly Trap Plant; Jereme Olsen, - 
Conductors and Insulators; Kevin 
Korecek, Smokestack Under -Water; 
Tommy Freeman, Electricity Game; 
and, A. J. Umlaut, Electro-magnetic 
Crane. 
Fifth Grade 

Kimberly Conley and Maggie 
Lonergan, Why Are There Less 
Hours of Daylight in Winter?; Matt 
Zagorski, Sound Tubes; Will 
Addison and George Kraenzle, A 
Simple Electric Motor; Cameron 
Ruth and Joe Scully, What Happens 
When a Plant Doesn't Get Sunlight; 
Lindsey White, Difference Between 
Working and Burned-out Light 
Bulb; Paul Krzus, Make Things Sink 
then Float; Kevin Huebner and 
Jimmy Murray, How the Heart 
Functions; Matt Duensing, 
Telepathy Experiment; Joey Boarini 
and Bobby Dzike, The Effect of 
Different Liquids on- Plants; Ted 
Liniewicz and Matt Dykiel, Fungus 
Among Us; Megan Lloyd, Tornado 
Demo; Lauren Schartz and Nicole 
Michehl, The Solar System (How 
Plants Rotate Around the Sun); 
Megan Quain, Volcano; Sarah 
Stangel and Erin Thelen, How Does 
a Telephone Use Sound Waves to 
Work; Jeremy Mumenthaler, Will 
Current Electricity Travel Through 
■all Object Types?; Sarah Kelly and 
Gwyn Sowa, How Cameras Work; 
and, Marcus Shelden and Chris 



Zicarelli, Aerodynamic. 
Sixth grade 

Dan Tybor and Dan Ruth.Mouse 
Maze; Bill Vos and Teddy Nischan, 
Generator; Tom Kraenzle arid Dak 
Swangka, Median Grow Elements; 
Jonathan Marino and Kevin Gruber, 
Plant Growth; Tom New, Rock 
Tumbling; Kyle Stone, Corriparing 
Conductors (of Electricity); Shane 
Mooney and Tauras Skripkauskas, 
Electrical Ear Warmers; Brendan 
Nute, Model Lighting System; 
Marilyn Krzus, Hot Air Balloon; 
Krista White, Energy Conservation 
Through Use of Modern 
Technology- "Lighting"; Brittany 
Goodrich, Beach Erosion; Christina 
Haas, Simple Circuit; and, Jennifer 
Bubel, Decomposing Wood. 
Seventh Grade 

Kristin Nelson and Jenny Ano, 
Batteries; Mike Roman, Plants; 
Michael Morici, Strength 'of 
Eggshells and Paper; Brandon 
Ziemann, DNA; Taylor Pechauer, 
Detergents; James Larson, Testing 
of Batteries; Alan Thain, Learned 
Behavior; Michael Ano, Plants; Joey 
Anderson and Matt Thelen, 
Coefficient of Friction; Anthony 
DcFalco and Dan Garwood, Model 
Rocketry; Ursula Martens, 
Lightbulbs; Anne McKinney, How 
Temperature Has an Effect on 
Electrical Conductivity; Mary 
Petrosko and Jennifer Michehl, 
Solar Energy; Bill Liniewicz, Not All 
Batteries are Alike; Katie Korecek, 
Solar Distillation; and Liz Johnson, 
Hydroponics. 
Eighth Grade 

Lindsey Gruber and Kelly Wells, 
Plant vs. Plant; Ken Dzike and Mike 
Addison, Saving . Energy with 
Bacteria; Ryan Cullen, Acid Rain; 
Christy Anderson, Burning Candles; 
Susan Roman and Jenny Ziccaelli, 
The Mice Maze- Animal 
Experiences; Bryan, Bassett and 
Russ Zagorski, Acid Rain; Allison 
Lichamer and Heidi Stieber, Teeth- 
Rotting Fluids Revealed; Xav 
Guillaume, The Banded Woolly 
Bear; Nellie Strang and Kate Byrne, 
How Music Affects ' Plants; Nick 
Kouvclis and Nick Arnold,. Heat 
Energy; Becky Geyer and Kjersten 
Martens, Crystals; T. J. Ruth, Rocket 
Car; Vinnie Boarini and Jim 
. O'Connell, Break-through 

Biosphere; Travis Mumm and Marc 
Vetere, Shoe Warmers; Brittany 
Harrison arid Mark Kotelnicki, 
.Snow Crystals; Heather Steiber and 
Gina Kraenzle, Electrical; and Eddie 
Foreman, Garbage on Meteors. . 



LaLeche League plans meeting 



LaLeche League of Central lake . 
County is holding a fall/winter series ' 
of meetings. Mothers can meet on 
another and get the information they 
need to make starting breast feeding 
easier. The meeting, titled "The Birth 
of Your Baby and Baby's First 
Weeks,", discusses how to get breast 
feeding'off to a good start and learn 



some helpful hints on how to make 
baby's ^homecoming an easy transi- 
tion for everyone In the family. 

The meeting will be held on 
Wednesday, Feb. 17, at 9:30a.m, at 
the Lake Villa Library, 1001 Grand 
Ave. 

Call Janet 265-1671 for more 
information. 



H.i 



*< rrnNPrM»^ ^^ ****-- *-.**^ M ^ J .^*^ ! ^ J 



■■■■'"■ ■'■ +i ■ ... 








THE 
CUPBOARD 



- LeeFilas 



Boys sectional 
seedings set 



B 



dos. 



oys sectional seedings were 
handed out this week, with 
little.surprfses for area high 
school basketball aflciona- 



The number one seed was gob- 
bled up by Warren while the num- 
ber two seed was taken by Zton- 
Benton. 

Both, teams are good In their 
own right, have beaten each other 
once and have the same identical 
overall record. So, either one sitting 
high atop the. seeding is a great 
choice. 

Third is Mundelein, which I 
■ don't really have a problem with ex- 
cept that, in my personal opinion, 
Grayslake may be a touch better. . 
Grayslake has taken the fourth spot, 
but either way, I still feel these are 
the four best teams in the area. 

Sitting in the "fifth position, to • 
my shock, Is Stevenson High 
School. You know, I thought this list 
didn't have anything to do with de- 
mographics and size, but was deter- 
mined by how good the team was. 

Stevenson, as you may remem- 
ber, has lost to eight-seed Antioch 
twice. Stevenson is the same team 
that has been crushed twice by 
Mundelein and Warren, beat num- 
ber 16 seed Wauconda by three and 
have lost their last seven in a row 
against NSC teams. 

. Number six is Lake Zurich, with 
the seventh seed going to Deerfield. 
The number eight seed belongs to. 
Antioch which, I feel, is an injustice 
to Antioch's play all year. They beat 
Stevenson twice and they're stuck 
in me rjas'ement while Stevenson is 
near the front of the line. 

Number nine is occupied by 
Lake Forest and Grant is parked in 
the number 10 slot. Carmel is num- 
ber 11 and Highland Park occupies 
the 12 slot' 

The 13th seed falls to Liber- 
tyville, while Waukegan occupies 
the 14th seed and North Chicago, ( 
now 1-10 in the NSC - way to go!) is 
in the 15th seed; 

Then, 16 and 17, Wauconda and 
Round Lake respectively will be" the 
coolest late round game of the year. 

With 17 teams in the region 
playing to move on, the last two 
seeds, Wauconda and Round Lake, 
have to play each other, in one final 
game of the year to see who gets to 
move on and face Warren in the 
opening round of regionals. 

Scott Williams, coach of Wau- 
conda, was Round Lake's coach last 
year and Round Lake is looking for 
redemption. The two teams have 
played each other twice this year, 
with both games turning out low 
scoring/defensive minded contests. 
Plus, it's do or die time for both 
teams, which adds a little spice to 
the already heated battle! 

Another game to watch; Uber- 
tyville against Grayslake. We'll final- 
ly see if indeed Libertyville is better 
than the sub-.500 record shows. 




wo honors are will be offered 
this week: 

Antioch, on Friday, Feb. 12 dur- 
ing half-time of the boys basketball 
game against Lake Forest, will be 
honoring former athletic director 
Ward Lear for his achievements on 
it's annual hall of fame night. For 
more information, please call Anti- 
och High School at 395-1421. 

Also, at Grant High School in • 
Fox Lake, on Feb. 12, George Faoro . 
will be honored for his 30 years of 
service as an assistant basketball 
coach for Grant High School. 

Lee Filascan be reached at (847) 
223-8161, ext,130;fax (847) 223- 
881 0; or e-mail at edit@lnd.com. 



SPORTS 



February 12, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9 J 




sno 



■ 

[3I3CC iliv 




Antioch's Amanda Pollitt returns 
from "Down Under" excursion 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 

About three months ago, Aman- 
da Pollitt was working toward raising 
over $3,000. This money was not to 
be used as a down payment on a car, 
nor would it go into her college fund. 
It was the money necessary for her to 
travel to Australia and play softball 
with some of the best young softball 
talent in this coun- 
try and around the 'Ihoda lot of film But 

WOr inmid-Novem- ^OShomeskkalot 
ber, Pollitt joined Pf the time 

the Field of Cham- 
pions Softball team Amanda Pollitt 
and flew down to 
Australia, where the 
traveling all-star team goes annually 
to play In one of the most competi- 
tive and enjoyable softball tourna- 
ments in the world; 

Pollitt, a 14-year-old freshman at 
Antioch Community High School, 
was the youngest to ever grace the 
roster of this prestigious team, a 
team usually made up of high school 
seniors and college freshmen. 

Through extensive fund-raising 
and hard work, Pollitt 
raised the $3,150 need- 
ed for the trip, and her 
adventures began. 

"I had a lot of fun," 
said Pollitt. "But I was 
homesick a lot of the 
time." 

The team was 
scheduled to play 
about 12 games, and Pollitt appeared 
In eight before suffering a fluke back 
injury prior to one of the games. 



But when shedld play, she made 
everyone forget that she was- the 
"baby" of me team. 

"I played pretty good. All the 
coaches said I did a good job; I think 
I got better as we played more 
games," said Pollitt. 

But the trip was more than just a 
softball trip, it allowed the girls to ex- 
perience a new culture, a new coun- 
try and a way of life that was different 
from their own. 

"The worst thing 

about it was the food," 

said Pollitt with a giggle. 

"I tried vegemite— that 

is the nastiest stuff. 

Even their Pizza Hutt's 

are different" 

■ s - While "Down 

Under?' the softball players lived 

with host families, another way that 

the girls could get a glimpse of the 

Australian way of life. 

"My host family was nice, but 

their bathrooms were weird." said 

Pollitt. "They have the toilet ma 

separate room from the rest of the 

bathroom, and instead of on lever 

to flush, they have three buttons." 

Even with.all these other, things 

going on" around: 

*We See a lot Of Com- them, the girls did 

petition in Illinois, manage to get in 

but thenVOU see some softball, arid 

someone like that— learn from the other 

they're just awesome' teams. 

J J "It was a lot of 

Amanda Pollitt Fun. I got to meet a 

girl who plays for 

the Canadian 

Olympic team," said Pollitt. "We 

see a lot of competition in Illinois, 

but then you see someone like 




Amanda Pollitt, a freshman at Antioch Community High School, 
traveled to Australia in November 1998 as a member of the Field 
of Champions international softball team: — Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



that— they're just awesome." 

Currently Pollitt and her fresh- 
men counterparts at ACHS are 
conditioning in preparation for 
softball tryouts in March. She's not 
sure whether she'll make the fresh- 
man, sophomore or varsity team, 
but to her it doesn't matter. She 
just wants to play. 

And what was ' her reaction 
when she returned to the U.S.? 

"You can tell you're in the U.S. 
when you get to LA. There's a dif- 



ference in the afr — it's so much 
cleaner in Australia. It so green 
and there's no trash, like In Chlca- 
go. 

But the main thing that was 
different when she landed on U.S. 
soil was that she didn't have to be 
homesick anymore. 

"There's no place like home," 
said Pollitt. "I was crying from LA. 
on the phone." 

There really is no place like 
home. 



Grant, Grayslake, Antioch earn top honors 

Wrestlers around the area reach sectionals from Grayslake regional battles 



By LEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Everything was.on the line for 
area high school wrestling teams 
this past weekend, with the IHSA 
state regional tournament hap- 
pening at Grayslake High School 
on Saturday. 

And, what was supposed to be 
a Grant-Antioch showdown for 
first place became a three-way 
dance, as Grayslake, fielding their 
strongest team for the first time 
this year, threw their hat into the 
ring; 

"This was the first time all year 



that everybody was healthy," said 
Steve Wood, Grayslake wrestling 
coach. "Somebody was always out 
for us throughout the year, for one 
reason or another. Something was 
always wrong." 

Throwing personal Issues into 
the wind, Grayslake shocked 
everyone, sending nine kids to the 
individual regional tournament 
next week, but still fell to Grant 
high school in team points, by a fi- 
nal of 195 to 171. 

Antioch, who was expected to 
fight Grant tooth and nail for the 
top spot, took a, surprising third 
behind. Grayslake with 148 total 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name: Ryan 
Hlhiak 

School: Antioch 
Sport: Wrestling 
Year: Senior 
Last week's stats: 
Won 

individual 
regional title at 135 
poundsat 
Grayslake regional 
last week. 




Name: Erica 
Brown 
School: 
Antioch 
Sport: 
Basketball 
Year: Freshman 
Last week's stats: 
Scored six points to 
lead the Sequoits in 
a loss to Libertyville 
last week. 



team points. 

Waukegan scored 106 points, 
with Warren (95), Zion-Benton 
(51), Round Lake (40) and North 
Chicago rounding out the top eight 
teams in the meet. 

Individual winners for 
Grayslake include Rueben Estrada 
at 103 pounds, who outlasted Tom 
Hart from Antioch in the finals. 
Eric Peterson beat Charlie Jasinski 
in the finals of the 1 19 pound class 
for a first place victory, Andy 
Hamelet beat Jim Gibbs of Grant at 
152 pounds and Wes Anderson de- 
feated Nate Carden of Antioch in 
the afternoon's best match at 215 
pounds. 

Other Grayslake wrestlers who 
made to sectionals are Jason Lang 
at 130 pounds, Justin Hansen at 
135 pounds, Mark Stewart at 140 
pounds, Quinn Kearby at 145 
pounds and Dale Bowser at 160 
pounds. 

.For Antioch, Ryan Hliniak at 
135 pounds and Jeff Gienoth in the 
heavyweight division will move on 
to sectionals as champions, while 
Steve Smart at 189 pounds/Brian. 
Johnson at 171 pounds; Jake 
Crammond at 160 pounds and Bob 
Grasser at 125 pounds will move 



on in sectionals. 

For Warren, who finished 
fourth in the tournament, Sean 
Michaels became a champion at 
112 pounds, Eugene Neal took a 
second place at 135 pounds, Kurt 
.Szempruch took a third place at 
152 pounds, and Wes Griffis also 
took a third place, but in the 171 
pound category. 

For Round Lake, only Mike 
Pocasaugre in the 140 pound divi- 
sion will work In the sectionals, 
placing third in the 140 pound 
weight class. / 

However, despite the team 
loss, Wood said he is not disap- 
pointed by Grayslake's team effort 
all year. 

'*! knew coming in it was going, 
to be art adjustment , period," 
Wood said. "They needed to get to 
know me and I needed to get to 
know them. I'm pleased with the 
way. the ,kids wrestled.. They 
worked hard and we tried our 
best." 

The individual wrestling sec- 
tional tournament will be held at 
Conant High School in .Hoffman 
Estates, on Feb. 12 and 13, while 
the state tournament will be held 
on Feb. 19 and 20 in Springfield. 



■ —-.... 



en 



A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



February 12, 1999 




Antioch junior Jordan Phillips takes the ball to the hoop against North Chicago last week as the two 
rival NSC teams battled. — Photo by Steve Young 

Lady Wildcats rout Lady Sequoits 



By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 



It's just hard to compete with 
Libertyville in any respect. * 

They have height, strength, 
depth, speed and quickness, which 
all added up to an Antioch 63-28 
loss on Saturday night in girls bas- 
ketball. 

It was a bad game from the tip, 
as Antioch could only score 2 points 
in the opening quarter and 9 by the 



half as Libertyville ran roughshod 
over the Sequoits, scoring 18 and 19 
respectively in the two opening 
quarters to build a 37-9 half time 
lead. 

Antioch woke up in the second 
quarter, but the damage was done 
and Libertyville ran away with the 
win. 

Leading scorer for Antioch was 
6-1 freshman Erica Brown who fin- 
ished with six points under the 
boards, while senior captain Amie 



Carlberg had four on the night. 

Senior Katie Gofron led Antioch 
with seven points on the evening, 
while sophomore Justine Sinkus 
and junior Jourdan Phillips scored 
five points apiece. 

The Antioch girls will now take 
the weekend off in preparation for 
the first round of the IHSA regional 
tournament on Monday. Antioch is 
ranked 12th in the tournament, and 
will travel to fifth ranked Waukegan 
on Monday night. . 



Lakeland Newspapers 



; 




.*%. 



jpai£- >;$m± 




RarinRovell 

Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 

Serving Antioch, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst 
& Wisconsin 

PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext 105 
PAGER (847) 237-0611 



Favorite Part of the Job: 

The Creativity Of Designing Effective Ad 
Campaigns That Produce Results 



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■ j^S^S^j^jff^, 



Sequoits fall 




By LEE FILAS 
Staff Reporter 



You knew it had to happen soon- 
er or later.'.' 

For the first time since the 1996- 
97 North Suburban Conference bas- 
ketball season, the North Chicago 
Warhawks won a conference basket- 
ball game, an overtime thriller 
against, none other than, the Antioch 
Sequoits by a final score of 40-37. 

"We didn't really show up and 
play real well during the game," said 
Jeff Dresser, Antioch boys basketball 
coach. "They played a tough half- 
court defense and trapped us often. 
They're quick and beat us to the ball." 

The game was summed up in de- 
fense, as five quarters of basketball 
amounted to only 77 points com- 
bined between the two teams, or two 
points shy of Grayslake High School's 
total points scored, by themselves, in 
four quarters on Saturday night. 

"We know, what we were sup- 
posed to do," Dresser added. "But, af- 
ter the Warren loss on Tuesday, we 
had a couple of bad practices and the 
kids just took North Chicago to light- 
ly." 

Prior to this game, the Warhawks 
had lost 28 straight NSC conference 
match-ups, dating back to 1996. 

The first quarter was a sniff of 
things to come, as Antioch (11-11,4- 
7) scored only eight points in the first 
quarter, but held the Warhawks (5- 
16, 1-10) to three to take the early 
lead. 

. In the second, North Chicago's 
Ricky Irby got hot, and helped North 
Chicago score 10 points while hold- 
ing Antioch to four to take the early 
13-12 half-time lead. 

In the third, Antioch retook the 
lead, outscoring North Chicago 12-7, 
but the Warhawks tied it up at the. 



buzzer to send the game into.over- 
time. 

Once in overtime,' the teams 
traded buckets until the game was 
tied at35-35 with 27 seconds left to go 
when North Chicago's DeVaunh 
Johnson hit a 7 footer off the glass to 
take the lead 37-35. 

Antioch sophomore, Eric White 
hit a running lay-up to tie ttie'score 
with eight seconds left. North Chica- 
go used their last time out, and carne 
out of the huddle. 

After three passes, Irby was alone 
in the corner beyond the arch and 
put the biscuit in the basket at the 
buzzer to steal the win. . 

"I think Warren just blitzed us so 
hard, that the kids just overlooked 
North Chicago," Dresser said. "The 
loss was definitely a low point in our 
season." ■ • 

Lackey led Antioch with'; 15 
points, while White added 11. How- 
ever, the bench and the other three 
starters for Antioch only amassed 11 
points between them, while Irby, for 
North Chicago, led all with 16 off the 
bench points. 

" we have Lake Forest bn'Friday 
and Wauconda on Saturday to try 
and turn things around for us," 
Dresser added. "We have four games 
left in the season, so were just going 
to pick ourselves up and get ready to 

go." 

On Friday, Lake Forest will visit 
Antioch while the Sequoits will hit the 
road on Saturday and travel to Wau- 
conda. Antioch only has four more 
regular season games left in the year,* 
before facing of in the IHSA regional 
tournament, which Antioch is ranked' 
as the number eight seed. 

In a bit of irony, Lake Forest is 
ranked ninth in regional tournament 
and will face Antioch, in Antioch, the 
first week of March. 




Antioch senior Pat Straub goes in hard for a I ay up against North 
Chicago last week. —Photo by Steve Young 



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February 12, 1999 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A"i 1 



YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY ASSN. 



League standings 
Graffesl-2 

Western Conference 

Central Division 



2 Maplclcafs 

3 Blues 

I Blackhawks ; 

4 Moose 

5 Redwings 
B Wolves 

7 Hurricanes 
Pacific Division 

II Kings 

12 Sharks 

16 Avalanche 

13 Ducks 
9. Flames 
10 Canucks 
M Oilers 

15 Coyotes 

Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Islanders 

22 Lightning 

23 Admirals 

24 Grizzlies • 
IB Rangers 

17 Flyers • 
lBCapitats 

20 Panthers 

North East Division 

28 Predators 

25 Canadiens 
27 Bruins 

30 Whalers 

31 Dragons 

29 Sabres 

26 Penguins 

32 Thunder ' 
Grades 3-4 
Western Conference 
Central Division 

7 Hurricanes 

8 Wolves 

1 Blackhawks 

4 Moose 

5 Redwings 
.6 Vipers 

'3 Blues 

2 Maplcleafs 

9 Jets 

Pacific Division 

10 Flames 

16 Coyotes 
15 Oilers 
IB Stars 

1 1 Canucks 

12 Kings 

13 Sharks 

14 Ducks 

17 Avalanche 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

21 Capitals 



W 

4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 

4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
I 



4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 





5 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
I 
1 


3' 

3 

2 

3 

2 

2 

2 







L TPts 

8 









1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 



6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 



.0 9 



1 

1 1 

2 



3 
3 
3 
3 





1 
1 
2 
3 
4 
4 


1 
I 
1 
2 
3 
4 
4 




1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

o' 

2 

2 
2 
3 
3 
1 
4 










7 
5 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 



7 
7 
6 
6 
4 
2 





1 
1 



















8 
6 
6 
6 
4 
2 





1 
1 


2 
1 
1 



2 
I 
3 


1 


4 



11 

7 

6 

6 

6 

5 

3 

2 



8 

7 
7 
6 
5 
4 
4 
4 
I 1 



5 10 



26 Grizzlies 

23 Islanders 

19 Flyers 

25 Admirals 

24 Lightning 

20 Rangers 

27 Cyclones 
. 22 Panthers 

North East Division 

34 Dragons 

31 Predators 

28 Canadfcns 

29 Penguins 

35 Thunder, 

36 Senators 

32 Sabres 

33 Whalers 

30 Bruins 

Grades 5-6 
. Western Conference 
Central Division 

3 Moose 

4 Redwings 
2 Maple leafs 

5 Vipers 

7 Wolves 

I Blackhawks 

6 Hurricanes 
Pacific Division 

II Sharks 

12 Ducks 

13 Coyotes 

10 Kings 

8 Flames 

14 Avalanche 

9 Canucks. 
Eastern Conference 
Atlantic Division 

15 Flyers 

20 Admirals 

18 Islanders 

19 Lightning. 

21 Grizzlies 

16 Rangers 
17Panthers 
North East Division 

27 Whalers 

24 Bruins 

22 Canadiens 

23 Penguins 

26 Sabres 

25 Predators 

28 Thunder 
Grades 7-8 
Western Conference 
Western Division 

18 Thunder 

13 Coyotes 

11 Rangers 

15 Bruins . 

19 Panthers 

17 Predators 

14 Flyers 

12 Lightning 

16 Moose 
20Cvclones 



4 1 

3 1 

3 2 

3 3 

2 2 

1 4 

I 4 

5 





1 


1 






8 
7 
6 
G 
5 
2 
2 




5 
4 

4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 




4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 


4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 



5 
4 

2 
2 
2 
2 

1 

5 

3 

3. 

2 

2 









1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
4 
5 



2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
4 
5 

1 

2 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 





2 
2 
2 
3 
4 



2 
'2 
2 
2 
4 



1 11 



1 










9 

8 

6 

4 

4 

T 

2 

0- 



8 

1 7 
6 



I 








1 
1 






5 

4 
4 


8 
6 
G 
5 
5 
4 
2 



10 
B 



5 
4 
4 
4 
2 

10 

8 

7 

5 

4 

3- 






Working for the pin 

Tom Hart of Antfoch Community High School. wrestles Grant's Chris Ohlin during the IHSA Regional 
Wrestling Tournament Saturday at Grayslake Community High School.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Retired race promoter Gordon Sill remembered 



Gordon (Silianofl) Sill, 75 of An- 
tioch, retired promoter of Waukegan 
Speedway passed away Jan. 28, 1999 
at Victory Lakes. Continuing Care 
Center in Lindenhurst, 

Sill, born Aug. 16, 1923 in Nor- 
ridge, the son of the late Chris and 
Lucille Silianoff, expanded upon his 
great love for author racing as a hob- 
by when he formed Lake County 
Racing, Inc., taking over promotion , 



of Waukegan Speedway in mid-sea- 
son 1963. Along with his wife, Lor- 
raine, and many other family mem- . 
bers and friends, operated 
Waukegan. Speedway until Its clo- 
sure at the conclusion of the 1979 
season. 

Known for Saturday and Sunday 
events,, plus periodic specials, the 
hardworking Sill also managed to 
work as a union carpenter, custom 



home builder, storm window/door 
installer and auto towing business 
owner. 

Funeral services were held Jan. 
31 at Strang Funeral Home in Anti- 
och, with final disposition private 
with cremation. Donations may be 
made to Alzheimer's Assn. Greater 
Chicagoland Chapter, 4709 Golf Rd., 
Suite 1015; Skokle, JL "60076 or Anti- 
och Rescue Squad in his memory. 




Lake vuxA 

Township 

AGE LEVELS FOR 
FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADING 

7-8 ■ yr. old - Bantam 
9-10 yr. old - Pee Wee 
11-12 yr. old - Peathexweight 
12-13 yr. old - lightweigjit 
13-14 yr. old -Varsity 



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March Registration 
at State Bank of the Lakes, Lindenhurst 

Wednesday, March 17th 6-8 p.m. 
Saturday, March 20 9 -Noon 

April Registration 

Wednesday, April 21st 6-8 p.m. 
Saturday, April 24th 9 -Ncx 

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A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



February 12, 1999 






■ 



■ ■■ 



I 



A Wulf 




Grant's scholar athlete Eric Wulf 
combines book smarts with athletic skills 



ByLEERLAS 
Staff Reporter 



Don't blink because it might be 
over. 

In that split-second that it takes 
to close and open your eyes, Eric 
Wulf will have his opponent 
pinned. 

" I would say he's one of the best 
160-pounders in the state," said 
Dave Kapraun, Grant High School 
Bulldogs wresding coach. "I would 
say it's safe to assume that." 

But the "Wulf-man" is so much 
more than that. 

So much more. 

Aside from the fact that he is in 
the upper echelon of wrestlers in 
the state, Wulf is a scholar athlete— 
in the strictest sense of the term. 

The grades are important to 
me," Wulf explained. "My parents 
are really supportive of the grades 
I've pulled. They care about the 
other stuff to, but they really like the 
grades." 

And, so do the colleges. Wulf 
currently is deciding between a 
handful of midwestern division one 
schools, tenderly leaning toward a 
certain school in Iowa. 

"I haven't made up my mind 
yet," Wulf explained. "I will after 
wrestling season. I want to get 



through this first." 

Wulf is currently ranked fourth 
In his class in grade point average, a 
number that staggers him to this 
day. 

"I didn't think I'd do as much as 
1 have in high school," Wulf said, re- 
flecting on the past four years. "I 
never thought I'd be able to keep up 
the grades I did for four years." 

Which, in many ways is a trib- 
ute to the type of person the "Wulf- 
man" Is. He's a fighter. 

"I don't like going half-assed 
into anything," Wulf explained. "I 
want excel in everything I do." 

Wulf excelled as a defensive 
back, playing football for the 5 : 4 
Bulldogs this year, and considers 
himself a decent defensive short- 
stop on the Bulldogs baseball team 
as well. 

."I don't like knowing that any- 
one is better than me at anything," 
Wulf explains. "So, I do whatever it 
is until I do it right." 

Which means that Wulf likes 
practice as much as he loves com- 
petition. So he works at whatever he 
does, usually with the help of oth- 
ers, to do it until it's done right. 

"Usually, Wulf and (Grant . 
wresUer Jim) Gibbs work together 
in practice," Kapraun explains. "At 
the beginning of the season, Gibbs 




Eric Wulf, with a wrestling record of 31-0 at Grant High School in Fox Lake, ponders which college 
to go to next year as he relaxes during a break at the IHSA Regional Wrestling Tournament at 
Grayslake Community High School Saturday.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



knew he had to improve or he'd get 
beat up on by Eric all year. So, Gibbs 
got toughen" 

The learning experience of 
wrestling with Wulf has paid off for 
Gibbs. This year, Gibbs is having his 
best wresding year to date, posting a 
28-2 record with five pins. 

"He's wresding me and Eddie 
(Michneiwicz) in practice every day," 
Wulf explained, smiling. "And we 
just beat the crap out of him. So, yea, 
I think that's helped him get tougher 
which helped him get better." 

And, in the process the team 
has gotten better - better to the tune 



if. 



Our reputation 
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STATE 
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Our pediatric specialists arc, too. For the past year, we've been serving the families 
of northern Illinois at our Children's Hospital Clinics in Gurncc. Our clinic is easy 
to reach, whether you're from Crystal Lake, Dcerficld, Evanston, Winnetka or any- 
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Parents in northern Illinois have been bringing their children to Children's Hospital 
of Wisconsin for years. Now, we're coming to you. 

Ask your pediatrician about Children's Hospital Clinics, or call (847) 662-4380 for 
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of a 16-1 record and ranked 24th In 
state. 

"Eric can only get us six points 
in every meet," Kapraun warned. 
"But, he's got a great cast of charac- 
ters surrounding him. They are a 
great group of kids." , . 

With a team that has Robert 
Reyes at 30-3, Joe Michneiwicz at 
24-0, Charlie Jasinski at 31-1, Ed 
Michneiwicz at 25-5, Kyle Stark at 
22-6 and Anthony Johnson at 24-7, 
the great cast of characters have 
been performing as well as can be. 

And Eric, according to Kapraun, 
is the leader of the pack. 

"Eric is definitely the leader of 
the team," Kapraun said. "He leads, 
by example rather than words, and 
the kids respect him for that." 

However, one on the biggest in- 
justices in the stellar season the 
Bulldogs have put together is that 
their leader has not been recog- 
nized for his accomplishments. The 
Wulf-man has not been ranked by 



the powers who know in state. 

"That's just the way I like it," 
Wulf explained with a smile on his 
face. "I'm right where I want to be. 
No one knows me." 

"I've seen the kids that are 
ranked and I'm not that impressed 
by them." 

And why should he be? Wulf, at 
31-0 with 21 pins and 91 take- < 
downs, has been taken off his feet 
only once in 31 matches. . 

"Yea, I just found that out. It's 
pretty impressive," Wulf said, smil- 
ing again. "But it's not that big of a 
deal. We'll see what happens when 
state rolls around." . 

So, on Saturday, Feb,;13,<wheni j 
the crowd zooms in to watch 160™ ■ 
pounders fight for first in the sec- 
tionals, don't blink. 

The Wulf-man won ' t wait for . . ■ 
the crowd to find their seats and 
setUe in with the popcorn and soda-, 
in hand. By that time, he may have : 
already won the sectional tide. 



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■* February 12, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 'A1 3 



i 

- 




Chiefs 



Grayslake resident signs to play 

City Chiefs 




ByADRIANAMERCADO 
Staff Reporter 




or many teams and players 
this has been the year for 
change, 

" - For Grayslake resident 
James Parrish, former offensive 
tackle for the Chicago Bears, the 
winds of change have arrived. Last 
week, Parrish decided to sign a two- 
year contract with the Kansas City 
Chiefs, calling an end to his brief re- 
tirement. 

"I am excited." Parrish said. 
"They're a good team and hopefully' 
I am a piece of the puzzle." 

Parrish, with his wife Jennifer, 
have decided to stay in the 
Grayslake area for the time being. 

"I've had an opportunity to live 
in a lot of places and this is truly a 
great community." Parrish said, "I 
love living by the College of Lake 
County." 

The location of CLC and the var- 
ious shopping plazas in the 
Grayslake area were all good rea- 
sons for Parrish to remain a 
Grayslake resident. 

Parrish decided to get back into 
professional football after his brief 
retirement because of his desire to 
compete and his love of the game of 
football. 

"It's a lot of fun. It's craft— it's 
somethingyou can work at , and I 
just enjoy making 320-pound de- 
fensive linemen unhappy.". 

iiTo return to action, Parrish be- 
gan training at The Exercise Place in 
Grayslake everyday; 

.-"-' "I believe in supporting the 
communityand local businesses," 
said'Parfish''™* ' ' ( " i 

Part of that process also in- 
volved spiritual conditioning from 
the local football teams. 

"When they (area high school 
and CLC football players) play they 
don't have to worry about mone- 
tary issues or material things, they ■ 
just play for the love it. It's just fun 
to develop the spirit for my game 
just by watching those guys," said 
Parrish. 

It's a spirit' that for over seven- 
teen-years has kept the 6-5, 300- 
pound offensive lineman in and 
around the game. 

"When you're younger they put 
.weights on little players, because 
"they don't want they're eighty 
pound kid getting hit by a hundred 
fifty pound kid," said Parrish about 
his considerable size as a youth 
football player. 

"They didn't even want me to 
play when I was thirteen playing in 
a fourteen and seventeen year-old 
league," added Parrish. 

Parrish said early adversity, has 
helped him strive even harder to 
achieve his goals. 

Parrish, who graduated from' 
Temple University in Philadelphia, 
said he was recruited on a fluke and 
did not expect to have the opportu- 
nity to pla"y in the National Football 



League. » 

He said the scouts were there 
watching two other players and 
they happened to notice him. 

"I still, remember my first con- 
versation with my scout— I still have 
the piece of paper," said Parrish. 

Parrish's luck managed to con- 
tinue all the way through Supcrbowl 
XXVIII, when he won a Superbowl 
ring with the Dallas Cowboys, in 
1994 

. Tills accomplished player has 
tackled many angles in football, but 
the mere mention of the word fa- 
therhood elicits more fear than a 
raging, rushing defensive lineman — 
the Parrishes are expecting their 
first child any day now, and James 
knows he'll have at least two fans in 
Grayslake cheering him on as he 
takes the field for the Kansas City 
Chiefs. • 

"But he didn't was to miss being 
around (the baby)," added Jennifer. 

James said he hopes to retire on 
his terms this time, possibly with 
another Superbowl ring, and defi- 
nitely with another football fan 
roaming the Parrish household. 




At The Exercise Place in Grayslake, James Parrish of Grayslake signs an NFL player contract offered 
by the Kansas City Chiefs. Parrish is an offensive tackle who played collegiately with Temple and 
professionally with the Pittsburgh Steelers, the Dallas Cowboys (where he won a Super Bowl cham- 
pionship ring) -and the Chicago Bears. —Photo byLynnGunnarson Dahlstrom. 



Lady Panthers survive scare 



Along lay-off almost spelled dis- 
aster for the Round Lake Lady Pan- 
thers on Monday during the first 
round of the "Spirit of the Northwest 
Tournament" held at Round Lake 
High School on Monday night. 

When push came to shove in the 
fourth quarter, however, sophomore 
Jenny Maleug pushed the hardest, 
scoring 12 of her game high 15 down 
the stretch against Grant to yank the 
18-5 Panthers over the hump. 

"We almost had' them there," 
said Roger Lass, Grant girls basket- 
ball coach. "We played a great game 



for three and a half quarters, but just 
couldn't stop them down the 
stretch." 

Round Lake, who hasn't played 
since Jan. 26, tried to put the game 
away early in the second quarter, 
running out to a 25-15 lead at the 
half, but.Grant (8-17) just wouldn't 
go away and rallied in the third to 
keep the"game close. . 

Grant's spunky defense, who's 
tallest player is 5-8, managed to take 
control in the third, holding Round 
Lake to eight points in the quarter 
while putting up 12 to close the gap. 




aving i 





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A14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Roberts Road Mini Storage 

P.O. Box 300-40 15 Robert* Road 

Island Uko, IL 60042 
847-407-8873 

Notice Is hereby given that on 
2/25/99 at 9:30am, a sale will be held 
at 4015 Roberts Road, Island Lake, of- 
fice location Is 4001 Roberts Road, to 
sell the following to enforce a lien ex- 



LEGAL NOTICES 



February 12, 1999 



i 



l sting under the laws ol the Stale of Illi- 
nois against such articles for labor, ser- 
vice, skill or material extended upon a 
storage furnished for such articles at 
the request of the following: 

Unit No 608 belonging to Patricia 
Dahlqulst consisting ol miscellaneous 
Items. 

0199B-2438-WL 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 



Estate of 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

PROBATE DIVISION 



MARTHA J. BALFE 
Deceased. 



No. 98P803 



CLAIM NOTICE 

Notice Is given of the death of MARTHA J. BALFE. of Spring Grove. Illinois. Letters 
of office were Issued on September 4, 1 998, to MARIANNE MALZACHER 844 Juniper 
Rd.. Qlonview, IL 60025 whose attorney Is QANTAR & DEMARTINI, LTD. P.O. Box 
595, 382 Lake Street, Anlloch, IL 60002. 

Claims against tho estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court 
at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085, Room C-307 or with representative, 
or both, on or before March 4, 1999, which date is not less than 6 monlh3 from the date 
of the first publication of this notice and any claim not filed within that period Is barred. 
Copies of any claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the represen- 
tative and to the attorney wllhln 10 days after it Is filed. 



(Representative) 

/s/R. DeMartlnl 

(Attorney) 

. O199D-2402-FL 

January 29, 1999 

February 5, 1999 

February 12, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Concrete Re- 
moval Specialist 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2310 Hon- 
eysuckle CI., Undenhurst, IL 60046. 
(847) 356-9075. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mike Welnand. 2310 Honeysuckle Ct., 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. (847) 356-9075. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locations) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person (s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/MJko Welnand, January 22, 1999. 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by (he per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 1999. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Barbara J. Erskln 

Notary Public 

Received: January 22, 1999 

Wittard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0199A-2419-LV/LN 

February 5, 1999 

February 12, 1999 

February. 19, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: American Deck 

Tech 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2310 Hon- 
eysuckle Ct., Undenhurst, IL 60046. 
(847) 356-9075. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mike Welnand, 2310 Honeysuckle Ct., 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. (647) 356-9075. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
lntend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/MIke Welnand, January 22, 1999. 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 1 999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskln 
Notary Public 
Received: January 22, 1999 
Willard R, Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199A-2418-LV/LN 
Februan/5, 1999 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 



1V 



f 



Great Hiking Trails Minutes From 
Honolulu 

byJIMWARNKEN, 

President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

First a real quick geography lesson: The five major islands making up the Hawaiian 
chain arc, Kauai, Maui, the island of Hawaii (the "Dig Island"), Molokai and finally the . 
Island of Oahu, where you'll find the capital city of Honolulu and Waikiki Beach. 

If it's your first visit to the islands, and you can only stay a week, you may want to 
spend your entire stay on Oahu and save the other islands for your next trip, and l 
guarantee you will go backL.To be honest, Oahu is a little too "touristy" for me. 
However, it is home to Pearl Harbor, Waikiki Beach, Diamond Head and many other 
"must see" sites for the first-lime visitor. 

You can still get away from the crowds of tourists who flock to Waikiki Beach, and 
explore nature by taking advantage of Honolulu's network of hiking trails which arc 
just minutes from the city. You don't even need to rent a car to reach Honolulu's trails 
as most are accessible by city bus. 

Let's start .with a hike to the top of Hawaii's most famous landmark. If you think 
the view of Diamond Head is spectacular from Waikiki Beach, you should sec the 
beach from atop Diamond Head! It's actually a very easy 30 -minute hike to the top of 
Diamond Head via a trail, within the interior of the crater. At the end of the trail is an 
old artillery bunker where you'll climb a few steps and come out through the opening 
where the guns used to be. Be ready for a breathtaking view of the city of Honolulu. 

Who hasn't dreamed of swimming in a tropical pool below a waterfall? Another 
easy mile-long trait will take you to the base of Manoa Falls where you can do just that. 

The 1. 3 mile Judd Trail, which runs along the Nuuanu Creek, also offers the casual 
hiker a chance for a dip' in the Jackass Ginger Pool at the trail's end. 

For the more adventurous, the Lanipo/Mau'umae Trail offers those in good shape a 
four-to-sjx-hour hike to the 2,600-foot summit of the Koolaus Mountains. There you'll 
be treated to a panoramic view of Diamond Head, Waikiki and most of Oahu's leeward 
coast. - 

For a map of Honolulu's trails, write to The State Division of Forestry and Wildlife, 
1 15 1 Punchbowl St. Km. 325, Honolulu, HI 96813. Include a 9x12 envelope with 
$1.01 postage. You can also call them at 808-587-0166 for recommcndations'of 
escorted hikes: <ftAV£> 



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STAR 



CRUISES 

Lindenhurst 

www.northstartravel.com 



'i, 




• II It 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Wauconda 
Sell- Service Storage 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 500 S. 
Rand Road, Wauconda, IL 60064. 
(847) 526-5055. (street) P.O. Box 505, 
Wauconda, IL 60004, 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
George Gallagher, 1020 S. Fleming 
Rd„ Woodstock, IL 60098. (815) 338- 
6763. Doris Davis Gallagher, 1020 S. 
Fleming Rd., Woodstock, IL 60098. 
(815)338-6763. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locations) Indicated 
and that the true or real full namo(s) of . 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/George Gallagher, February 2,1999 
The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per* 
son(s) intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 2nd day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Phyllls Kelnz 
Notary Public 
Received: February 2, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2427-WL 
February 12, 1999 
* February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



. PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: American Deck 
Tech 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 231 Hon- 
eysuckle Ct., Undenhurst, IL 60046.. 
(847) 356-9075. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mike Welnand, 2310 Honeysuckle Ct., 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. (847)356-9075. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Miko Welnand, January 22, 1999. 

The foregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 1 999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskln 
Notary Public 
" " Received: January 22, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2395-LV/LN 
January 29, 1999 
February5, 1999 
February 12, 1999 



• PUBUC NOTICE- 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Concrete Re- 
moval Specialist 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2310 Hon- . 
eysuckle Ct., Undenhurst, IL 60046. 
(847) 356-9075. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mike Welnand, 2310 Honeysuckle Ct., 
Undenhurst, IL 60046. (847) 356-9075. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) • 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Mike Welnand, January 22, 1999. 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskln 
'\ Notary Public 
Received: January 22, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2394-LV/LN 
• January 29, 1999 
Februarys, 1999 
February 12, 1999 



To Subscribe To Your 
Hometown News 
Call 740-4055 

Lakelkad 

Newspapers 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING ON 
ROAD DISTRICT BUDGET 
Notice Is hereby given that a Tenta- 
tive Budget and Appropriation Ordi- 
nance for the Anlloch Road District, In 
tho County of Lake, State of Illinois, for 
the fiscal year beginning February 1, 
1999 and ending January 31, 2000 will 
bo on file and conveniently available to 
the public for Inspection at the Antloch 
Township Office, 99 Route 173, Anll- 
och, Illinois 60002 on the 23 day of 
February 1999. 

Notice la further given hereby that a 
public hearing on said Budget Appro- 
priation Ordinance wilt be held at 7:30 
P.M., the 25 day of March, 1999 at the 
Antloch Township Office In the Antloch 
Township Road District and the final 
hearing and action on this ordinance 
will be taken at this hearing. 

Kathleen M. Smith 

Antloch Township Clerk 

0199B-2432-AN 

February 12, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS ' 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Performance 
Auto Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 382 Undy 
St., Ingleslde, IL 60041. (847) 587- 
0308. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Todd Mueller, 382 Undy St., Ingleslde, 
IL 60041. (847) 587-0308. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
!ntend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Todd Mueller, January 15,1999 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 15th day of January, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/David J. Leeney 
Notary Public 
Received: January 19, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199D-2405-LV 
January 29, 1999 
February 5, 1 999 
February 12, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING ON 
TOWNSHIP BUDGET 
Notice Is hereby given that a tenta- 
tive Budget and Appropriation Ordi- 
nance for Antloch Township In County 
of Lake, State of Illinois, for the fiscal 
year beginning February 1, 1999 and 
ending January 31 , 2000 will be on file 
and conveniently available to public in- 
. spectlon at the Anlloch Township Of- 
fice from and after 8:30 AM. on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1999. 

Notice Is further hereby that a pub- 
lic hearing on said Budget and Appro- 
priation Ordinance will be held at 7:45 
o'clock P.M. on the 25th day of March, 
1 9999 at the Antloch Township Office, 
99 Route 173, Anlloch, Illinois In this 
Township and the final action on the 
Ordinance will be taken at this hearing. 
Kathleen M. Smith 
Antloch Township Clerk 
0199B-2433-AN 
February 12, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Utile BIstrp Po- 
ems 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1203 Tyler 
Court, Lake Villa, IL 60046. (647) 265- 
7580. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
MeMn Oscar Pflug, 1203 Tyler Court, 
Lake Villa, IL 60046. (847) 265-7580. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/MetvIn O. Pflug, Februarys, 1999 
. The foregoing Instrument was, ac- 
knowledged before me .by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of February, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Barbara J. Erskln 
Notary Public 
Received: February 3, 1999 
Willard R. Helander ' 
Lake County Clerk 
0199B-2421-LV 
February 12, 1999 
February 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 



> 



PUBUC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ■ 

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION 

Board of Education of Antloch Community High School District No. 117, 

Plaintiff 
v. 
Heritage Standard Bank and Trust Company, et al.. Defendants 
Case No.: 98 ED 21 
The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV- 
EN YOU, FRANK JOHN GAVIN, Defendant In the above-captloned suit, that a Com- 
plaint to .Condemn Property was filed on September 3, 1998, in the Circuit Court for 
the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, Lake County, Illinois, by the above-named Plaintiff 
against you, praying the Court for the condemnation of the following properties: 

PARCEL 1; 

THE NORTH 29 ACRES OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTH WEST 
QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF 
THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, (EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF DE- 
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT A POINT ON THE 
WEST LINE OF SAID HALF QUARTER SECTION 298.75 FEET SOUTH OF 
THE NORTH WEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EAST PARALLEL WITH 
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER, 253.25 FEET; • 
THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID HALF QUAR- 
TER SECTION, 320 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT 75 FEET EAST 
OF THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF PREMISES CONVEYED TO TRUSTEE 
OF GRAVE YARD BY DEED RECORDED JANUARY 19, 1 861 , IN BOOK 32 
OF DEEDS, PAGE 283 AND 284; THENCE WESTERLY TO THE SOUTH 
WEST CORNER OF SAID PREMISES CONVEYED BY SAID DEED AND 

• THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID HALF QUARTER SEC- 
TION TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART THERE- 
OF, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE 
WEST LINE OF SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER 644 FEET SOUTH OF THE 
NORTH WEST CORNER, THENCE EAST 109.4 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 
287 FEET. THENCE WEST 109.3 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF THE 
NORTH WEST QUARTER; THENCE NORTH 283 FEET TO THE PLACE OF 
BEGINNING AND EXCEPT THAT PART THEREOF FALLING IN STATE AID, 
ROUTE NO. 18) IN LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS. 

. THAT PART OF THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWN- 
SHIP AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED.AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: 
COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 22; 
THENCE NORTH 66 RODS; THENCE EAST 80 RODS; THENCE SOUTH 68 
RODS AND THENCE WET BO RODS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

PARCEL 3; 

THAT PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWN- 
. SHIP AND RANGE AFORESAID, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: 
COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF 
THE SOUTH WEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22; THENCE NORTH 28 
RODS; THENCE EAST 40 RODS; THENCE SOUTH 28 RODS; THENCE 

• WEST 40 RODS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, IN LAKE COUNTY ILLI- 
NOIS. 

PARCEL 4: 

THAT PART OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWN- 
SHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, 
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE WEST UNE 
OF SAID NORTH WEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 27, 644 FEET 
SOUTH OF THE NORTH WEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTH 87 
DEGREES 45 MINUTES EAST 109.4 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 287 FEET; 
THENCE WEST 109.3 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTH WEST 
QUARTER; THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID WEST UNE 283 FEET TO THE 
PLACE OF BEGINNING (EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE WEST 33 FEET), 
IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

Unless you, FRANK JOHN GAVIN, file your answer or otherwise make your ap- 
pearance In this suit In the office of the Clerk of the Court of the Nineteenth Judicial 
Circuit, Lake County, Illinois, on or before March 1 2, 1 999, a trial may be held and judg- 
ment may be entered against you for the relief prayed in the Complaint. 

(SEAL) 
/s/ Sally D.Coffelt 
0199B-2423-AN 
February 12, 1999 
February, 19, 1999 
February 26, 1999 




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February 12, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 5 



Germans' annual dance 
at VFW Hall, Feb. 20 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

The German American Club of 
Antioch will host its annual Mas- 
querade Dance, or Faschings Bali, 
Saturday, Feb. 20 at the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Sequoit Post 4551 hall 
at % North' Avenue. 

■ "Join us for an evening of Gmut- 
lichkeit," said Susan Tanaschovsky,, 
the club's corresponding secretary. 
The doors open at 7 p.m., the 
evening starts .at 8 p.m., and the 
dance may end at midnight. 

"If the people don't want to 
leave, it will go to one {o'clock),"-said. 
Dolores Eberle, a club member. "We 
have anywhere from 100 to 150 peo- 
ple on this particular dance." 

If, the weather is nice. 

"We've been very lucky with 
weather," she said. 

The ball. is an evening of fun 
with dancing to live music, some 
snack foods, and conversation with 



friends. The bar is even stocked with 
some imported beers from Ger- 
many. 

Guests are encouraged to wear 
costumes, but it is not required. 

There will be monetary prizes for 
several costume categories such as 
for the best couple, the best single, 
person, the funniest costume. 

Music will be provided by the 
Talismann. "We have them every 
year," said Eberle. It is a popular 
group with the club members. 

"The club is 20 years old this 
year," said Eberle, The dance itself 
has been sponsored for about 15 
years. 

Tickets cost SB for everyone. 
"Tickets are not sold in advance," 
Eberle said; "They're at the door." 

" People who want more informa- 
tion can call Tanaschovsky at 395- 
• 5008 or Eberle at 356-7322. 

The VFW Hail is a quarter mile 
east of Route 83 on North Avenue in 
Antioch. 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



St. Peter's School to raffle 
Blazer for classroom space 



St. Peter's School Extension 2000 
Development Program will receive a 
major financial boost from proceeds 
from the raffle of a new 1998 Blazer 
donated by Raymond Chevrolet 
Oldsmobile, of Antioch. 

Thewinning raffle ticket will be 
pulled July 10 at the Parish's annual 
block party. Between now and then, 
St. Peter's School. families, local fi- 



nancial institutions, and Raymond 
Chevrolet Oldsmobile are selling$10 
raffle tickets. 

The Extension 2000 Develop- 
ment Program seeks to build four 
new classrooms and a teacher's work 
area for SL Peter's grade school chil- 
dren. 

For additional information call 
395-0037. 



Child literacy took a step forward 
with donation of 150 books to four 
organizations in northern Lake '. 
County. 

The books were presented per- 
sonally by Illinois Dist. 62 State Rep- 
resentative Tim Osmond on Mon- 
day, Feb. 8. 

Osmond donated the books to 
Howe Grade School, in Beach Park, 
Mt. Zion Baptist Church, in Zion, 
Oakland Grade School, in Antioch, 
and the Greater Faith Baptist 
Church, in Waukegan , 

Chris Holmstrem accepted the 
books at Howe. She is the coordina- 
tor of the Center for Early Childhood 
Development at the school. 

Lou Lewis at Mt. Zion, who coor- 
dinates the Pre-school and After 
School Program, also accepted do- 
nated books. 

At Oakland, Janet Behling ac- 
cepted books for the Center for Ear- 
ly Education and Development. She ' 
is a pre-kindergarten coordinator - 
and teacher at the center. 

"I jntend on making literacy and 
early childhood development one of 
my priorities as I serve as state repre- 
sentative," said Osmond. 

"There will be many bills regard- 
ing education voted on by the Gen- 
eral Assembly this spring, but I feel it 
is possible for all of us to make a dif- 
ference in a child's development by 
reading to them or becoming in- 
volved in other ways," he said. 

Behling said, "Children beingread 
to by teachers, parents, volunteers, se- 
niors is probably the most important 
single thing we can do for.them." 

"1 am veryappreclative of Rep- 
resentative Osmond's gift and it will 
certainly help to give additional op- 
portunities for those involved in pur 




State Representative Tim Osmond (R- Dist. 62) reviews books 
with Janet Behling at Oakland Grade School that he donated to 
the school. She is a Pre-kindergarten Coordinator for a program 
that sets a foundation for future childhood learning success — 
Photo by Kenneth Patchen 



program," she said. "The Pre- 
kindergarten program sets the foun- 
dation for future learning and acad- 
emic success." 

"We're always open to donations 
from the community, particularly 
books," said Family Resource Coor- 
dinator Sharon Rench. 

Oakland Teacher Jori Grill said the 
books will be used quickly. "Some- 
times they're used for story time." . 

"We make some of our own 
books, sometimes, by looking at oth- 
er books," she said. 

Other teachers will be using the 
books as well as the home start pro- 
gram. 

"A lot of these books we don't 



have on our shelves," Grill said. 

"It isn't just me who can do- 
nate," said Osmond. "Everyone can 
donate." 

Osmond said that for informa- 
tion on how to donate new books or 
to volunteer at any of the district's lit- 
eracy groups, people can call his of- 
fice, 838-6200/to obtain additional 
information. 

The books were donated to Os- 
mond by friends who attended a re- 
cent surprise birthday party. 

"I was very pleased with the re- 
sponse we received, and I strongly 
encourage others to do the same," 
he said. "Everyone felt this was a 
• J great idea." 



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COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ / 




run at P 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

"Sleuth" offers the audience an 
opportunity to change Its mind at al- 
most any moment of the show. 

The play offers a good deal of 
tension as two central characters 
work out the mingled meaning of 
murder In a love triangle. 

For PM&Lboard member Matt 
Conkrite, the play offers the audi- 
ence a chance to seetwo actors who 
work, well together create tension 
through their differences. 

"Sleuth" continues Us run at 
PM&L Theater in Antloch tonight at 
8 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and 
$8 for seniors and students. The box 
office opens 90 minutes before cur- 
tain time. 

Steve Willding, of lindenhurst, 
and Jerod Howard\ of Fox Lake are 
two primary characters in a plot that 
focuses on a love triangle that culmi- 
nates in murder. The affair is be- 
tween a woman, an older man, and a 
younger man. 

The play won the Best Play 
Award of the Drama Critics Circle. 
The New York Post newspaper de- 
scribed it as "Ingenius skullduggery. 
. . replete with skillful suspense and 
inventive tricks." 

A famous mystery writer, Steve 
Willding, in his English country 
home, encounters a young man he 
knows wants to marry his wife. 
Scotch fuels the dialogue as it turns- 
into a suspenseful encounter be- 
tween an older writer and a younger 
guest. 

"The two primary characters, 



like the actors who portray them, dif- 
fer in age, attitude, and vocabulary," 
said Matt Conkrite. "Although this - 
difference will create a lot of tension 
on stage, it seems to be one of the 
reasons that the actors work so well 
together." 

"In my opinion, when any cast 
gets along well together, It makes for 
a richer theatrical experience for the 
audience," Conkrite said. 

"During a visit to one of the rc : 
hearsals, I found that there was little 
or no conception of an age gap 
among anyone," he said. 

Conkrite said that both actors 
Andrew Wyke and Jerod Howard en- 
joy being on stage with the older 
Steve Willding. They can break the 
seriousness of rehearsal dialogue 
with jokes. 

"Not unlike their characters in 
the play, they try to outdo each oth- 
er," Conkrite said. "Because of this 
type of relationship, the cast and 
crew of "Sleuth" are building up for a 
very entertaining show." 

The opportunity to see "Sleuth," . 
by Anthony Schaffer, will stretch 
through the first three weekends of 
February. The play is at B p.m. oh Fri- 
days and Saturdays, Feb. 12, 13, 19, 
and 20. On Sundays, Feb. 14, and 21, 
there is a matinee presentation at 
2:30 p.m. 

Reservations can be made with 
by telephone at 395-3055 or at the 
box, office at Orchard Avenue and 
Main Street Box office hours are 530 
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Monday 
through Thursday. On Saturdays, the 
box office is open from 11 a.m. to 2 
p.m. 




Former State Representative Robert Churchill has received recognition for his contributions to help 
strengthen the Lindenhurst Park District and to build Millennium Park. Park District Directors gave 
the award Tuesday, Feb. 2. Offering congratulations are, from left, Warren Shadron Jr., Lindenhurst 
Mayor. Paul Baumunk, Churchill, Mary Jo Suhar, Board President Harry Omartian, and Dean Park- 
man.— Photo by Kenneth Patchen 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Lindenhurst Park District board 
members conveyed an award to for- 
mer State Representative Robert 
Churchill (R-Dist 62). It is granted 
by* the Illinois Association of Park 
Districts and the Illinois Park and 
Recreation Association. 

Churchill received the 1998 
Community Service Award for out- 
standing support to the Lindenhurst 
Park District. The award acknowl- 
edges, in part, the financial support 
he helped to secure from the stateof 
Illinois to create Millennium Park. 

"It's been a great honor, and we 
hope to see you around," said board 
. president Harry Omartian as he pre- 
sented the award. The award is given 



in recognition and appreciation 
of outstanding contributions and 
unselfish devotion for the advance- 
ment of parks, recreation, and 
leisure in die community and the 
State of Illinois." 

"It's through your assistance and 
: through the state that we have been 
able to develop as a district," said 
Omartian. 

"I was able to enjoy a very close re- 
lationshipwith the Illinois Association ] 
dfParkDIstrict for 16years," Churchill * 
said. "It means a lot to me to have this 
award and to receive this award." 

Lindenhurst Mayor Paul Bau- 
munk also thanked Churchill for his 
assistance to die community. Bau- 
munk said that the relationship be- 
tween the village, park district; and 
Churchill "are partnerships not 



■>*•* 



found In most communities." 

The award has been given to 
friends of the park district since 1992. 
The first recipient was John Miller, of 
Linden Barber Shop, who received 
the award for a variety of volunteer 
and financial support activities: That 
same year, the Lake Villa Township 
Lions Club received the award for 
the John Janega Memorial Park de- 
velopment 

There were two recipients in 
1993. Community Service Officer 
Ralph Goar received the award/ He 
is a police officer with the Linden- 
hurst Police Department. Mark 
Scarpelli, vice president and general 
manager of Raymond Chevrolet- 
pidsmobile, of Antloch, received 
recognition for his wide variety of 
support to the district 










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A1 3/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February- 12, 1999 




While enjoying the surroundings of RJ's Eatery in Lindenhurst dur 
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or Frank Loffredo talks with Merilee Miller. 



Julie Clausing and Marilyn Gregorin talk with Lindenhurst Village Trustee Fred Messmer. 



Far left, David Hartwig of Inter- 
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Scherer of Hastings Lake YMCA 
in Lindenhurst chat during the 
reception while immediate left, 
Ed Bouas of National City Bank 
mingles with Lakeland Newspa- 
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[bruary 12, 1999 




COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers* A"! 9 




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recover 

-, 

losttime 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Construction progress on Anti- 
och Community High School is very 
close to the projected schedule and 
costs are still within budget projec- 
tions. 

Board of Education members, 
school and district officials, and con- 
tractors toured new building areas 
Thursday, Feb. 4 to review progress 
on the school modernization project 

Lost time because of early Janu- 
ary snowstorms and frigid tempera- 
tures almost has been recovered dur- 
ing the past few weeks. 

Sub-contractor work continues 
to be high quality, according to con- 
struction management officials. 

; Business Manager Bill Ahlers 
summarized construction project 
revenue and expenditures for school 
board members, "We are still OK on 
this project from a cost and revenue • 
standpoint," Ahlers said. 

I "The library and office roof steel 
j Is on," said Glno Ricchio, executive 
vice president for Seater Construc- 
tion Co., Inc. He serves as the projec- 
t's*! construction manager. "Things 
are going to really start to come to- 
gether here." 

Heavy snows and cold weather 
I affected placement of steel on thJB.11-;- 
I brary area in early January. The new 
I library area is where the school's for- 
Imer entrance on Main Street was lo- 

Icated. 

: Ricchio said that science, art, 

land home economics areas at the 
[north end of the building are sub- 
stantially, complete. "That is go- 
ling' very well. Jt Is even a little 
lahead." 

I Ricchio has consistently 
[praised the quality of the. work 
[done by subcontractors during 
Itheproject. 



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Left, Lakeland Newspapers reporter Ken Patchen talks with John Tierney, owner of Tierney Signs, 
Inc. in Antibch, during the Thank You banquet sponsored by Lakeland Publishers at RJ s Eatery in 
Lindenhurst Monday. Above, Rebecca Harling of National City Bank compares notes Monday 
evening with Jim Marshall of Anchor Bank. — Photos by Sandy Bressner 






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READERS GUIDE TO 





Answers to the most frequently asked questions about how the 

newspaper operates, how to reach us about a story, how to write a 

letter to the editor, and how to access our web site. 



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Q. What information can I submit to be 

published? 

A. Lakeland Newspapers encourages 
readers to submit stories and story 
ideas through NEWS RELEASES for the 
following: activities of service organiza- 
tions, news of awards and achieve- 
ments, programs open to the public, 
entertainment events, special church 
services and religious programs open 
to the public, and activities and ser- 
vices of interest to retirees. 

Q. How should I prepare a news 
release? 

A. Information of all types of news 
items should be submitted as a written 
news release to the appropriate depart- 
ment. Most editors cannot take infor- 
mation over the phone because of time 
constraints. News releases insure accu- 
racy and save time. 
The two most important points to 
remember are (1) to include all basic 
information in the first paragraph and 
(2) to list the name, and day and 
evening phone numbers of someone 
who may be contacted for additional 
information or clarification. News 
releases should be typed, double- 
spaced, on one side of an 8 1/2" by 11" 
sheet of paper and presented with the 
most important facts listed first. Be 
sure to double-check the spelling of all 
names, addresses and other facts. 
Avoid the need to publish phone num- 
bers if possible. 

Q. How can I get an announcement 
published? 

A. Lakeland Newspapers provides spe- 
cial forms for weddings, engagements 
and anniversaries. You may also 
arrange to have one of these n t ~* 
forms mailed to your home 
by calling Lakeland 
Publishers at (847) 223- 
8161. Birth announce- 
ment forms are available 
in all local hospitals. ; . 




Q. How do I submit a news release or 
announcement? 

A. News releases and completed 
engagement, wedding, anniversary and 
birth forms may be left with the recep- 
tionist at the front desk or mailed to 
the appropriate department at: 
Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. Whitney 
St., Grayslake, IL 60030. 
News releases also may be submitted 
by e-mail at edit@bid.cpm. 

Q. How do I get a letter to the editor in 
Lakeland Newspapers? 

A. Lakeland Newspapers welcomes let- 
ters to the editor. Please send letters to 
"Letters to the Editor," Lakeland 
Newspapers, 30 S. Whitney St., 

^Grayslake, IL 60030. You 

may e-mail your "Letter to 

\the Editor" to 

ledit@lnd.com. 
"All letters published must be 
typewritten, double-spaced and 
limited to 250 words. Letters must be 
signed and must include the writer's 
address and telephone number in case 
it is necessary to contact the author for 
information or clarification. "Name 
Withheld" letters will not be published. 
Priority is given to letters offering fresh 
perspectives and to letters that con- 
form to length and format expecta- . 
tions. Lakeland Newspapers also does 
not routinely publish "thank you" let- 
ters from one organization or individ- 
ual to another, but may carry such a 
message if the author is unable to con- 
tact the benefactor in any other way. 
Letters are subject to editing. 

Q. How can I get multiple copies of 
Lakeland Newspapers for classroom 
use? 

A Call circulation for delivery at 740-4035. 
Members of the editorial department 
will give tours of Lakeland Newspapers' 




wiiiiii 




facility to students, Members of 
Lakeland Newspapers will 
visit classrooms on request. 
Call for available times. 



Q. How can I advertise my 
business or organization? 

A. If you have a sale or event coming 
up or you just want your prospective 
customers to know how, where, why 
and what you do, Lakeland display ads 
are right for you! Get your message out 
by calling (847) 223-8161 and ask for 
the display advertising department. An 
experienced Account Executive for 
your area will help you to effectively 
reach your targeted market. 

Q. How can I buy back issues? 

A. Back issues are available if less than 
one year old. Mail orders must be paid 
in advance. For ordering procedure 
and cost, please call (847) 223-8161. 
Microfiche and microfilm of papers 
older than one year are available at 
most area public libraries. 

Q. How can I subscribe to Lakeland 
Newspapers? 

A. Lakeland Newspapers offers home 
delivery and mail subscriptions. For 
rates, call (847) 740-4035. 

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED 
AD IN ILLINOIS' 
FASTEST GROWING 
NEWSPAPER- 

If you're selling a 
house, a car or want 
to place a help want- 
ed ad, a classified ad can 
get your message out. Just call (847) 
223-8161 and ask for the classified 
department. Our experienced sales staff 
will help you to create an effective ad. 

Q. How can I access Lakeland 
Newspapers on my computet? 

A. If you are already connected to the : 
Internet and you wish to view Lakeland 
Newspapers on the World Wide Web, 
direct your browser to 
www.lpnews.com. To send e-mail to 
Lakeland Newspapers, the general 
addressisedit@lpnews.com. 

* 

Q. What can I find on Lakeland 
Newspapers' web site? 

A. In addition to finding the 
week's top local news sto- 
ries and classified ads, you 
can visit special online sec- 
tions. You can also place a 
classified ad, send a letter 
to the editor, e-mail ." 
Lakeland staff members, 
subscribe to the print edition of the 
paper or request permission to republish 
a story. 






■■*.*- j 1 >• ' 



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iebruary 12, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



• 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 



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CHS stages 

( j 

Little Prince' 



Production opens Feb. 17 



By KENNETH jWCHEN 
I Staff Reporter 

Antioch Community High 
I School drama students will present 
director Donna Shehom's adapta- 
tion of "The Little Prince" in mid- 
February. , 

, The play also may be a last op: 
portunity to see performances by a 
few graduating Seniors who have 
appeared in previous school pro- 
ductions. 

The play opens Thursday, Feb. 
18 with a performance at 7:30 p.m. 
There will be- additional perfor- 
mances on Friday and Saturday, 
Feb. 19 and 20. A matinee perfor- 
mance is scheduled for 2:30 p.m. 
on Sunday, Feb. 21. Tickets for stu- 
dents and senior citizens are $2. 
Adult tickets are $3. The play is in 
the ACHS auditorium'; 

"It's based on the children's 
story by'Ahtione De Saint-Exu- 
pery," Shehorn said. "I think it will 
be a charming, sweet, and tender 
show."" 

"It's very different from what 
we!vc done before," she said. "It's 
hot a comedy." 

"The Little Prince" is a story 
told from the point of view of a man 
who six years earlier had been a pi- 
lot. He crashes in the Sahara 
Desert. Out of nowhere, he meets a 
little prince. The prince proceeds to 
tell the pilot about his adventures. 

The prince has-mot. people who 

have taught him things. 
■ It is a fantasy story. 

"There are 23 in the cast," said 
Shehorh.'The four leads in the play 
are Bennie Woodell, Kyle Scott, 
Chelsey Mortenson, and Vita Gold. 

Woodell is the. pilot. He has 
previously appeared as theKing of 
Hearts in "Alice in Wonderland" 
and as Tully Bascum in "The 
Mouse that Roared." 

"He's doing a nice job, a really 



nice job," Shehorn said. "He has 
grown so much since his freshman 
year. He is a dedicated and de- 
pendable guy." 

Scott is the narrator in "The Lit- 
tle Prince.' 1 He was General Snippet 
in 'Mouse' and Sheridan Whiteside 
in "The Man Who Came to Din- ' 
ner." 

"Kyle is doing a marvelous job," 
Shehorn said. "He's got a large 
amount of line responsibility, and 
he's just doing a tremendous job." 

Mortenson is the prince/ She 
played the Secretary of State in 
'Mouse' and maid Sarah in 'Man." 
She was Alice In ! Alice." 

Vita Gold Is the prince's narra- 
tor. She has appeared as a secretary 
in "The Man Who Came to Din- 
ner," a diplomat in "The Mouse 
tha^Rbared," and a narrator in "Al- 
ice in Wonderland." 

Jennie Groth is the queen in 
"The Little Prince." . 

"She does a lovely job as the 
queen," said Shehorn. She too has 
appeared in all three previous pro- 
ductions. 

Other seniors in "The Little 
Prince" will be Ted Welker and Erin 
Brodey. 

"These six have been stalwarts 
for us," Shehom said. "But, we have 
some excellent freshmen coming 
up." 





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Scouts tour fire department 

Jim Tourney, Lake Villa Volunteer Fire Department, gave a tour to members of Undenhurst and Lake 
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/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 12, 1999 



Chain O'Lakes fishing derby forges ahead 



Warm weather 
won't cancel 
39th annual ice 
fishing derby 

i 

By SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 

A string of warm temperatures 
will not stop the 39th Annual Chain 
O' Lakes Ice Fishin' Derby and Win- 
ter Festival from taking place this 
weekend. 



The festival, sponsored by the 
Northern Illinois Conservation Club, 
Is scheduled for Saturday and Sun- 
day, Feb. 13 and 14, at three sites on 
the Chain— McDermit's Resort on 
Channel Lake, serving as festival and 
tournament headquarters, and two 
satellite sites, Pink Harrison's Resort 
on Pistakee Lake, and K & S. Kempfs 
on Petite Lake. 

Food and refreshments are avail- 
able at all locations. Tournament 
and festival hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Feb. 13, and 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Feb, 
14. 

Festival Co-Chairman Tom 
Pientka said the Ice only needs to be 




Call Lakeland Newspaper's 
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(847) 225-8161 



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4 inches thick for the tournament. 
However, If the tournament, will 
forge ahead, even if that Is not the 
case, 

"You have to use your own judg- 
ment," Pientka said. The fishing 
contestants can fish from anywhere, 
and are not limited to going out on 
the ice, should it not be safe enough. 

As many as 5,000 people are ex- 
pected to attend, with many valuable 
adult and children items up for auc- 
tion, and a lot of money to be won by 
fishermen and women. 

More than 1,000 hourly fishing 
prizes for big and small fish will be 
awarded, and $1,550 in cash prizes 
will be awarded to derby winners for 
big and small fish. Rules for the fish- 
ing derby will be posted at all claim- . 
ing stations. An ice shanty contest is 
being held as well, with the main fo- 
cus on the auction, featuring a top 
prize of a quality late model car do- 
nated by Raymond Chevrolet, of An- 
tioch. 

A children's auction is only open 
to children bidders, and in the past 
has included Beanie Babies and chil- 
dren's fishing tackle as auction 
items. 

The auction's begin at 2 p.m. 
Sunday at McDermit's Resort, the 
derby headquarters. Raffles will also 
be held, with tickets on sale at all fes- 
tival locations, and all major bait 
shops. 

There is no entry fee to the fes- 
tival, but everyone who pays the $2 
derby registration fee is automati- 
cally entered into the grand prize 
raffle. 

For more information, contact 
the conservation club by calling 
395-NICC, or on the Internet at 
www.lake-online.com/nicc. 




Patiently waiting 

Steven Bryson, 10, of Antloch waits for a catch Saturday during 
the Loon Lake Sportsman's Club 14th Annual Fishing Derby at the 
Loon Lake Resort. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 



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HEALTHWATCH 

Become pregnant with 
the help of a diet? / B8 



A BEAR 

God only knows 
what/B2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

Stylish anti-hero pays 
off in 'Payback' / B5 



Lakeland 
Newspapers 

Ftbnu*yl2, 
1998 



Section 




letter 
Homes and Gardens in search of 
county's oldest cookbook 



' ■ - ■ . - »■ „ ■.* • 

Chris Jackson of Woodland Realty Better Homes and Gardensjpolis through a cookbobtf from 1981. 
Th^cpmpany Is In search of the oldest Better Homes and Gardens cookbook in Lake County. 
— Photo by Sandy Bressner , 




By KENNETH pATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Better Homes and Gar- 
dens Cook Book on a Lake 
County kitchen cupboard 
.shelf may be worth a $100 
gift certificate. If it is old enough. 

Chris Jackson and Gale 
Schuemelfeder are on the hunt. 

Woodland Realty/Better Homes 
and Gardens in Lindenhurst is 
searching for the oldest copy of their 
namesake corporation's very fa- 
mous best selling cookbook. The : 
person who owns it will receive a 
$100 gift certificate for a meal at the 
Outback Steakhouse in Gurriee. 

The winner will be able to keep 
their old copy of the venerable cook- 
book. Afterall, this Is just a shame-. 
less ploy by the oldest real estate 
agency In Lindenhurst to have their 
name featured in the newspaper at 
no cost to themselves. 

According to Schuemelfeder, 
the contest Is a way to make the 
public aware that they have 
changed their name slightly. They 
are now part of the International 
Better Homes and Gardens Real Es- 
tate Service. 

"It's a celebration type of thing 
with a switch to the new franchise," 
Schuemelfeder said. 

So far, both the switch to Better 
Homes and Gardens Real Estate Ser- 
vice and the cookbook contest are 
working better than they expected. 

"Right now we have a photo- 
copy of one from 1939," 
Schuemelfeder said. "We just start- 
ed a couple of weeks ago." 

; Collecting cookbooks Is not as 
obscure an interest as people might ; 
suspect. Nancy Thielsen, of Ingle- 
side, and Karen Kuester, of Fox ' 
Lake, both have large cookbook col- 
lections. Kaye Kraus, of DUce Villa, 7 
has a collection of cookbooks which; 
she has been accumulating since 



she wasJ.S-years-old. \ 

Schuemelfeder said that the 
Better Homes and Gardens Cook- 
book is "probably the most popular 
cookbook." In 1981 it was described 
as the best-selling hard-cover cook- 
book ever sold. 

The first edition did not have a 
red plaid cover In 1930. The third 
edition in 1939 had the first hint of 
the now familiar plaid design. In 
1941, the plaid coyer design was - 
very evident and has been on the 
cover for edi- 
tions in 1951, 
1953,-1962, and 

1981. 

The search 
for ah old 
cookbook fits 
in nicely with 
the fact that 
Woodland Re-. 
airy also has 
been around 
for a long time. 
"We're the.old- 
est real estate 
agency in Lin- 
denhurst," said 
Broker-owner 
Chris Jackson. 
"We were es- 
tablished in 
1976." 

"My dad 
and 'uncle' 
built most of 
this town," she 
said. Most of 
their business was residential sales. 

"We also have a commercial di- 
vision." 

'•We are full-service," she said. 

Why affiliate with Better Homes 
and Gardens to sell homes? 

"To me; Better Homes and Gar- 
dens is like a breath of fresh air in 
- real estate," Jackson said. She likes 
the marketing plans and merchan- 
dising operations the corporation 



has to help people sell their homes. 

"We've been Better Homes and 
Gardens since July," she said. 

According to Jackson; the cor- 
porate affiliation is better known to 
the public In the eastern and west- 
em parts of the country. She expects 
rriorepeople.to become aware of it 
in the Chicago area. 

"They grew from seven offices 
in the Chicago area to 21 in less than 
a year," she said. 




Two Better Homes and Gardens cookbooks, one from 194, right, and 
the other from 1981, are gathered at the Woodland Realty office in 
Underihurst.— Photo by Sandy Bressner . 



And, one final plug: 

There are more than 1,400 of- 
fices and more than 23,500 licensed 
sales associates across the country. 
Jackson said that Woodland Realty^ 
has 21 of those licensed agents. ' 

People with old cookbooks can 
contact Woodland Realty at 356- 
1561, or stop by their office at 1819 
East Grand Avenue in lindenhurst. 
Jackson or Schuemelfeder can pro- 



vide additional details about the - : 
contest; People Will need to provide 
a photo-copyof the cover and the 
inside page showing the date of 
.'publication. 

Schuemelfeder said that they 
are looking only for the oldest Better 
Homes and Gardens Cookbook. 
However, the owner of Woodland 
Realty, Chris Jackson, said that she 
might be persuaded to expand the 
categories depending on the re- 
sponse the 
contest gen- 
erates. 

Cook- 
books have 
changed 
over the 
decades. 
For exam- 
ple, it has 
been a long 
time since 
anyone was 
told by a 
cookbook to 
add laid to a 
piecrust 
recipe. 

Cook- / 
books are a 
reflection of- 
social history 
arid the food 
styles of cul-. 
hires. The 
on-going 
popularity of 
cookbooks is a reflection of the 
changes that occur in eating pat- 
terns and for preferred foods. 
Ingredients change. New 
foods become available, such as 
quihoa and amaranth flours. 
Growersoffer new types of vegeta- 
bles and imported foods are on 
the shelves. Before World War II, 
soybeans were a non-existent 
food for the United States con- 



sumer. Todayit is an oil arid a 
tofu. . 

One of the biggest changes to 
cookbooks was the use of precise 
measurements.. Early recipes did not 
measure out Ingredients with mea- 
suring spoons and cups. Handfuls, 
pinches of that, tads of this, and 
guides about hpiy the final "resul t 
should look or feel were common. 

Kaye Kraus has a 1939 edition of 
the Better Homes and Gardens 
Cookbook. "It's very traditional," 
: she said. "It has the jams and jel- 
lies/ • 

"If you have a well-stocked 
kitchen, you can cook from that 
book without having to go out," she 
said. 

"The oldest (cookbooks). are my 
favorites. They do have the arts that 
ho one does any more." For exam- 
ple, old books had directions for 
.preserving food such as with can- 
ning methods. 

"People took time to dp things 
at home," she said. Baking desserts 
and making meals from scratch 
were common skills. 

"I mostly make things the old 
way. I do a lot of bread making. I 
prefer doing it the old way." 

Kraus started her collection * 
when she was 15 v "My mom was go- 
ing to school full-time. She became 
jn RN." As a legfctered nurse, her 
Mom was not arpundto prepare 
meals and Kraui helped out with the 
cleaning and cooking. Today she 
.^continues to create meals from in- 
gredients. 

> "This weekend I'm doing my 
, sister's wedding cake," shesaid. "I 
just did my second test run on a 
recipe, I think this one (will work," ' 

Kraus said that she keeps some 
of her recipes in a wood box; 
"They're the ones I have made-up," 

P/ease see COOKING IB2 



■' "'«WB 




B2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 12, 1999 



FROM PAGE Bl 



COOKING: Firm seeks Lake 
County's oldest cookbook 






she said. M I coll them 'keepers.'" 

If her family tikes something 
that she has made up, she writes It 
down so that she can keep it in her 
wooden redpa b oiH l "€ i < * i ' ■ •' . 

"I have a lot of church (coqk- * : 
books) . Those are some of my fa- » 
vorites," she said. "I have about20 r '* 
of those types." 

She finds then i in thrift stores 
and at garage sales. Some cook- 
books are given to her as gifts. 

For Kraus they are not only an 
educational resource, but also a link 
to a past way of life. "It's like getting 
hold of an era that's gone." 

Nancy Thielsen has been col- 
lecting cookbooks for many years. 

"I was in a book club," she said. 
"I collected them." To date she has 
about three or four dozen books. 

"The main one I use is a Mary . 
Meade Cookbook," Thielsen said. 
Meade was a food columnist for the 
Chicago Tribune. 

Thielsen said that she uses the 
books to cook different kinds of 
foods and desserts. 

"I have some that are Italian, 
some are history books," she said. 
The history of the origins of foods is 
explained In some books. 

"I like Chinese (food), so I've got 
a few of those. I've taken a Chinese 
cooking class, so they kind of fasci- 
nate me. 

Thielsen said that the books 
help her Ieam how to cook new 
foods. She also uses them to find a 
holiday specialty or a recipe that she 
does not make often. 

"I get a notion to cook some- 
thing different, I pick one out, and 



look for a recipe." 

"I have separate recipe cards 
from my mother-in-law," Thielsen 

\ r . | IT 'JThat'is'pMbably about the old- 
est that I raigln-have," she said. "I 
•^doitt navea Better Homes and Gar- 
den (cookbook)." 

Opps. 

Karen Kuester, on the other 
hand, does have a Better Homes 
and Garden Cookbook. It is a spe- 
cialty cookbook for desserts that 
was published in 1960 but does not 
have the familiar plaid cover. 

Her collection includes hard- 
bound cookbooks as well as pam- 
phlets by food manufacturers, and 
even a 1934 calendar page on one 
side with recipes on the other. One 
recipe in her collection had this an- 
notation in the upper right corner. 
"Sugar Saver- 1943, War Time." 

Kuester has 20 cookbooks pub- 
lished by church groups. "They're 
mostly pot-luck style recipes," she 
said. "You can make a salad for 15 
people in one bowl." 

"I love to cook. It relaxes me. I 
can be creative with it And, it's ap- 
preciated," she said. "There is 
something about cooking all day 
that makes my house smell good." 

Collector Kraus values her cook- 
books as a link to traditions and she 
uses them to cook for her family. 
For her they are a continuing edu- 
cational resource. 

"I would love to teach girls some 
of these o 1 d e r th i n gs , " she s aid . 
"Young girls don't know how to do 
them.". 




Waiting for God 
only knows what 



Welcome to the Abear 
FamilyTheaterl To- 
day's production is 
called "Waiting for 
God Only Knows What:" 

Stage I igh ts co me up on a bed- 
room, stage left. On the bed is a 
woman. Snoring, 

At the fo o t of the b ed is a do g 
and a cat. They are staring intently 
at the sleeping woman. They seem 
to be waiting for something. 

The spotlight switches to center 
stage. It is a family room, and a 
man sits, sipping on his first cup of 
coffee, watching a rerun of M AS.H. 
The clock says 5:30 a.m. A girl, ob- 
viously the man's child, sits beside 
him. 

GIRL "Hmmmpfl When is 
YOUR show going to be over? It's 
my turn." 

The man sighs, and looks 
hopefully toward the stairs. He, 
too, seems to be waiting for 
something. 

The spotlight switches back to 
the bedroom. The clock on the 
nightstand reads "6:30 am". The 
woman turns over on her side, and 
stops snoring. The dog and the cat 
are in the comer flipping a coin, 
The dog loses. 

The lights come back up on the 
family room. The clock now says 7 
a.m. A boy and'a girl now sit on the 
couch, watching cartoons. The 
man has moved to the kitchen, 
stage right. He is drinking his 5th 
cup of coffee. 

• BOY: "I'm hungry, Dad. Can I 
have some oatmeal with honey?" 



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LIFE'S 
ABEAR 

DonnaAbear 



GIRL: "Me, first! I want waffles. 
And cereal. And orange juice. With 
Ice. In the blue cup. No, make that 
the red cup. Wait - 1 don't want or- 
ange juice. I want milk. In the green 
cup. With ice." 

The man sighs and again looks 
toward the stairs. Again, he seems 
to be waiting for something. 

The spotlight moves back on 
the bedroom. The dog begins to 
crawl, paratrooper-style across 
the bed, until she reaches the 
woman. The dog begins licking 
the woman's arm, over and over. 
The woman yanks her arm away 
and hides it under the covers. She 
pulls a pillow over her head. The 
dog speaks to the cat. 

DOG: "Well, I give up. It's your 
turn." 

CAT: "That's why cats rule, bis- 
cuit brain. Watch this." 

The cat walks calmly to the foot 
of the bed, where the woman's foot 
and ankle is protruding. He bites 
her ankle. She flings her leg sudden- 
ly and the cat flies across the bed 
and falls off the other side. The dog 
snickers, and the cat gets up and 
acts like nothing happened. The 
woman mutters and looks over at 
the clock. It's 8 a.m. 

She groans, gets up and heads 
down the stairs, nearly tripping oyer 
the cat who is meowing loudly and 
doing figure eights around her an- 
kles. She mutters a mild obscenity. 

WOMAN: "D cat!" 

BOY CHILD: "MOM! Did you 
swear?" 

GIRL CHILD: "Mommy, he 
won't let me watch Blue's Clues! 
Hey, Mommy - you look better with 
your makeup on." 

WOMAN: "Can you two just be 
quiet until my other eye is open?" 

The woman glances around the 
family room with one eye. The cof- 
fee table is filled with half-eaten oat- 



meal In one bowl, cereal remnants 
and milk in another, and a plate 
with sticky stuff On it that appears to 
be syrup. She shakes her head and 
shuffles off to the kitchen. 

Lights come backup on the 
kitchen. There Is the man, and 
when he sees the woman he smiles. 
He tries to wave but his hand is 
shaking. Too much coffee. 

MAN: "Good morning, beauti- 
ful!" 

The woman stops and looks be- 
hind her. Then she picks up his cof- 
fee cup and smells it Just coffee. 
She shrugs and heads for the cabi- 
net that holds the pet food, stopping 
every few inches to fling the cat 
away from her ankles. 

WOMAN: "I wish you'd feed 
these animals once in a while so 
they wouldn't hover over me 
like vultures until I get up." . 

MAN: "I would, but they never 
come downstairs. They're wal ting 
for you." 

WOMAN: "God only knows 
whyl What am I, Doctor Dollttle? 
So, how long have YOU been up?" 

MAN: "Almost three hours." 

WOMAN: "Three hours? What 
have you been doing all this time?" 

MAN: "I fed the kids." 

WOMAN: "And...?" 

MAN: "And I've been waiting 
for you." 

WOMAN: "That's it? Waiting 
forme? Why? DO I LOOK LIKE 
GENERAL SWARTZKOPF? WHYIS 
EVERYONE WAITING FOR ME? 
WHY?!?" 

MAN: "Because we need you." 

Woman groans and looks up to - 
the heavens. 

WOMAN: "Just once, I'd like 
everyone NOT to need me!" 

The lights instantly go out. A 
few seconds later, a spotlight shines 
on the stage. The woman is alone. 
The man, the children, and the ani- 
mals are gone. She calls out to 
them, but there Is only silence. She 
looks up to the heavens. 

WOMAN: "HEY! I was only kid- 
ding!" 



Questions or comments for hu- 
morist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, Antioch, IL 60002. 



Tom Sawyer' to be presented at CLC 



The adventures of Mark Twain's 
classic character Tom Sawyer will be 
recreated in a musical production at 
the College of Lake County on Feb. 
27. Performances will be held at 
10:00 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. 



in the auditorium, Room C005, on 
the Grayslake Campus. 

, Tickets are $3 for CLC stu- 
dents, alumni and children under 
12 and $4 for the general public. 
Call 543-2300 for Uckets. 



Presents 

Sleuth 

By Anthony Shaffer 

Directed by Donna BadtJie 

February 12, 13, 19, 20 at 8:00 pm 

February 14, 21 at 2:30 pm 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

(847)395-3055 



Box office opened January 25. 
PM&L Theatre, P.O. Box 23, 877 Main St., Antioch 

m 



Box Office Hours: Moo. ttuu Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m.;Sal 11-2; 

1 1/2 his. belofo showtime. Reserved Sealing. VISA/MC 



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■— — MI—HUH UMlllll . 



> 



February 12, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 








SINGLES 



James and the Giant Peach runs Feb. 13 and 14 at Barat 
College's Drake Theatre In Lake Forest. 



James and the Giant Peach' 
at the Drake theatre 

Henry Trotter, a 
young boy who 
has been thrust 
into the. care of 
his wicked aunts 
after his parents' 
untimely death. 

M l > Children young 
and old will be 
captivated as 

James makes his 
escape to free- 
dom with the help 
of some over-sized fruit and a 
cast of Insect friends. 

James and the Giant Peach 
runs Saturday, Feb. 13 and 
Sunday, Feb. 14 at 1 p.m. and 
4 p.m. each day. Tickets are $4 
each. Group rates are available. 
All seats are reserved. 

To order tickets or for more 
Information, call the Drake 
Theatre Box Office at 604- 
6344. 



Dream Date Auction set 

The Midwest Chapter of the 
Starlight Children's Foundation will 
present Its 8th annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m., 
at the Park West, 322 W. Armitage In 
Chicago. 

The event will feature the auction 
of 26 bachelor and bachelorette date 
packages, food from over 30 of 
Chicago's favorite restaurants and a 
raffle and auction offering Internation- 
al, deluxe trip packages. Cost Is $30 in 
advance, $35 at the door. To order 
tickets or for more Information, call 
(312) 251-7827. 

Dance set for Friday 

The Solo Singles Club meets 
every Friday at 8 p.m. at the Gale 
Street Inn, 906 Diamond Lake Road 
In Mundeleln. The age range is 40 
plus and admission Is free. For 
more information call 746-6818, 




The Children's 
Theatre at Barat 
College proudly ' 
presents Richard 
R. George's 
dramatization of 
Roald Dahl's 
James and the 
Giant Peach, 
directed by Tom 
Patrick, and fea- 
turing Ben 
Seibert as James, 
Qadree. Holmes as the 
Narrator, and Sharon Muthu as 
the Centipede. Performances 
will be held in the Drake 
Theatre. 

Brought to you by the 
author of Charlie and the - 
Cnocofate Factory and The 
Great Glass Elevator, this chll- 
dren's favorite has' been enter- 
taining young and old for 
years. It's the story of James 




KID STUFF 



and winter sports. 

For more Information, call 546- 
8006, 

Cartooning classes 

The Anderson Arts Center of 
Kenosha will present a special series 
of cartooning classes beginning 
Saturday, Feb. 20, at 1 p.m." The 
weekly, 90 -minute classes, entitled 
"Toons," are designed for children 8 
to 14 years of age and will be taught 
by artist Mario Gonzales. 

Classes will be held at the 
Anderson Arts Center's Kid's Space, 
which Is located directly across the 
street from the Arts Center at 1 24- 
66th Street. 

Classes will run fro;m 1 p.m.. to 
2:30 p.m. Cost Is $12 per calss. For 
more information call 414-657-6005, 



public. 

For more Information or to 
become a "Friend of the Gallery" 
call 543-2405. 

Artstreet Art Fair 

A variety of fine art exhibits and 
crafts for all Interests will be avail- 
able for viewing and purchase on 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 27 arid 28 
in Festival Hall B at Navy Pier. Please 
call (608) 831-0707 for more Informa- 
tion. 



«■ 



MUSIC 



DANCE 



Culture kids 

Kids in grades 2-5 are invited to 
explore different cultures through 
stories, crafts and activities. 
Saturdays Feb.13. Register by calling 
the Children's Department of the 
Waukegan Public Library at 623- 
2041, ext 280. 

* 

YMCA programs 

"Kids Day Out Program" dates for 
this school year are as follows: Feb. 
12 (Lincoln's Birthday), March 1 
(Casimir Pulaski Day), and March 29, 
30, 31, April 1, 2 & 5 (Spring Break).; 

Each day of the program will take 
place from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Activities 
will Include archery, hiking, teams -. 
course, outdoor education, sports, • , 
fobzball, crafts, and boating. Winter 
weather will provide opportunities 
f o r Ice skating, sledding. Ice hockey. 



Dancing Under 
the Stars 

Amateur and professional 
dancers are invited to swing, boogie 
and twist the night away to the 
sounds of top Chicago orchestras in 
the Crystal Gardens at Navy Pier. 

Admission Is free. Dancing will 
be held every Wednesday through 
March 10. Free dance lessons are 
offered between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. 
and dancing will be held from 7- 
10:00 p.m. 



ART 



Art Members Exhibition 

The College of Lake County will 
be hosting the Community Gallery 
of Art Members Exhibition. This 
group show features Lake County 
artists who have Joined the "Friends 
of the Gallery." Works on display 
Include a wide variety of styles and 
media. 

The exhibition will tateplace J 
Ian. 15 through Feb. 21, 1999. 
This Is free and open to the 



Live music at 
Duke O'Brien's 

Duke O'Brien's hosts live music 
throughout the month of February. On 
Friday, Feb. 12 the rock band Middle 8 
will play. Saturday, Feb. 13 hosts the 
band Prime Time. Bring your sweetheart 
to Duke's for a Valentine's event on Feb. 
14 with a special menu and the band 
Stingwood from 6-9 p.m. On Friday, Feb. 
19 The Big Babies will be playing rock 
music for your enjoyment. A band known 
as Not the Beatles will perform on Sat., 
Feb. 20. The Fabulous Janes will be live 
on Friday,*Feb. 26 and the Cathy 
Richardson Trio appears on Saturday, 
Feb. 27. 

Duke O'Brien's is located at 110 N. 
Main St. in Crystal Lake. For more infor- 
mation on any of these events, please call 
815-356-9980. 

Gospel concert 

LaShun Pace, an award-winning 
, singer and one of the gospel music 
Industry's most sought-after record- 
ing artist, will perform at the Annual 
Salute to Gospel concert at the 
College of Lake County on Feb. 13. ~ 
. She will perform with the CLC Gospel 
Choir beginning at 8 p.m. in the 
Mainstage Theatre of the Performing 
Arts Building on the Grayslake 
Campus. 

Tickets to the concert are $10 for . . 
CLC Students, alumni and seniors 65 

Please turn to next page 



• 



MEWS 122 





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Chicago' & Waukegan 

The ONLY Cure for a Rib or 

BBQ Attack!. 

Waukegan Silk Screen- 

Waukegan 

Uniforms, Logos, Jerseys & 

Much More! 



50 EAST CONGRESS PARKWAY 



y ^yj 



««» jitciil.iiin < 



Aer Llngus «* 



State Bank of the Lakes 

Antioch, Grayslake and 

Llndenhurst 

The Art of Community Banking! 

Waukegan Savings and Loan 

The Tradition of Excellence for 

Over 75 Years! 

Ron & Brian's Suzuki-Waukegan 
Award Winning Sales & Servce 

for 

Motorcycles, Snowmobiles and 

ATVs! 

Grayslake PigglyWiggly 

For the Best Value. ..Shop the 

Pig! 

Wizard Computers-Round Lake 

. Beach 
?■ "When it Comes To Computers 
Trust The Wizard!" 

Lakes Area Music Center- 

Antioch' 

"Keeping the tradition of Music 

Alive!" 



Thanks to all our sponsors, 



i 



* 



x i 1 \ \ \ i * x I 






B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 12, 1999 



and over and $12 for the general pub- 
lic. Call 543-2300 for tickets. Advanced 
ticket purchase Is recommended. 

Chicago Sinfonietta 
solo debut 

Acclaimed violinist Rachel 
Barton, and Lyric Opera percussion- 
ist Ed Harrison will make their 
Chicago Sinfonietta solo debuts in 
March, as part of the Chicago 
Slnfonietta's fifth concert of their 
12th season. 

Music Director Paul Freeman will 
conduct. Two performances only: 
Sunday, March 7, 2:30 p.m. at 
Dominican University, 7900 W. 
Division St. in River Forest and 
Monday, March 15, 7:30 p.m. in 
Orchestra Hall at Symphony Center, 
220 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago. 

Tickets are now available by call- 
ing the Chicago Sinfonietta box office 
at (312) 857-1062. Ticket prices are 
$17-528 at Dominican University and 
$22-535 at Symphony Center. 

Symphony presents 
Cabaret Pops 

Saturday, Feb. 20, the Lake Forest 
Symphony will present its annual 
Cabaret Pops dinner evening featuring 
the symphony's own maestro David 
Itkin with vocalists Kristi Tingle and 
Steve Huffines. This evening of dining 
and entertainment will be held at the 
Deer Path Inn, 255 E. Illinois Road in 



Lake Forest. Tickets arc $55 per person. 
Call 295-2135 for furthepinfarmatlon 



Valentine's Day Party 

Sunday, Feb. 14 at Duke O'Brien's, 
1 10 N. Main St., Crystal Lake, will hold a 
Special Sweethearts Menu with music by 
acoustic trio StringWood, 6 to 9 p.m. For 
more information call (815) 356-9980. 

BLOODDRJVE 

Give blood at CLC 

The College of Lake County 
health center, in cooperation with the 
American Red Cross, will conduct a 
blood drive from noon to 7 p.m. on Feb, 
23 In the Brandel Court at the Grayslakc 
Campus. 

Donors must be 17 or older, weigh 
at least 110 pounds, be in good health 
and not have donated blood within 56 
days. Donors will receive a mini-physi- 
cal that includes a blood pressure check 
and iron level count. The blood drive 
will be conducted on a walk-in basis; 
priority appointments may be sched- 
uled by catling the CLC health center at 
543-2064. 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Equine photography 

Join well-known equine photogra- 
pher Gemma Gcmanlnc for an Informa- 



tive and fun photography workshop 
Tuesday, Feb. 16 from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. at 
the Hoovcd Animal Humane Society. 
The session will be held at the Humane 
Society's indoor educational center 
located at 10804 McConncll Road, 
Woodstock. 

The workshop is open to the 
public and costs only $10. 
Registration Is limited so call and 
reserve your space today (815)337- 
5563. The Hooved Animal Humane 
Society is a non-profit organization 
dedicated to the protection of horses 
and other hooved animals. 

BDUCATIONj 

Divorce survival 

The Family Service Community 
Education Program Is offering an 
educational course colled Divorce 
Survival. This is a four week course 
which focuses on the personal, finan- 
cial, and legal concerns of divorcing 
partners. 

This program will help you 
through the maze of divorce. 
Financial and legal experts will share 
knowledge and insights to help you 
make good decision before you sign 
those papers. 

It will be held every Thursday at 
7 -9 p.m. Feb. 25 through Mar. 18. 
The cost is $40. 

For more information call Kris 
Andersen at 662-4464. 




'Cabin Fever Jazz' Concerts continue at Gorton 



The Marshall Vente Quartet 
with Vocalist Colleen Timler will 
perform on Feb. 28 from 4-6 p.m. at 
part of the "Cabin Fever Jazz" con- 
certs at Gorton Community Center, 
400 East Illinois Rd. in Lake Forest. 
Tickets are $15 each. 

Marshall Vente has a long- 
standing love of jazz music, and 
hosts a show on public radio sta- 
tion WDCB called "Jazz 



Tropicale." Howard Reich, critic 
with the Chicago Tribune, 
describes him as an "irrepressible 
pianist, bandleader, composer, 
and emergent impresario." 
Marshall and WDCB produced 
his fourth annual jazz festival, a 
three-day event at Joe Segal's Jazz 
Showcase, which consistently 
receives rave reviews. The 
Quartet plays a wide range of 



music, including standards, jazz 
classics, originals, Latin, 
Brazilian, and novelty tunes. 
Joining Marshall are vocalist 
Colleen Timler. 

For further information, or 
to receive a program brochure, 
contact or stop by the Gorton 
office at 847-234-6060 between 
9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on week- 
days. 



Physicist to speak 
on holography 

Tung H. Jeong, professor emeritus of physics at Lake Forest 
College, will speak on holography and its use in the fields of 7 
medicine, engineering and other technical areas on Feb. 24 at 
the College of Lake County. 

Jeong will make a presentation to students at 2:30 p.m. and 
another to the general public at 7:30 p.m. Both presentations 
will be held in the auditorium, Room COOS. Professor Jeong will 
also demonstrate how to make a hologram. The program is 
sponsored by CLC's engineering club. Tickets are $2 for CLC 
students and $3 general admission. 

Call 543-23200 for tickets. 

Innovative child care 
program to be held at Gorton 

"Child Care at Home," an innovative program for anyone 
considering home daycare, will be held at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake Forest. The program will be 
led by Julie Kalin, a Lake Bluff resident, early childhood educa- 
tor, owner of Stay, Play & Learn; and will take place on Tuesday, 
Feb. 23 from 7-9 p.m. or Saturday, Feb. 27 from 9-11 a.m. The 
fee is $40. 

Interested participants should register and pay in advance. 
For further information, or to receive a program brochure, con- 
tact or stop by the Gorton office at 847-234-6060 between 9 a.m. 
and 4:30 p.m, weekdays. 



Grafters wanted 
for spring festival 

Grafters needed for the Spring Craft Festival, March 13, at 10 
a.m. — 4 p.m. at Grayslake High School, 400 N. Lake Street, 
Grayslake. This event is sponsored by the Grayslake High School 
Band Boosters; 

For more information please call Carol 548-1 139. 




Romancing the archives at the Lake County Museum 



Discover romance at the lake 
County Museum's Curt Teich 
Postcard Archives and Lake County 
History Archives in Wauconda, on 
Saturday, Feb. 13, from 1 to 4 p.m. 

Go behind the scenes of the 
world-renowned Curt Teich Postcard 
Archives, and the Lake County 
History Archives to learn more about 
the romantic love stories they hold. 
Diaries, letters, postcards and more 
reveal the joy and anguish of love lost 
and love found. In celebration of 
Valentine's Day, romantic archival 
materials from the collections will be 
higlilighted including an 1833 jour- 
nal entry about young Colbee 
Benton and his dreams of encoun- 



ters with Native Americans during 
Ills travels through pre-settlement 
Lake County; the story of Waukegan 
native Homer Dahringer, a WWI aer- 
ial observer who was killed behind 
enemy lines in Germany in 1918, and 
of his fiancee, who wore his ring and 
stayed true to him until hermarriage 
at the age of 85; a Civil War-era crush 
between two young Millbum resi- 
dents, recorded in the young lady's 
diary, and many more vintage sto- 
ries. 

Tours of the archival collections 
begin at 1 and 3 p.m. Cost is $3.50 
per person. Adults and families with 
children 1 1 years or older are invit- 
ed. Reservations and pre-payment 



are required. 

' For additional information on 
Romancing the Archives, call 526- 
8638. The Lake County Museum is 
the future site of new exhibitions' 
opening late fall, 1999. 

If you are interested in learning 
more about the Lake County 
Museum's new exhibitions or to 
make a donation to the Museum, 
call Janet GalUmore, museum direc- 
tor or Mary Ellen Mason, communi- 
cations and development coordina- 
tor at 526-7878. 

The Lake County Museum is 
located in Lakewood Forest 
Preserve on Route 176, just west of 
Fairfield Road near Wauconda. 



.... ] 

n 

■ , 

■ 
f 




New Consoles * Studio Pianos 
Digital Pianos and Digital 
Ensembles used ONE WEEK 
at "Street Scenes" Carmel 
High School Fund Raiser 



CARMEL HIGH SCHOOL 

Sunday, Feb. 14th 
12 to 3 pm 

For Further Information Call 

(847) 949-0977 

Delivery - Service - Financing by Conn Music Centers 




Open 
Golf Tournament 

Saturday, February 27, 1999 
Brae Loch Golf Course, Grayslake 

•Challenge Old Man Winter To Nine Holes 
•Enjoy An All-You-Can-Eat Chili Lunch 
•Take Home Door Prizes & Awards 

Only $25 per person. 
Pre-paid registration required. 



Call (847) 223-5542 
to reserve your foursome. 



Special Prizes for Best Dressed Dapper & Daffy Duffers 



^$£& LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES 



Preservation, Restoration, Education and Recreation 



,w~ *N— • ».,.-- 






February 12, 1999 



•ORYO 






Lakeland Newspapers f 85 





k orter. He is the main chaf- 
f acter of the stylish crime 
film "Payback," but he Is 
not a hero of traditional 
proportions. 

For starters, he is a bad guy. He 
is a thief. He plans and executes 
high-stakes robberies. 

The film pulls no punches by 
establishing Porter's despicably low 
ways of getting around paying for 
things himself. 

His driving force in the film is 
$70,000 which was taken from 
him— and he wants it back. The 
money isn't even honest money, it 
is Porter's share of a well devised 
heist. 

Porter wants his share of the 
stolen money back and he wants 
retribution for the double-cross. 

Only Mel Gibson, who portrays 
Porter, could turn such character 
flaws into a character you like. 

It is a great, change-of-pace. 
role for Gibson because he plays 
Porter as someone who wants re- 
venge, will go through any lengths 
to get it, but is not stupid about 
getting It. 

A lot of the credit for "Payback," 
based on the novel "The Hunter" by 
Richard Stark, should also go to the 
script-writers, Brian Helgeland and 
Terry Hayes, who devised such a 
smooth, intensely brutal script 

And brutal It is. Helgeland and 
Hayes give Porter a brutal, don't- 
get-in-my-way confidence that in- ; 
stills fear in others and accompa- 
nies that with the lack of morals he 
needs if he is going to survive 



stylish and- 

■ 



movie review 




Payback 

Rated R 

Director 

Brian Helgeland 

Starring 

Mel Gibson 

.Gregg Henry 

Maria Bello 

David Paymer 

William De vane 

Kris Kristofferson 



against the organized crime group 
from which he intends to get the 
$70,000 back. 

As a result he is treated with 
the same brutality when dealt 
with by the various low-lives 
whose toes he steps on In his 
quest for the money. 



And there are plenty of people 
who want Porter's blood, the mon- 
ey, or both. And they are all mean. 
Even the cops he deals with are cor- 
rupt. 

Helgeland, who also directed 
"Payback," creates this dark, cor- 
rupt setting by shooting the entire 
film in a dark, grainy, blue-filtered 
view. 

The film moves with swift pur- 
pose and there is rarely a dull-mo- 
ment. 

Helgeland is still listed as direc- 
tor of "Payback," even though he re- 
portedly abandoned the film prior 
to finishing it. 

The studio reportedly wanted to 
make Porter more likable. Helge- 
land didn't, so he quit. 

In the end it did not hurt the 
film, because, no matter who fin- 
ished the film it was Well done. 

Porter does become likable, but 
not to the point where it is out of 
character. 

It is more of a curiosity on the 
part of the viewer to see if he can 
stand up to the organized crime 
syndicate and stay alive doing it. 

The in-your-face brutality of the 
film is also handled quite well. Al- 
though much of the violence is on 
screen some of the violence is Im- 
plied, but done so well as to have 
just as much impact. 

"Payback" is violently clever, 
stunningly blatant, intensely enter- 
taining and yet stays true to Its 
characters throughout the film. 

For that, I give "Payback" four 
out of five popcorn boxes. 



'Midsummer Night's Dream' has nightmarish undertones 



Some 400 years after William • 
Shakespeare wrote "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream," his comic fantasy, 
flush with fairies, mischief and mer- 
rymaking, continues to inspire the 
creative bent of modern-day direc- 
tors. 

As presented at Chicago's court 
Theatre, the play, while true to the 
bard's original language, accentu- 
ates the tale in a more offbeat man- 
ner. At times, under the direction of 




Usa Dqdson plays Titan la and 
Hippolyta in "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" at Chicago's 
Court Theatre. 



Laszo Marton, the play is downright of Lysander {Luke WUkins) and 



dark. 

Puck is a malev olent, an- 
drogynous creature, while the 
contingent of fairies attending 
fairy queen Titania (Lisa Dodson) 
wear outfits more befitting of the 
Spice Girls. 

The magical affection-inducing 
compound that's added to the eyes 



Demetrius (Frank Zotter) is admin- 
istered via the red dot of a laser 
pointer. Stacks of black and neon 
green pillows serve as the "forest" 
where most of the action occurs. 
Matt DeCaro, a one-man tour- 



de-force as the actor Bottom. Is a 
barrel-bodied man who Daunts his * 
girth when he's transformed into an 
ass arid finds himself fawned over 
by Titania?', 

: r Carey Peters as Hernila, the 
suddenly-spumed lover, and Wendi. 
Weber, her long-time friend, both 
need to grow into their parts. 
Michael Chaban, appearing as 
Oberan, has a different problem: He 
must concentrate more on making 
his words understood. 

This "Midsummer Night's 
Dream" is full of intriguing possibil- 
ities, but it's definitely no dream. It 
runs through Feb. 21. Ticket infor- 
mation is available at 773/753- 
4472.— By Tom Witom 



MOVIES AND TIMES START FEBRUARY 12, 1999 



SHOWPLACE8 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of<ES) 
3 847/247-8958 & 



ALL SEATS s 2?° FRI & SAT 

s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



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*Sar.-Sun. Matinees in (Brackets] 

RUGRATS(G) 

[*l:45 *4:00] 6:45 9:00 DIGITAL 

LIVING OUT LOUD (R) 

[* 1 :40 *4:IS] 7:40 10:20 DIGITAL 

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (PG) 

■pi:!0 *3:45] 7:10 9:30 DIGITAL 

ENEMY Oi THE STATE (R) 

[*I145 *3:30] 6:50 9:40 DIGITAL 
[*l:20 *4:I0] 7:30 10:10 DIGITAL 

WATERBOY (PG-13) ■■ 

[*UI5 *3:40] 7:15 9:45 DIGITAL 
[*100 *4:20] 8:00 10:15 DlGrfAL 

JACK FROST (PG) 

[* 1:00*3:50] 7:00 9:15 DIGITAL 
vUlt our mbtto tt www.toftxrtw.com 



'A 00 (1 1 A UfttJtR) ADUUS VM AFTCJ1 6PM 




MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE ("»>. 

Daily 12:15,1:15, 2:55,3:55,. 
5:35,6:35,8:15,9:15 

RUSHM0RE (»> 

Daly 12*0, 2*5, 450, 655, 9«> 

3 BLAST FROM THE PAST («•»> 
Daly 1150, 2:15, 4*0, 7:05, 930 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN (*> 
Daly 12*0, 2:10, 420, 650, &40 

PAYBACK ro 

Daly 12:10, 250, 450, 7:10, 950 

HILARY & JACKIE w 

Daily 6:15, 8:45 

OCTOBER SKY TO 

Sun. 6:45 

SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE (") 

Daily 1:00,3:35,6:15, 8:50 
SHE'S ALL THAT (fg 13) 
Daly 1206, 220, 455, 650, 905 

A SIMPLE PLAN jn t cn 

Daily 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:50 

A CIVIL ACTION (»-«) 
Daly 11*5, 2:10, 455, 7:00, 950 

PATCH ADAMS (»■«) 
Mon. - Sat. 11:45, 2:05, 4:25; 

6:45, 9:05 Sun. 11:45,2:05, 
4:25,9:00 



Wcfir«TH 5 IMrJl<£KH ♦ /jm 



378 Lake St. Antioch 



CAAA SQJIOfiS (OVER Kl CHILDREN 
V W WNOEfl t1| I ML SHOWS BEFORE 6PU 
■■ ; koQADUtlStfTERJPH 

PAYBACK (R) 

Fit 6:45, 9:00; Sat 2:15, 450, 

6:45, 9:00; Sun. 2:15, 4:30, 7.-00; 

Mon. -, Thurs. 7:00 



, LIBERTY (847)362-3011 

. 708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 



SnOO SWOBS (OYER W CHILDREN 
*/ UU (UN0EHI1L»*U.W«» BEFORE (PM 
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SHE'S Ail THAT (PG-13) 

Fri. 6:45, 0:00; SaL 2:15, 4:30, 

6:45, 9:00; Sun. 2:15, 4:30, 7:15 

Mon. - Thurs, 7:15 

A BUG'S LIFE (G) 

Sat & Sun. 2:00, 4:00 

STEPMOM (PG-13) 
Fri. & Sat 6:15, 8:45 

Sun. - Thurs. 7:00 



1204 N. Green St. 




Mel Gibson plays Porter In "Payback," a stylish, violent movie in 
which Gibson plays the hero who Is also the bad guy. 




r/« m m TW0 DAY 

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SEE AU. THREE RMS WFTH THE FEST TKKET FOR JUST SI 

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MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE (PG-13) (1154:10] 7:10930 NO 

• BLAST FROM THE PAST (PG-13) 
(1250 130 4:00 4:45) 7:00 7:40 9:40 10:10 

I* MY FAVORITE UAHTIAN (PG) (12S0 3:10 S2S) 7:45 155 Ota 
SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE(R)(1:10 4:05)6:55 9:45 WO 

* PAYBACKS (1:10 135 410 435) 7.15 730 955 10:15 wa 
SHE'S ALL THAT (PG-13) 

(12:40 1-203:104:20 5:30) 7:107:509:30 10:10 wa 
I * SAVING PRIVATE RYAN (B) (1 :00 4:30) 6:00 on 
UstMPUY IRRESISTIBLE (PG-13) (1.30)725wa' 
IVARSOY BLUES (R> v V (1:45 4:4S) 720 1015wol 

lATnwneiQKHPa-isv 1425) KUSna! 

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\MOKTY JOEYOUMQ CPOV HvtO 4:40)TJ05ft3S 
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|A BUG'S LIFE (G) (12:45 3:00 5.05) T.20 £20 
YOLTVE GOT MAIL (PQ) 7:X1l>00D«o| 

C1VJL ACTION (PO-1 3) 025 4.00) &50 9:15 aol 
4E RIXJRATS MOVIE (G) fl.1353:05 5:K))I 

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IiMM'* Lf.ilnl I ,»p fritl.iv *"tit«UJ*V <? Only 1 '»■ 



/rs\ General Cinema 

«i? LAKEHURST 



ROUTE 43 nsar ROUTE 120 
(847) 444-FILM »«to 



[CLASSIC 



•AIOAIH MAHNIU IYUT OAT 
All SMOWf ■ VOtI « PM 



SHOWTIMES FOR 2/5 THRU 2/11 



I BARGAIN MATINEES AIL SHOWS BEFORE &PH 
'INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 




SEM0RS (OVEH 00) A CWJDWN 

(11AUN0GR)AWLTS1 



1 ni*um^AW^»^AFTra6P 

RUGRATS m ; 
Sat. & Sun. 2:15,4:15 

AT RRST SIGHT (P«<i3) 

Fri. & Sat 6:15, 8:45 
Sun. - Thurs. 7:15 

A BUG'S LIFE w 

Sat & Sun. 2:30, 4:30 



(P8-11) 
Fri. & Sat 6:30, 0:00 
Sun. - Thurs. 7:00 



X 



M ii mm 



: 

1 



Ble. 132& Rollins Rd. Foi lolce 
nn t»cHP»-.Two| In all auditorium* * DIGITAL 



SHOWTIHES— FRIDAY, FEB. 12 
THRU THURSDAY, FEB. 18 

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE* ^ 

Fri/Sat 12:50 3:30 6:45 9:30 

Sun/Wed 1250 3:30 6:45 

Mon/Tue/Thur 6:45 

MY FAVORITE MARTIAN* (PC, 

Fri/Sat 12:00 2:10 4:20 7:00 9:25 

. Sun/Wed 1 2:00 2: 10 4:20 7:00 

Mon/Tue/Thur 7:00 

SHE'S ALL THAT [PC .33 

Fri/Sat 12:35 250 5:35 7:55 10:10 

Sun 12:35 2:50 7:55 

Wed 12:35 2:50 5:35 7:55 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:35 755 

BLAST FROM THE PAST ipcu) 

Fri/Sat 12:20 255 5:15 7:45 10:15 

Sun/Wed 12:20 2:55 

5:15 7:45 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:15 7:45 

PAYBACK* m 

Fri/Sat 12:40 3:00 5:30 8:00 10:20 

Sun/Wed 12:40 3:00 5:30 8:00 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:30 8:00 

OCTOBER SKY [pgj 

Sneak Preview- Sunday 5:35 

• No pn»«i or couponi 

FREE REFILLS 

POPCORN a SOFT: DRINKS 

No thfldnw wds 6 admitted la »-fa*td mevto olisf t PM 



WHtRE M0UI£ GOING IS F0N AND M F0R0A8LE 



BLAST FROM THE PAST po-i* 

Fri. 43a 7:00.930 SaL- Sun 2:00, 430, 7:00, 930 
TuB.»TlTut 430. 7M __^_ 



MESSAGE W A BOTTLE P(n 31 

FfL 42ft 7.i». W5 SaL- Sin. 1:45. 420, 7m 9:45 
Tue.-Thi42b,7.-00 - 



STEPMOM (po-13) 
|Frl-Moa73ft1lhOOTue.-Tru730 



^rTYFAVORITE MARTIAN (P<D 
Frt. 530, 7:45, 1000 SaL- Men. 1:00, 115, 530, 
7:45J0l00Tue.-Tr«f. 53ft 7:45 



[ASIMPLE PLAN m 

Fri. 430, 7:10. J55 SaL- Moa 155, 430, 7:10,9.55 
TuU-Thut 430. 7:1 



SHE'S ALL THAT (po-13) 
Fit 520, 730, 9.40, 11:40 SaLim StlCL 52GV 730, 
9:40, 1V:40Sun.- Men. W t 3:10, 52O,73ft>.40 
Tub>1tu:520 1 730.-i ■■ 



I PRINCE OF EGYPT ipoi 
Fri. 520 SaL - Mca 1m lia 520 TtBL-Tbu; 520 



VARSITY BLUES W 

lFrL 439, 7J0O.931 11:45 S± MO, 43a 7^0.930, 11:45 
Sui+lcailft4^7m933Tut-Tlit4aBi™ . 



PATCH ADAMS (P<n3l 

Fri. 4:45, 7:15 SaL-Mon. £15. 4:45, 7:15 
Ti8,-Thuc4:45 



, «PiYnHESSTBLEf^i3| 

lFrL530Sat-Tue.1:1Q,320,530Tue.-ThUT.530^ 



I SAVING PRIVATE RYAN TO 

FfL430,&00SaL-Moa 1^,430, 8:00 
Tue.-1rut 430, 7:40 



PAYBACK TO 

FiL'430.530.659. 7:45. 9.00,10:00, 1:15 SaLW 
2:15i Sis, 434530, 6i0,7:45, 9.0ft 1(100.11:15 
Sua-Moa WO, 2:15, 3:15, 430, 53ft &5ft7;45, 9( 
lOrtMTua-Thr. 43ft 530, 63ft 7:45 



';45,a0ft 



AMERICAN HISTORY X w 

Ffi-Mon. 7:4ft 10:OOTua.-Thui7:40 



AT FIRST SIGHT ipo-i3> 

Ffi-Mon. 9.45 Tue.-M 7:15 •«■■ 



I ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW n 

SaL'11^0 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 



>>..*!••••*.— 



B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 12, 1999 



February 12, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 

■ 



Lakeland Newspapers I B7 







ADVERTtSEMINT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Grande Jake's 



Location: 

Linden Plaza in Linclenhurst 

Telephone: 

(847)265-1411 

Hours: 

Monday Ihrough Thursday from -1 0:30 
a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday- 
from 1 0:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and from 1 1 
a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Sunday. 

Menu: 

Authentic Mexican and Tex Mex food: 



featuring chicken, steak, or beef burritos, 

plus ar 
A'full line of Mexican and American 



lg'„. 

fajilas plus an extensive Mexican menu. 
A full lineofMexica 
beers and cocktails. 




ake's bri 




ican to town 



If you can't head for the Latin glory over the Grande Jake's mouth-watering beef, chicken or 

border, a visit to Grande Jake's is the next best thing steak burritos and fajitas, or another of the 

as you dine in the authentic atmosphere enhanced, many other ; menu favorites. Dinners are served 

by a festive hand-painted Mexican mural. with rice, beans and salad. The fajitas come 

A friendly and courteous staff serves cus- with Jake's special Pico de Gallo. 
Owner Jacob Rodriguez brings to Lake County- tomers for both lunch and dinner seatings. If you prefer to take your favorite Mexican 

the expertise of his family's two other El Tipico Enjoy the complimentary chips and salsa as dish home, order by calling {847)265-141 1 or 

Mexican Restaurants, located at 1836 W. Foster in you relax with a refreshing Margarita, Pina faxing (847) 265-5226. Grande Jake's accepts 

Chicago, and at 3341 Dempster in Skokie. Colada or a glass of Sangria before dining on all major credit cards. 



The Mexican restaurant in Linden Plaza, 
Lindenhurst, is under new ownership. Grande 
Jake's Authentic Mexican Grill has a new look, 
the best service, and an extended menu featur- 
ing the finest Mexican food. 




LisiyourfpjriteHOTfOi 
Iwthlp 




m\ 



,'■;■->: 



if. ...v-*" *^ -\ • 






JOIN US! 



GAME ROOM OPEN 



US FRIDAY 






■■■ • , . . 



SURifn 




JDAY. FEB. 14 • VALENTINE'S DAY 

. n£ .■ "* PER 




? 



IRBMP. CASINO BUS TRIP • SATURDAY, 

WED. a, FBI. - KABAOH 




- ■ ■ . 



■ •■ 

■ i 



at ri » » »*Ai. h fc* V^ ' 



*.ltm^,J~..m**M 



# 



Food & Drink 






^fiif-^f-j y _»fj^^y^p^^Mnr-r ■ ■•'•, '■' ' * 




mam open na. & sat. •ju.midnibht 

05i®ia a '=KFi3a a 

18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd., Gages Lake 

(847> 223-2575 



Walleye Fish Fry ; $ 8 96 
AU-U-Can-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz.: $9.95 Entree 10 bz.: $11.97 
A la Cartel4 oz.: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 




TheBest Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are Tlie Critics 



Happy 

Valentine's 

Day! 



Chinese Restaurant 



Plenty of Free Parking 

•Dine In ♦ Carry Out 'Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 
lllS.Hwy.45 Gray slake 

(847)548-8882 Fax: (847)548-2822 

FREE DELIVERY -CALL FOR DETAILS 



NEED A CHANGE OF PACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



^CtllLU* c -£j, d caM vV Ti^hl Depot 

iSo^w' n M-«n Street , McMenry, .L 

Drink Specials All Week 

Lunch &r Dinner Specials Mon.rPri. 



■■ w 

V 

JUST LIKE H 



k;=5 



VFreshest of ingredients 






'A 



w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 margadtas per table) 

Frplr** 2/28/99 




: 

BARS. 
GRILL 



MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS 

SATURDAY, FEB. 13 



MONDAY 

$1.0O Domestic Boors 

TUESDAY 

Taco Night • $3.0O All-U-Can-Eat 

WEDNESDAY 

Mini Burgors 
$1.25 oa. or 6 pack for $5.95 

THURSDAY 
SOc Drafts 

FRIDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Fish Fry $5.95 • Crab Logs $16.95 

SATURDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Prima Rib $12.95 

SUNDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Breakfast Buffet $3.99 

Scup S. Oppetiwu. Ettexy Might 

Open Mon-Thurs. Mom-Midnight; 
fri&Sot. )1an+3om; Sunday 8on>Ktidnight ■■ 

26375 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL\ 

847-395-1707 

21/2 Miles West of Rt. 59 




•Madje just for you .^eiiortlerail 

a 



Sit atfctTClax in pur 
j^hipsand^ 





Fine Foods -Cocktails 
2816 Rt. 120 • McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 





Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner S 11 9S 



Home of McHenry's 




Dinner Special every Sunday night 
^iaccon^aqied; A^iti^'^usicvby: 

Jim 




•ALL DINNERS JUST $ 6 95 l 

!: Chinpchanga,. Enchiladas, Fajia Platter & Taco Platter.; 

-AU dinners include letai^tomatoes, ricej'beansi ^acam ( 

sour cream plus a COMPUMENTARY MARGARITA i 

1 Please mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. ' 

^v3R"™ ~ ~ — " *~ ~jffi-" ~ "5r T".™ T? ™ " 7,~JZ>hai 




Free Chips & Salsa 
with every order 



WZ6 




0:W 




Dining on the Lake 



,; '. ^Vvl'"'~' 





A Repulaltoo tor Fine Food^Sptriu ; iKid Hoqplialliy on 1 

■DIA WIOND LAKE^ MUNDELEIN 

A Casm); doxmiy fmosphem Specializing in r .' " 






ICUNCHAND w.^.^. Kn 

PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

Show Lounge Dancing Featuring 

HBETER GUERJN 

Elvis impersonator 
Friday and Saturday 



Advertise your business 






in Hot Snots 

Call 847-223-8161 



At DiNO'S DEN 





* f fr ■ * » 



10:30am - 2:00pm 

Caivirt^St^bii with Peel arid Eat Shrimp 

Abo including... Sausage Links and Chicken Selection 

Carved Breast of Turkey Hickory Smoked Bacon 

Lox Platter with .. ^>W*%0$^ 

Cream Cheese Cheese Bhntzes with 

. Cheeseana'^gels; ^ Assorted FruitToppings. _ 
Eggstokediodrder - 



S14A5 for Adults •SitM Senior Citizens Over 55 ' 
$*M for Children 12 yean of age and under ' 



for Children Under 5 Years of Age 
Of Equal or Umser Value 




Must present coupon 

Pasta of the Day y-- ^ .,^.j.. immnk 
Fish of the Day "** I** ^W 81 ? """^ 
a Thick French Toast cipftfelitt fife SSIXthg 

"Pancakes ^IjIMfS&kffM 

MUNDELEIN 



Belgian Waffles 




w*v 



eg t7— Tf mptoiiwi"ii 5 )°:$ : RoUte ' 83 * ^rea^^§^mi"£ e ^l 8 i!l£^---_ J 




'18.95 
5 11. 95 
^8.95 

........ v A**#7*J 

*9.95 



* * * • 



• »(••« Oil 



ftra«i>A«>*< 



10 Oz. Lobster 
Jail ■. . . . 

Prime: Rib 

Chicken Dijon . 

T-Bone . 

Orange Roughy 

Shrimp Dijon *1'2.95 

6-8 Oz. Filet Mignon & ■ 

& 10 Oz. Lobster Tail 5 28.95 

T 2 (3 Ozlf . Lobster Tails & . 

. N,Y..-- Strip . . s 22.95 

London Broil ..... 3 7.95 

(847) 587-6604 

Fox Lake 





*i 



, .*., -. - ,, • ..,.. *i*m •W 



r ,.-.i .»- -*. 






B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



February 12, 1999 



February 12, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 




Lakeland Newspapers / B7 




ADVERTISEMtNT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

Linden Plaza in Lindenhurst 

Telephone: 

(847)265-1411 

Hours: 

Monday Ihrough Thursday from -10:30 
a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 
from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and from 11 
a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Sunday. 

Menu: 

Authentic Mexican and Tex Mex food: 



Grande Jake's 



featuring chicken, steak, or beef burritos, 

pTusan 
A full line of Mexican and American 



gi 
fajilas plus an extensive Mexican menu. 
A full line of Mexica 
beers and cocktails. 





n to town 



The Mexican restaurant in Linden Plaza, 
Lindenhurst, is under new ownership. Grande 
Jake's Authentic Mexican Grill has a new look, 
the best service, and an extended menu featur- 
ing the finest Mexican food. 



If you can't head for the Latin glory over the Grande Jake's mouth-watering beef, chicken or 

border, a visit to Grande Jake's is the next best thing steak burritos and fajitas, or another of the 

as you dine in the authentic atmosphere enhanced, many other menu favorites. Dinners are served 

by a festive hand-painted Mexican mural. with rice, beans and salad. The fajitas come 

A friendly and courteous staff serves cus- with Jake's special Pico de Gallo. 
Owner Jacob Rodriguez brings to Lake County- tomers for both lunch and dinner seatings. If you prefer to take your favorite Mexican 

the expertise of his family's two other ElTtpico Enjoy the complimentary chips and saisa as dish-home, order by calling (847)265-1411 or 

Mexican Restaurants, located at 1836 W, Foster in .you relax with' a refreshing Margarita, Pina faxing (847) 265-5226. Grande Jake's accepts 

Chicago, and at 3341 Dempster in Skokie. Colada or a glass of Sangria before dining on all major credit cards. 



Mail to: Lakeland NewspMM 



fiO; Box 268 • Qrayslake, IL 60030 

■■"...■ 




; 



|f n,1..q.^ A 



join un 



GAME ROOM OPEN 



day; feb^ m a • 



■ 



SUNDAY, FEB. 14 • VALENTINES DAY 
SURF W TURF-CHAMPAGNE TOAST • $25 PER 

WED. & FBI. - KARAOKE 




-Wfri^v*.^ 



-tt *■*-■»■*,- --!■»** 



Jesse ^faks 

Food & Drink 



KITCHEN OPEN FBI. & SAT. TIL MIDNIGHT 

B/aQQ^ Q.QDQ9©!) §PE©Q&[LS 
18490 W. Old Cages Lake Rd.,.Cages Lake 

(847) 223-2575 



JOIN US FRIDAY 

Walleye Fish Fry •*&*■ 
AU-U-Can-Eat Cod • $6.93 

JOIN US SATURDAY 

Prime Rib 

A la Carte 10 oz.: $9.95 Entree 10 bz.: $11.97 
A la Carte 14 oz.: $11.97 Entree 14 oz.: $13.94 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 
9 am Saturday & Sunday 




Chinese Restaurant 



Tfte Best Chinese Food 

In The Area,.. 

And Our Customers 

Are Tfie Critics 



Happy 

Valentine's 
Day! 



Plenty of Free Parking 



NEED A CHANGE OF FACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Gtayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 

. FREE DELIVERY -CALL FOR DETAILS 




MONDAY 

$1.0O Domestic Boors 

TUESDAY 

Toco Night • $3. OO All-U-Con-Eat 

WEDNESDAY 

Mini Burgors 
$1.25 oo. or 6 pack for $5.95 

THURSDAY 

50C Drafts 

FRIDAY 

AIMJ-Can-Eat 
Fish Fry $5.95 • Crab Legs $16.95 




MAIN STREET 




Can Una y 




eszauran te 



Located In * nc 



Old C&rrivy Train Depot 



* ^^ 






4005.W. Main Street • McHenry, \ L 

i u o 385-414 0- 

• DcHclauS Appetizers; .',£, 

• Dri'nh Specials All Week 

• Lunch'6* Dinner Specials Mori.rFri 



,vi "n 



FREE MARGARITA 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 margaritas per table) 

F vr l™ 2/28/99 




MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS 

SATURDAY, FEB. 13 



SATURDAY 

All-U-Can-Eat 
Prlmo Rib $12.95 

SUNDAY 

All-U-Con Eot 
Breakfast Buffet $3.99 

Soup, <£ dppetiwt* Enextf JVigfU 

Open Mui-Thurs. Horn Midnight; 
Fri&Sot. lian>3om; Sunday BonyMidnight 

26375 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL 

847-395-1707 

^2^/2^UesWestofRt^9 



Advertise your business 




Sunday c ^Aa4npaane/ ^tuncA 




•Freshest of ingredients 
\ *Made just for you when ordi 

S i t arid;relax in oiir dining aieaiEnipv a . 
^hipsand'sj 

ALL DINNERS JUST 6 95 




Fine Foods -Cocktails 
2816 Rt 120 • McHenry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 




Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner $ 1 1 05 



Home of McHeriry's 



■■.."■ . 



Dinner 

-• 3C 



Sunday ni 
rriusic by 




■»,.-*.■- ,- .. . 



Crtimichanga, Enchiladas, Fajia Platter & Taco Platter.^ ' 

' -All dinners include" tethifc/toniatoes, nae/beahs^acarnole, 
sour cream plus a COMPLIMENTARY MARGART 

Pleose mention this coupon when ordering. Expires 3-1-99. 
"T/3F?" ~ ■"""""""' "si~ £&£ "*■""" ""••©" _"" ■"* ~ ~ ."" T l TJ7ly m 




den Plaza 
Ave; 
eiurnBfstr 




Free Chips & Salsa 
with every order 



1^2ۤi^0^^M 



r??? 6 ;.; 





Dining on the Lake 




On Diamond Lake 

A Reputation far Fine Fobd^Splrltt and Hospitality on BeauU&ii 

DIAMOND LAK^ MUHDELEIN 




rs:/r 
0:303 
0:30^1t. 



a aim smut f HAomoH 

LUNCH AND DINNER- 
PARTY^ AND. BANQUET FACILITIES (30 - 160) 

, Show Lounge Dancing Featuring - 

PETER GUERJN 

Elvis Impersonator 
Friday and Saturday 



906 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundelein 566-1090 



■ lMHM «l llMMMl l Ml l Hm » » H » »»m»M « m t ««««l » 1 1 1MHMM11MU11MMMMM I 



At DINO'S DEN 







• 10:30am -2:00pm 

Ca^irig'Sl^tfoii ^ with^eellind Eat Shrimp 

Chicken Selection 



$14*5 for Adults "SIMS Senior Citizens Over 55 

$fJ5 for Children 1 2 years of age and under 

HEE for Children Under 5 Years of Age 

•Of Equal or Lcucr Value 

Also including... ■ Sausage Links and Chicken Selection mm promt coupon j 

.Carved Breast ofTurkey Hickory Smoked Bacon Pasta of the Day ^ . ^ . >. ^j| I 

Lox Platter with Eggs Benedict FishoftheDay *im fWK *WW mmt, P*f 

Cream Cheese Cheese Blinlzes with Extra Thick French Toast eXp^KOM tW MtiWfj M pjX ; 

Cheese and Bagels ^ Assorted Fruit-Toppings Pancakes ^ rf ^ f^ vfW??^ 1 

Eggs.CooMtaO'rder Belgian Waffles ^'cfcj^iji^iitfP^^ | 



■ > ' » 



♦ #»■•* 



+ * * ■ 



• W f % ■ t ■ • 



10 Gz. Lobster 

Tail, .■•'. . \ . 
Prime Rib 
Chicken Dijon . 
T-Bone . 
Orange Roughy 
Shrimp Dijon 

6-8 Oz. Filet. Mignon & 
10 Oz. Lobster Tail 



■ * * * p * * * t 



9 t * 



48.95 l M 
5 11.95 

- $ 8.95 
s 12.95 

s 9.95 
*12.95. 



'.A\&< 



I 



I 



ZrotftoMnBaw-' MUNDELEIN : 



-_MMMPBMflffl'.'' ' 

510 E; Route 83 • Reservations ^cqmmendedXS^J''. 949-5100' 



w' < r: uiierctpiresj/i/'/J -' iV ' *f »^^ 1 *- "-^ .«-uv.»t««w».« .«.,_«;......,»..««. v « *• y " *" ,- v r j 




2 (3 Ozi<> lobster Tails & 

• N,Y..-- Strip .... . s 22.95 
London Broil . .... 3 7.95 



V 
y 



~7 k 








88 E, Grand Ave/ 
Fox Lake 









. l__,A..l-» .... I *! 






' ■,-■■-:■"-■;*■>■-<- ••^..j.^/.'.r.': •■•*'•<• 



LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 



Fibromyalgia 
support group 

For those who suffer from Fi- 
bromyalgia, Facilitated by Lisa 
Wheeler, RKT, of the Center for Re- 
habilitation at Lake Forst Hospital, 
this group meets the third Wednes- 
day of each month from 6:30 to 7:30 
, p.m. and features a guest speaker. 
Future topics to be addressed in- 
clude: Acupuncture: What's the 
Point?; Sleep: A Restful Night; Nutri- 
tion: Eating Healthy; Medication 
Management; Latest Treatment 
Trends in Fibromyalgia; and Advan- 
tages of Massage. For more infor- 
mation, call 234-6132. 

Ketogenic Diet 
_., support group 

For parents and patients who 
are presently using or considering 
the Ketogenic Diet as a treatment 
for epilepsy. Exchange ideas and 
problem-solve with others, Co- 
sponsored by Epilepsy Services of 
., Northeastern Illinois. The group 
meets every other month on the 
t 4 third Wednesday from 7:30-9 p.m. 
For more information, call 295- 
3619, ext 6801. 

R.T.S. (Resolve 
Through Sharing) 

For parents who have lost ba- 
bies to miscarriage, ectopic preg- 
nancy, stillbirth or newborn death. 
A facilitator leads the informal 
meetings and discussion topics are 
, decided by the group. The group 
. meets the third Tuesday of each 
: month from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the li- 
brary at Westmoreland. For more 
j information, call Jennifer Forsman 
! at 234-6162. 

R.T.S . subsequent 
pregnancy group 

i , For parents who have lost babies 

to miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, 
• stillbirth or newborn death are now ^ 
- expecting again. A facilitator leads 
\ the informal meetings and discus- 
sion topics are decided by the group. 
The group meets the first Tuesday of 
. each month from 7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Health Education Center, rooms 
B/C. For more information, call Jen- 
nifer Forsman at 234-6162. 

LAKE COUNTY 

Immunization 
provided for kids 

The Lake County Health De- 
partment, in conjunction with the , 
Lake County Community Health 
Partnership, offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County children. 

Childhood immunization clin- 
ics are held at the Lake County 
Health Department, Belvidere 
Medical Building, 2400 Belvidere 
Road, Waukegan, every Monday 
and Thursday, from 1 to 3 p.m. (No 
appointment necessary.) 

At the clinics, children can be 
f. immunized against polio, diphthe- 
ria, tetanus, whopping cough 
(D.P.T.), measles, mumps, rubella 
(German measles), and 
Haemophilus influenza, type B 
(H.I.B.). 

Parents are asked to bring their 
children's past immunization 
records. If a child has an immuniza- 
*•'' tion letter from a school nurse, it • 
i should also be brought to the session. 

For more information, and for 
dates and locations of area immu- 
nization clinics, call the Lake Coun- 
ty Health Department Communica- 
' v ble Disease Program at 360-6761. 

Nutritional 
counseling offered 

A registered dietitian is avail- 
•:.»}' able from the Lake County Health 
Department for consultation to eli- 
gible Lake County residents. Physi- 
clan referral required for special 
diet instructions. A physician's re- 
ferral is needed to make an ap- 
pointment. individuals may make 
appointments for the following lo- 
cation: Lake County Health Depart- 
ment office at 3010 Grand Ave., 
Waukegan. 

The dietitian is also available 
forgrbup presentations on nutri- 
, tion topics. Call 360-6753 for infor- 
i mation. 




B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



February 12, 1999 



Diet helps women become pregnant 



Nancy and Gene Alper from Lib- 
ertyville had given up on their dream 
of havingtheir own family. They had 
tried several fertility treatments and 
had approached numerous doctors 
and specialists. Adoption was their 
only option— until they heard about 
a new fertility study successfully be- 
ing put to the test at Highland Park 
Hospital. Instead of drugs, women 
are getting pregnant by changing 
their diets. 

"After a year-and-a-half of un- 
successful fertility treatment we had 
come to the conclusion that we were 
never going to.coriceive," said Nan- 
cy Alper, aged 41. "We thought that 
we would approach the specialists at 
Highland Park Hospital to see if 
there was something else that could 
be done." 

"Thait's when we found out that 
1 had a higher than normal insulin 
level and that was the reason for not. 



. 



hyperinsulinemia. The treatment 
consists mainly of a change of diet 
combined with diabetes medica- 
tions that render a patient's own in- 
sulin more effective," Valle said. 
"Usually, results are noticed 

within 
or 



responding to previous treatment. 

. Jorge Valle MD at the Fertility 
Center of Illinois, based at Highland 
Park Hospital, said: "I began to see a 
pattern emerge that was more 
prevalent in Hispanic and Jewish pa- 
tients, . 
specified- 'The new treatment not only gives couples two 

ly those another chance to fulfill their dreams, it l h r £ e 

tritoL provMesahmlihurwcyofimtoo. ™£% 

weight Patients are astonished to see how a suits are 

problems, change of diet can completely change their w * 1 - 

Valle said. H increase tlieir general well-being, ™ m £t:, 
I am par- ' ,- •„ , , ? t - ■ Pr too, They 

ticularly and provide the best gift of all—a family: generally 

interested _ Include 

. in patients Dr. Jorge Valle weight 

who fail to loss and 

respond to traditional fertility treat- the return of regular menstrual cycles 
ment, and role that elevated insulin 
levels, or diabetes, play in infertility. 
"So far I have tested more than 
30 patients from all across Illinois for 



enabling some couples to conceive 
naturally, Valle said. Those that do 
not conceive naturally generally re- 
spond well to traditional fertility treat- 



ment My first 10 patients are now all 
in various stages of pregnancy." 

"A simple blood test confirms a 
patient's glucose and insulin level. 
The aim of the prescribed treatment 
is to lower the patient's high insulin 
levels," Valle said. Undoubtedly, the 
most important part of the treatment 
is a change of diet We refer our pa- 
tients to a dietitian who regulates 
healthy eating patterns. Like Nancy 
Alper, many patients can regulate hy- 
perinsulinemia through diet alone, so 
for some, there is no heed for contin- 
uous diabetes medication." 

"The new treatment not only 
glves'couples another chance to ful- 
fill their dreams, it provides a health- i 
ier way of life, too. Patients are as- 
tonished to see how a change of diet 
can completely change' their lives, 
increase their general well-being, 
and provide the best gift of all— a 
family," the doctor said. 



Protect children's teeth with dental sealants 



February is Dental Health Month, 
tips for a life-time of good hygiene 



As teeth develop, grooves form 
on the chewing surfaces of back 
teeth. These grooves — or pits and 
fissures — are very narrow and can't • 
be cleaned with regular tooth brush- 
ing. As such, they make a great hid- 
ing place for food particles and bac- 
teria, setting the stage for tooth de- 
cay. 

Dental sealants, though, can 
help prevent cavities on chewing 
surfaces, Sealants are thin plastic 
coatings applied to the chewing sur- 
faces of back teeth. The plastic acts 
as a barrier, keeping food and bacte- 
ria out and protecting teeth from de- 
cay. 

' Your dentist can apply sealants 
in just a few minutes. Once the teeth 
have been cleaned, the dentist 
roughens the chewing surfaces 
slightly, which allows the sealant to 
adhere. The dentist then "paints" the 
sealant onto the tooth. The sealant 
hardens within seconds and can 
protect the tooth from decay. The 
dentist will check the sealants during 
the child's dental examination to 
make sure they are still intact. 

Your child's permanent molars 
should erupt anywhere between the 
ages of six and eight, so it's never too 
early to talk to your dentist about the 
value of sealants. In addition to get- 
ting sealants, your child can work to- 
ward health smile by: 

• Brushing twice a day with an 
ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste 



• Cleaning between the teeth 
daily using floss or an inter dental 
cleaner 

• Eating a balanced diet and lim- 
iting snacks 

• Visiting a dentist regularly 
Smokeless Tobacco - Users are 

Losers 

Chew, dip, pinch, or snuff— no 
matter what you call it; smokeless to- 
bacco is bad news. The whole look of 
using smokeless tobacco is bad — 
from the bulge in your cheek to your 
brown stained teeth. And smokeless 
tobacco does more to empty your 
wallet and trash your looks: 

• Using a can of snuff a day can 
cost up to $1000 a year! 

• Sugars (used to make the to- 
bacco taste better) cause tooth de- 
cay. 

• Sand and grit in the tobacco act 
like sandpaper and wear down your 
teeth 

• Tobacco can irritate your 
gums, causing them to pull away 
from your teeth, which not only 
looks, bad, but also can leave you 
with teeth that hurt anytime you eat 
or drink something hot or cold. 

Then consider the effect smoke- 
less tobacco can have on your body. , 
Just like cigarettes, smokeless tobac- 
co contains nicotine, a chemical that 
causes you to crave tobacco. Once 
you are hooked on nicotine, it is very 
difficult to stop using tobacco prod- 
ucts. Nicotine also increases your 



heart rate and blood pressure which 
can put you at risk for heart disease 
later in life. 

One pinch of tobacco is loaded 
with-other chemicals, too— up to 28 
cancer-causing chemicals have been 
found in smokeless tobacco. These 
chemical cause changes in the cells 
that make up your oral tissues — 
your gums, the lining of your cheeks 
and your tongue — changes that 
could lead to oral cancer. 

C Signals that you may be laying 
the groundwork for oral cancer in- 
clude: 

• Any sign or irritation, like ten- 
derness or burning 

• Development of a sore, usually 
at the spot where you keep the to- 
bacco 

• A leathery, wrinkled or bumpy 
patch inside you mouth 

• White or grayish patches inside 
your mouth 

See your dentist or physician if 
you notice any of these changes. 
Don't let smokeless tobacco damage 
your smile or interfere with your life. 
If you don't use smokeless tobacco, 
don't start If you, are a user, quit. 
Your dentist can give you tips on 
how to kick the habit. '■■ 

Be A Sport— Wear A Mouth Pro- 
tector 

Mouth protectors are not new to 
football or hockey players, out what 
about other athletes? Couldn't base- 
ball or basketball players benefit from 
wearing a mouth protector? they sure 
could. In fact, anyone who partici- 
pates in a sport that could result in 
physical contact should wear a mouth 
protector Mouth protectors can 



cushion a blow to the face, minimiz- 
ing the risk of broken teeth and in- 
juries to the soft tissues of the mouth. 
A mouth protector generally 
covers only the upper teeth. Some 
athletes, though, like those who wear 
braces or those with protruding jaw 
may need a protector for the lower 
teeth, too. A properly fitted mouth 
protector will stay in place while you 
are wearing it, making it easy for you 
to talk and breathe. These are three 
types of mouth protectors: 

• Stock 

• Boil and bite 

• Custom-fitted 

Stock mouth protectors are inex- 
pensive and come pre-formed, ready 
to wear. You can buy one at most 
sporting goods stores, pop it in your 
mouth and hit the field. Unfortu- 
nately, they don't always fit very well. 
They can be bulky and can make 
breathing and talking to your team- 
mates difficult 

Boil and bite mouth protectors 
' also can be brought at most sporting 
goods stores and may offer a better 
fit than stock mouth protectors. They 
should be softened in water, then in- 
serted and allowed to adapt to the 
shape of your mouth. To make sure 
you get a proper fit, you may want to 
ask your dentist to help you. 

Custom-fitted mouth protectors 
are made by your dentist. They cost 
more than the other versions, but be- 
cause they are custom-made they of- 
fer a better fit than anything you can 
buy off the shelf does. Athletes who 
have braces or fixed bridge work es- 
pecially should consider custom-fit- 
ted mouth protectors. 



A listing of the names of ba- 
bies born at Good Shepherd Hos- 
pitalin 1998, reveals that parents 
in the Good Shepherd Hospital 
service area, which spans Cook, 
Lake, and machinery Counties, 
chose more traditional names: 
Michael, Jacob, Matthew,; Kyle, 
and Nicholas most often to name 
their sons, Among the most pop- 
ular and traditional names for 
girls aire Emily, Samantha, Han- 
nah, Lauren, and Megan. 

Names on the rise forboys in : 
elude Alexander, Joseph, Tyler, and 
Joshua; and names on the rise for 
girls include: Ashley, Nicole, Rachel, 
Emma, and Sarah. , 

For the second year in a row, a 
fairly new trend has 
continues-rriaming babies after 
well-known cities or states. The par- 
ents of 45 babies chose names such 



What's in a name? 

Cities gain in popularity in naming 
babies at Good Shepherd Hospital 



as Alexandria, Austin, Boston, Chan- 
dler, Charlotte, Cheyenne, Dakota, 
Eugene, Georgia, jackson, Madison, 
Trenton, or Sydney to name their 
children. 

Parents of boys opting for 
unique names chose Alden, Bray- 
den, Colby, Gage, Hunter, Keyton, 
Mateo, Naveen, Rory, Steele, Thome, 
andVincenzo. 

Parents of girls opting for unusu- 
al '.names chose: Ainsley, Annika, 
Brina, Ellora, Fiona, Jayden, Korlyn, 
Milean, Sage, Teagan, and Zoe. 



Names of famous people or 
celebrities that are popular include: 
Antonio, Brooke, Clint, Dante, 
Dustin, Grace, Morgan, Noah, Pey- 
ton, Selena, Tori, Vanessa, and Whit- 
ney, 

The names with the most varia- 
tion for boys. are Johnathan and 
Nicholas and Kathyrn and Ann for 
girls. 

, Good Shepherd Birth Center sta- 
tistics for 1998 Include: 1,955 deliver- 
ies. Good Shepherd averages 2,000 
births annually, making it one of the 



busiest Birth Centers in the North- 
west suburbs. 

Good Shepherd Hospital is a 
state-designated Level II Birth Cen- 
ter with Extended Capability, which 
means the hospital can provide 24^ 
hour, immediate and continuous, 
intensive care for critically ill new- 
boms with special needs resulting in 
fewer newborn transfers and better 
family bonding. The hospital's new- 
ly expanded special care baby nurs- ' 
ery includes 22 normal newborn 
beds.and eight special care newborn 
beds, and has the flexibility to ac- 
commodate more babies, if neces- 
sary. 

Good Shepherd is part of Advo- 
cate Health Care, one of. Chicago's 
largest health care organizations. 
Advocate is related to both the Evan: 
gelical Lutheran Church in Americe 
and United Church of Christ. 



l 



\ 



Atra 



February 12, 1999 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers/B9 




Sam Musqua Is an Ojlbway elder 
from the Kee see koo ser Reservation 
in Canada. He has been Tribal Chair- 
man (Chief) of his band and spiritual 
advisor to chiefs, as well a respected 
healer and teacher. 



present 



Through his dedication of living 
his life for the people, he: 

• continues to perform healings 
and ceremonies for people through- 
out Canada and the United States. 

• Has performed healings at major 




hospitals from Toronto to.Wlnnipeg. 

• Has been largely responsible for 
getting elders Into the prison systems to 
meet the spiritual needs of prisoners. 

• Is currently working on the de- 
velopment of a traditional children's 




healing center In Wisconsin. 

• Teaches culture and tradition 
through workshops, ceremonies, and 
by example. 

A series of workshops will be pre- 
sented at the Grant Township Hall In 



g 







Ingleside. 

Dates are Feb. 21, March 14, April 
18 and May 16. Cost is $40 persession. 
Pre-registratlon is required. For infor- 
mation and registration, call Carol Ki- 
ralyat497-4704. 




The Aetna U.S. Healthc 



Golden Medicare Plan: 




J* 



Unlimited Annual Generic Prescription Drug Benefit 
. $1,000 Annual Brand Prescription Drug Benefit 



$5 Primary Care Doctor Visits 




$10 Specialists Visits 



$15 Monthly Plan Premium 



What More Can We Offer? 



Call This Number And Find Out. 
1-800-583-5588 

(TDD: 1-800-628- 



There's never been a heller lime for vou In 
compare your Medicare I1MO or .supplement 
coverage to our 1999 benefils. We're convinced thai 
once you do, you'll agree. with us Ihere is no 
comparison. For slarlers, (here is tw\ unlimited 
annual generic prescription drug benefit and 'a 
SI, 000 annual maximum brand-name prescription 
drug benefit. And, it's available with ourSIl 
monthly plan premium. (You must continue lo pay 
.your Medicare premiums and copaymenls for 
prescriptions. Restrictions apply.) Copaymenls lo 
your nelwork primary care physician are only S3, 



tuu\ if you are referred lo a specialist, copaymenls 
cire onlv SIO. . 

There's so much lo feel good about in the 
Aetna -U.S. Healthcare Golden Medicare Plan, we 
iiivile you lo compare il benelil for hcriefil Willi 
I hose plans you may be considering or already 
have. We'll be holding special informative meetings 
over the next few weeks lo (ell vou more, 
find out why so many people are 'switching lo the 
comprehensive benefils we offer. 

Raising the quality ol healthcare" in America. 




US Healthcare 

Golden Medicare Plan 



You must be entitled lo Medicare Pail A and continue to pay your Pari \\ premium and Pari A if applicable. Vou musl use nelwork 
providers except in an emergency or. urgent situation. Aetna'V.S. lleallhcareVof Illinois Inc. has continuous open enrollment, 
(overage provided through I lealllv Maintenance Organizations (I IMPS), some of which arc federally ciualificcl. Medicare+ChoiccUMOs 
have contracts in approved service a reas. Anyone entitled to Medicare Part A and enrolled in Pail n, living in Cook, DuPage, Will, 
Kane and Lake Counties in Illinois and Late County in Indiana, may apply. As wilh olhcr Medicare IIMO plans, benefils, service areas 
and premiums are subject to change on January I ol each year 

IK I \* 7 lilJu'ill • |-"i \i Mm I S l[i,illhi,nr. nl llliiiuivliii 



B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



February 12, 1999 



1*. 



Women urged to Take 
Charge' during heart month 



The message for American Heart 
Month, in February, is "Take Charge." 
Women, as well as the men who care 
about them, are urged to understand 
the risks of heart disease and work 
with their doctors and health profes- 
sionals to reduce them. 

"Heart attack is the number one 
killer of American women," explained 
Dale Galassie, Executive Director of 
the Lake County Health Department 
and Community Health Center. "A 
stroke is the number three killer,, as 
well as a leading cause of serious dis- 
: ability. Together, these two diseases 
kill more women than the next 16 
causes of death combined." Galassie 
added that statistics compiled by the 
Health Department shows this is the 
' case in Lake County. "The most dis- 
turbing statistic is that only eight per- 
cent of women recognize the serious- 
ness of these diseases," he said. 

According to the Health Depart- 
ment, one of the most important 
ways to "Take Charge" and lower 
hour risk of heart disease and stroke is 
to increase your physical activity, ex- 
ercise. Regular physical activity 
strengthens your heart, lungs, bones 
and muscles. It also gives you more 
energy and helps control your weight, 



handle stress, sleep better and feel 
more upbeat If you haven't been very 
active, make sure to ask your doctor 
which activities would be best for you. 
The idea is to start slowly, and even- 
tually build up to thirty minutes a day, 
at least three times per week. 

Another way to "Take Charge" 
Is to eat healthier. Choose the right 
foods to eat, and prepare them in a 
healthful way. Studies have shown 
that a diet low in saturated fat and 
cholesterol may reduce the risk of 
heart disease. Reading labels before 
buying packaged foods can show 
you just how much fat and choles- 
terol are in each serving. Healthier 
methods of food preparation such as 
grilling, broiling, baking and micro 
waving can also reduce fat in your 
meals. 

If you would like more informa- 
tion on how to "Take Charge" of your 
cardiovascular health during Ameri- 
can Heart Month, please call the 
Community Nutritionist of the Lake 
County Health Department and 
Community Health Center at 360- 
6753. A number of free brochures are 
available, as well as a self-assessment 
quiz on your risk of heart disease and 
stroke. 



Kid's nightmares can mean 
something ... Or not! 



Kids sport , fitness fair Feb. 27 

Provena Saint Therese Medical tor Teeth" and "Doctor Feet" will be 
Center, 2615 Washington St., available to talk about teeth and foot 

Waukegan, is sponsoring a free sport 
and fitness for children from 10 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 27. 

Kids can participate in lots of 
fun activities in our auditorium, in- 
cluding a bike rodeo, basketball 
boop contest and fitness maze. Kids 
can bring their favorite stuffed ani- 
mal to pur Teddy Bear Clinic. "Doc- 



care. 

There will also be plenty of 
healthy snacks and door prizes to go 
around. Bring in your kids' bikes for 
a free safety check. An associate 
from Mike's Bikes in Gumee will be ■■ 
there to help you get your kids* hikes 
ready for spring. 

Best of all, admission Is free! 



Dear Dr. Singer, 

Our 7-year-old daughter has 
been having nightmares lately and 
we wondered if this might be Indi- 
cating a problem? We are con- 
cerned that something bad might 
be happening to her in her life and 
she is not telling us. 

We've tried to talk to her about 
It but we aren't getting anywhere. 
It's gotten to the point that she Is 
afraid to go to sleep at night. We 
are very concerned. Should we wait 
and see if it passes or should we get 
some help now? T.G. 

DearT.G., 

While I can give you some gen- 
eral information here in this col- 
umn, I think that It's Important that 
you realize that without my having 
a history and other knowledge of 
this child and your family, it is un- 
ethical of me to give you direct ad-* 
vice unless you want to come in 
and see me. 

I will say, however, that the best 
place you can find that answer is in 
your own "gut." If you are feeling 
that it is out of control or something 
scary might be going on in her life 
to cause these nightmares, it would 
probably be much better for all of 
your collective "peace of mind's" if 
you took her in for a couple ses- 
sions to see someone about this 
problem. 

From your call, it sounds like 
you are very concerned so probably 
best to get her in for help now. 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



Nightmares are strange things. 
They can be directly related to 
something going on in life and then 
again, they don't have to be. Any- 
one who has ever had one, can tell 
you that they are very terrifying and 
can get in the way of healthy sleep. 

I've spoken with many children 
who superstitiously feel that if they 
talk about what was In the night- 
mare, it may come true. So, they 
keep their mouths shut and sufTer 
alone with the thoughts. You might \ 
try to make sure that she under- 
stands that nightmares are just in 
her mind and that talking about it 
won't make it happen. Help her to 
feel safe so she can open up. 

There is also the possibility that 
something is happening In her life 
that scares her. It can be routine 
change (sometimes routine change 
can be the scariest) or something 
out of the ordinary that has either 
made her uncomfortable or terri- 
fied her. Either way, it's worthwhile 
to check it out. 

There is also the possibility that 
she has seen one too many scary 
movies or someone at school has 
told her about something scary. I 
. can remember being 8-years-old 



and having one of our neighbor's 
rotten friends tell me about the 
"legend of Mary Worth." Thlswas 
the favorite story of teenagers at 
that time. The one about the 
woman who supposedly got struck 
by lightening and if you said her 
name enough times at a slumber 
party, she would appear. 

During the sleep-over I was at 
one night, I was told this story, and 
after that, it almost took a search 
party and a crowbar to pry me out 
of my sleeping bag. I had night- 
mares for weeks just from that one 
story. Sometimes, at that age, it is 
difficult for children to separate be- 
tween fantasy and reality. The ter- 
ror from that can be very real. 

Whatever this is from, I think It 
is important to find out and get it 
out in the open so that it can be 
talked about and resolved so this lit- 
tle one can get some good sleep. 
Like I said, it may be worthwhile to 
involve professional help. If you 
need further help with this, please 
call me and we can set up a consult 
about It. 

This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a licensed 
Clinical Psyclxologist, childhood be- 
havior specialist and author of the 
book, "Dr. Singer's Secrets for Light- 
ening Quick Behavior Change. "For 
an appointment, please call (708) 
962-2549. 







I! 



t* ran, 
"ft* 




Bl 






A Resident Swinging in the Courtyard 

SWING INTO ACTION! 

Swinging is just one of a 
number of fun activities at Hillcrest. 

Celebrate with our birthday 

parties, have fun arranging flowers, | 

play bingo or exercise. You will 

find it all here in our newly 

remodeled facility with I 

our friendly caregivers. 

^^^1^^ Won't you come visit us? 

^■C" ^\ 1740 N, Circuit Dr. 

^T r\ w W Round Lake Beach 

I ( HlLLCREST 

t^^ M Nurting Center 

^^^ (847)546-5300 



LAST YEAR 1.50O PARENTS CALLED 

THE YWCA FOR CHILD CARE! 

WERE YOU LISTED ON THE YWCA CARE 

DATA BASE FOR REFERRALS? 

IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY A CHILD CARE PROVIDER 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO BECOME A CHILD CARE PROVIDER 

CALL THE YMCA FOR INFORMATION ON: 

LISTING ON THE FREE DATA BASE FOR PARENT REFERRALS 

SPRING TRAINING CLASS SCHEDULES 

HOW TO START A CHILD CARE BUSINESS CLASS 

ACCESS TO TOY AND EQUIPMENT LENDING LIBRARY 

ACCESS TO VIDEO AND RESOURCE LIBRARY 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE - PHONE AND ON-SITE 

ANNUAL YWCA EARLY CHILDHOOD CONFERENCE, APRIL 10, 1999 

NETWORKING WITH OTHER CHILD CARE SPECIALISTS 

WE ARE THE SOURCE FOR YOUR CHILD CARE NEEDS! 

YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY 

CHILD CARE RESOURCE & REFERRAL PROGRAM 

2133 BELVIDERE ROAD, WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 60085 

(847) 662-4274 Fax: (847) 662-4752 




S5 








Put your Pain in the J5^\ 
hands of a specialist! ^§L 



DR. SCOTT REISER 
ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 

♦Headaches * Lower Back Pain * Sport Injuries 

* Neck Pain or Stiffness or Pain * Whiplash 

* Numbness or Pain * Auto or Work Related 
m Arms or Legs Injuries 



Mid-Back Pain 




Dr. Scott Reiser 



(847) 740-2800 

314 W. Rollins. Rd.-, Round Lake Beach, IL 
(Next to Eagle Foods & Dollar Video) 

Auto and Wort Related Injuries Excluded, But Covered 100% 




X-RAY & EY 



V \ 













I 



sr 



■ 



February 12, 1999 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers^ 



Ann Riley Center i 



Ann Klley Developmental Center 
in Waukegan has received a three- 
year accreditation award by CARF 
(The Rehabilitation Accreditation 
Commission). The award represents 
the highest level of accreditation 
achievable. The center, which Is ad- 
ministered by the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Human Services! was recog- 
nized for accreditation in Mental 
Health Residential Treatment 

"This accreditation Is the first 
awarded to Klley Center by CARF, 



the nation's accreditation authority 
in the fields of medical rehabilita- 
tion, behavioral health, and employ- 
ment and community support ser- 
vices," said DHS Secretary Howard 
A. Peters III. The accreditation results 
from findings during CARF's on-site 
survey In November 1998. 

Since 1975, the Ann Klley Devel- 
opmental Center has provided resi- 
dential services, training and Health 
services to individuals who have a 
developmental disability. The mis- 






sion of the Kiiey Center Is to enable 
Individuals to develop and achieve 
their personal goals by providing 
supports and services and to en- 
hance the person's quality of life. 

"Ann Klley Developmental Cen- 
ter demonstrates quality rehabilita- 
tion programs, measured by rigorous 
standards," said Donald E. Galvin, 
PH.D., President and CEO of CARF. 
"This three-year accreditation Is a 
credit to the high-caliber operations 
of KUey Center and its commitment 



Good Shepherd accreditation renewed 



Renewal of three-year accredita- 
tion for Good Shepherd Hospital, Har- 
rington, has been granted by the Joint 
Commission on Accreditation of 
Healthcare Organizations, the na- 
tion's most recognized health care 
body that evaluates hospital's quality 
of care. For patients, managed care 
organizations and others, accredita- 
tion serves as an index that Good 
Shepherd's practitioners meet na- 
tional standards for quality. 

The Joint Commission's on-site 
survey team at Good Shepherd was 
comprised of a physician, nurse 
and hospital administrator. Areas 
that were surveyed over a three-day 
period last fall included medical 
staff credentialing, medical records 
compliance, Infection -control* 
plant safety and performance im- 
provement. 

"We are very proud of the team- 
work and cooperation demonstrated 
by all Good Shepherd Hospital asso- 
ciates and physicians, both In prepar- 
ing for our accreditation survey and in 
their day- today efforts," said Russell 
E Feurer, Good Shepherd Hospital 



chief executive. "Achieving ac 

tion is another example of the hospi- 

; tal's continuing dedication to provid-, 

ing quality care for all of Its patients." 

The Joint Commission develops 
standards of health care quality in col- 
laboration with professionals, and 
others including the American Hos- 
pital Association, the American Med- 
ical Association, the Amerjcan College 
of Physicians, the American college of. 
Surgeons and the American Dental 
Association. 

"Above all , the national standards 
are intended to stimulate continuous, 
systematic and organization-wide 
improvement In an organization's 
performance and the outcomes of 
care," said Russell P. Massaro, M.D., 
executive vice president, Division of 
Accreditation Operations, Joint Com- 
mission, "the community should be 
proud that Good Shepherd Hospital 
is focusing on the most challenging 
goal — to continuously raise quality 
.to higher levels." 

The Joint Commission's renewal 
of Good Shepherd's accreditation not 
only recognized quality of patient 



care and hospital procedure, but also 
means the hospital will continue to 
receive Medicare and Medicaid reim- 
bursement from the federal and state 
government 

Good Shepherd Hospital is a 156- 
bed health care facility, a Level II 
Trauma Center and Level II Birth 
Center with Extended Capabilities. 
With more than 400 physicians repre:' 
sentlng 35 medical specialties! the 
hospital Is part of Advocate Health 
Care, one of die largest health care or- 
ganizations in the Chicago area. Ad- 
vocate is related to both the Lutheran 
Church in America and the United 
Church of Christ 

Good Shepherd offers state-of- 
the-art surgical services, adult and 
adolescent mental health services, 
a national recognized cancer pro- 
gram and national * recognized 
emergency department, compre- 
hensive physical therapy, rehabili- 
tation, and an extensive range of 
outpatient services and numerous 
on-going community education 
classes, including health and fitness 
programs and support groups. 



Is it t 

to 



' 





your 
checked? 

Thyroid Screening 

17 





3 to 6 p.m. 

Provena Saint Therese Medical Center 

Cost: $10 

Thyroid disorders can cause fatigue, weight gain and anxiety, 
among other symptoms. Left untreated, thyroid disease may 
affect vital organs. A simple blood test can help make sure 
your thyroid is functioning properly. 

to register, call 1 -888-869- 1118 

am Provena 

Saint THerese Medical Center 

What every hospital should be* 

261 5 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
www.sainttherese.org, 



to contlnous quality Improvement" - 
Established in 1966, CARF is the 
preeminent internationally recog- 
nized accreditation authority pro- 
moting and advocating for quality 
rehabilitation services. With head- 
quarters in Tuscon. Arizona, and ac- 
credited organizations throughout 
the United States and Canada, CARF 



develops standards to help organiza- 
tions measure and improve the qual- 
ity of their rehabilitation programs. 
CARF is a privately funded, not-for 
profit organization. 

For additional information about 
Ann Kiley Development Center, con- 
tact Dave Heikkala, Quality Enhance- 
ment office, at 249-0600, ext, 356. 





age co 



Free program open to public 
Feb. 18 at Good Shepherd 



"Image Improvement, My 
Story" is the topic of a special free 
program offered by the Y-ME 

; Breast Cancer Support Group of 
Good Shepherd Hospital on 
Thursday, Feb. 18 from 7:30-9 
p.m. in the Lakeview Room at 
Good Shepherd Hospital in Bar- 

. rington. 

.The talk is open to the gen- 
eral public. 

Guest speaker for the event is 
Karen Lea Cline, Mrsi Illinois 
America 1998 and developer, of 
her own skin care cosmetic line 
called "Lea Skin Care; and Cos- 

- metics. Cline will speak to the Y- 
ME Support Group on the impor- 
tance of looking and feeling good 



on Cancer of the American Col- 
lege of Surgeons. The hospital re- 
ceived this recognition because 
of the comprehensive, multidisci- 
plinary program in improving the 
lives of people with cancer. The_ 
cancer program includes a multi- 
disciplinary approach to cancer 
care including cancer screenings 
and mammograms; referral to 
board certified oncologists and 
surgeons; and an Inpatient oncol- 
ogy unit. 

The Good Shepherd Y-ME 
chapter meets monthly on the 
third Thursday of each. month at 
the hospital; from 7:30-9 p.m. 
Breast cancer patients, their fami- 
lies and friends, and health' pro- 



as partof the recovery process".fot._i_iessionalsinterested Ln the meet- 



cancer survivors. A former nurse, 
Cline moved into the modeling 
and acting field and has over 15 
years of experience in television, 
advertising, movies and commer- 
cials. She is a resident of Barring- 
ton and owneroHLea Image Stu- 
dio" in the Ice House Mall. 

The cancer program at Good" 
Shepherd Hospital has been rec- 
ognized as offering the very best 
• cancer "care by the Commission 



ing are welcome at all meetings. 
The sessions are free of charge and 
reservations are not necessary. 

Good Shepherd Hospital, lo- 
cated on Highway 22 in north 
Barrihgton, is a 156-bed health 
care facility offering comprehen- 
sive cancer care to patients in the 
hospital service area. The hospi- 
tal is : part of Advocate Health 
Care, one of the Chicago areas 
largest health care organizations. 





fair set for Feb. 27 






Provena Sainf Therese Medical 
Center, 2615 Washington St, 
Waukegan, is sponsoring a free sport 
and fitness for children from 10 a.'m. 
to 2 p.mlon Saturday, Feb. 27. 

Kids can shake off the winter 
blahs as they participate in lots of fun 
physical activities in our auditorium, 
including a bike rodeo, basketball 
hoop contest and fitness maze. Kids 
can bring their favorite stuffed animal 
to our Teddy Bear Clinic. "Doctor. 
Teeth" and "Doctor Feet" will be 
available to talk about teeth and foot 
care. Free health information for par- 
ents will also be available. 

There will also be plenty of 
healthy snacks and door prizes to go 
. around. Bring in your kids' bikes for a 



free safety check and learn how to 
make small bike repairs! An associate . 
from Mike's Bikes in Gumee will be 
there to help you get your kids' bikes 
ready for spring. 

Best of all, admission Is free! Chil- 
dren of all ages are welcome. Don't 
forget to bring your stuffed animals 
and bikes! 

Sponsors and participants in- 
clude Mike's: Bikes (Gurnee)/ 
Waukegan Police and Fire Depart- 
ment, Lake County Health Depart- 
ment, Team Fitness (Gurnee), 
Garo Emerzian, DPM, Chris til- 
man, DDS, \AlIstate Insurance, 
Play It Again Sports, Heart Center 
of like County, Martha Jo Church, 
RN. 





FACTS 

From The Foot Doctor 

DR. GRIFF J. WINTERS & ASSOC. 

Specializing in Reconstructive Foot & Ankle Surgery 

INQROWM NAILS are part of a painful, often Infected condition that usually 
occurs at the big toe nail. Ingrown nails can be permanently corrected with an 
office procedure. This allows normal shoe Wear and no time off work. . 
If you have the above symptoms or any other foot discomfort, you may contact 
Dr. Winters for a NO COST CONSULTATION to see If there may be an answer 

to your foot pain. 

"By tha American Board of Pediatric Surgery 



..', 



770 D;inon Blvd. 
(Rlc. 83] 



223-4000 



Grayskike 



I 



i -aaa<aMMMaM'*" aM * 



.i.i.V.k.A. ..^....■■..j^U^y. 



February 12 ' 1999 



LAKELIFE 



B1 2 /Lakeland Newspapers 




Get It Done Right! 







Now Through Saturday, 
February 20 only 

'On carpeting only. Not valid with existing orders or any specials. 



WE 



AROUND? 

HAVe"tHE~LARGEST SELECTION OF ^BERBER CARPETING 

IN ALL OF LAKE COUNTY 







r 



ALWAYS THE BARGAW AT... 



;„' i 



■ : 




TUP I 
I i u II l 



F L O O R I N G 



D E SI ON 



it ' 



740-2700 



/ - 



H 



x 



NON-COMMISSION FLOORING EXPERTS TO SERVE YOU _ 

315 Y/est Rollins Rood (1 Block Vlest of Cedar Lake Rd.) > Round Lake Beach, IL 6007 i 

STORE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8; Fri. & Sat. 10-5:30; Closed Sunday 







La he Land 



D1 /Lakeland Newspapers 



757 NORTH MAJJT 



VffliNl 




Your complete 
car buying guide! 

February 12, 1999 



The right size Dodge Durango 
offers more choices and availability 



One of the biggest success sto- 
ries in the entire industry for 
1998 gets even better for 1999 v 
with greater choice and avail- 
ability. The 1999 Dodge Durango Is now 
offered in a two-wheel drive version, 
with engine choices expanded to Include 
the popular .3.9-liter V-6 engine, also 
available in the Dodge Dakota and; 
Dodge Ram pickups. 

Moreover, to meet soaring demand 
for this "right size" spot-utility vehicle, 
Durango production at Chrysler's 
Newark, Del., assembly plant will In- 
crease to nearly 200,000 units for the 
1999 model year. 

"Last year was a great one for Duran- 
go and 1999 promises to be even better,** 
said Dodge General Manager Jim Julow. 
"By expanding production andfncreas- 
ing the options forour customers, the 
Durango will have even greater appeal." 

Durango set a hew standard in the 
truck-based sport-utility market by 
combing compact SUV handling and 
comfort with full size SUV power and 
passenger-carrying capability. Durango 
is the largest, most powerful and most 
capable SUV In Its class, yet barrows 
many of the agile handling characteris- 
tics from Its compact pickup sibling, the 
Dodge Dakota! Durango is also the only 
compact SUV with eight passenger carry-; 
ing"capability. 

"We have carved out a.unique.territo- 

-ry,\ there's ii ex jdo u b t a b o u t I t , " s atd ^"™ - ' 

Bernard Robertson^ Vice President-Engi- 
neering Technologies and General Man- 
ager - Truck Operations. "We aimed. to . 
build a vehicle that exceeded the capa- 
bility, of its compact competitors, yet 
didn't compromise the driving experi- 
ence." 

Best In class power 

Like all dodge trucks, Durango is the 
most powerful In its class. It also offers 
the widest choice of engines. The 5.9- 
liter Magnum V-8 is the biggest in the 



1999 



. 



K-i 



$ ti 



DODGE 

SMBMS0 

ENGINE: 5.2 liter, V-8, 

TRANSMISSION: 42 RE 

4-speed Automatic ' 

FUEL ECONOMY: 13 city/ 

17 highway 

DIMENSIONS: Length: * 
193.3 in.; Width: 71.54 In.; 
Wheelbase, in.: 115.9 in. 

CARGO VOUJIKS: 88,2 
'cu.ft. 

• BRAKESsPower front 
disc/rear drum w/rear anti- 
lock 4-wheel anti-lock 

• TOWING WEIGHT: 4700 lbs. 
(max) 

MSRP BASE PRICE: 
$27,955.00 
99 FEATUI 



nw:uw:k£ 



• 3.9 liter V-6 engine available 

• Heated 6x9-inch power 
mirrors 

• New overhead reading lamps 

• Relocated coat hooks 

• New exterior colors: Bright 
Platinum Silver & Patriot Blue 

• Upgraded 4x4 steering gear . 

• Two wheel drive available 

• Steering wheel radio switches 
optional 

• Rotary head lamp switch 






■ 






L I.IU. 



■ ■". T- 



! 








compact SUV segment, producing 245 
horsepower and 335 lb.-ft. of torque. For 
1999, the addition of the 3.9 liter Mag- 
num V-6 (175 horsepower, 225 lb.-ft 
torque) gives customers value that ex- 
ceeds their performance expectations. " 
All three engines are mated to a four- 
speed electronic automatic transmission 
as standard. 

In addition to the four-wheel drive 
version that was offered in 199B, Duran- 




Please see DURANGO /D6 1999 DODGE DURANGO 



' Chevy/Olds 



Save 
At The 



* f~hr»vrr"i!o 



ITS THE START OF SOMETHING BIG 



■\x& 





New Look 

7^ ,»x *A \kfU+ ^-n I >-* used vehicles. 

Ana a vynoie bigger savings-Theeief 

N©W AftffUGf© combined buying power 

means lower prices for you. 



Chevrolet 



BIGGER 9vl(->.< tRu-. Fwice tin 



Wit •' lilt' ••! 'U'l llDll 



in- BIG "ii 1 *'- 



i« iu >i* 



199$ 1998 



^ /*k% ft i- 



<^v 



Slktf P2384 Program Car 



Blazers m Cavaliers 



\>\kii P.?i9B Program Car 



>-^T**±**nr^*--i'* 1 



OHSEES^s^Cm^sMglS 





Used Cars at Raymond Chevy/O'ds [ n Antioch 



_< 



■ 
Used Cof3 01 f?cy 1 *?vrc ,l «5i in Fox Lo^e 



1992 Plymouth Voyager 
Slk#1026R- 



1991 Hondo Prelude SI 

Sft#1Q198A__ — 



1995 Bulck Riviera 
Stk#P4T18_ 



1997 Saturn SL1 
Stk#P4248- 



1991 Pord Cargo Van 
Stk #10054/1. 



1992 Pontlac Grand Prix 2- D 
Stk#10054B _ 

1993 Touoia Land Cruiser 
Stk#1027SL 



1997 Olde Bravado AWD 
Stk#1030«JL 



1994 Olds Cutlass 4-Dfl 
Stk #105354. 



1995 Dodge Neon 
Stk#«C 



-$3995 
-$4,995 
.$15,995 
-$11,995 
„$7,995 

§6,995 
CALL 
-$20,995 
-$5,995 

.$5,995 



1967 Chevy Suburban 4X4 

Stk #P4246B_ ' $7,995 

1993 Jeep Wrangler 4X4 
Stk#P4281. 



1994 Pord F-150XLT 
Stfc#10143B_ 



$9,995 
.$14,495 



1996 Chevg K1500 XCab 4X4 

Stk»1012BA ■"•",-; ' ; $20,995 

'1994 SMC Jimmy 4X4 6LE . < *V 
Stk#P42B2 ! $11.995 



1988 Pord Bronco 
Stk #101598. 



1998 Olds Intrigue 

Stk#9953A_ 



1994 Nissan Sentra LE 
5tk#P4387A- 



-$5,995 
.$16,995 
-$6,995. 



1998 Geo TVacker LSI 

Stk #1030IA $14,495 

1993 Pord Bronco 4X4 Eddie Bauer 
Stk #92218 i $12,495 

1994 Chevy Bereita . - ' 

Stk #1D322A _$5,995 

1994 Plymouth Grand Voyager LE _ 

P1P220A ■ ■ . : l$f0.495 

1998 Pontlac Bonneville 6EJ. ;_ 

#P4H8 L_$17,495 



1997 Dodge Ram Pick Up 

#P4na_ $16,995 

1996 Chevy Caprice Classic „ ■ i, -.. 

#1Q24A _ _ $14,995 

1995 Chevy Suburban 3/4 Tan 1 4X4 r 
; Stk »103T7A .$26,995 . 



1995 Chevy G-20 Conversl 

Stk#P24M : : 

1994 Chevy S-10 Ext 4X4 

Slk#5843a. 



1995 Chevy TahoeLS 4X4 

Stk#P247i 



1987 Ford Thunderblrd 
Stk#6663A_ 



1997 Chevy Cavalier LS 

$ft#P2055- 



1997 Geo Prlzm 
Slk#P2134_ 



1997 Geo Prlzm 
Stk#P2ISL 



1994 Lincoln Mark Vlll 

Stk #57558. 



an 

.516.995 

.$12,995^ 

995* 

m 

412.995 
.$10,995 
.$10,995 
-$16,995 



^-$22.« 

ITurbgCc 



1994 Mercury Cougar XR7 

$tk#605Ga___ _^$7;995 

1994 Bulck Century Wagon . A - -^ m 

Slk#2302A $8,995 

1994 Mercury Grand Marqul 
SA#P2435A : 



v* / duui oiuici r t: 

'a/RHIII Dt OrasticaJly I 

V->SVW P'c-Dnveiis W 

\ y 'H ( C11I1I Check Cc 



Botli Stores Feature 100 \ 

Ul [)i;istic;illy Reilnceil 
PiL'-Diiveiis Most Aie 



'JAjiM-:')) Cerlilied Used Vulj>ule'J 



Certified 

USED VEHICLES 



1994 Chevy K2500 Ext . nrKf . 

Stk#P245U $15,995 

1994 Geo Tracker 4X4 Hard Top ,, ■ 

S4 #5767* . - $5,995 

1993 Chevy G-20 ConverstonVcm .. 

S4#P2«3A -^ _$6,995 

1991 Mercury Cougar 
Stk#P883JU 



1990 Chevy Astro CL 
Stk#P2*44* » 



-$5,995 
-$4,995 
.$18,995 
-$8,995 



1997 Chevy Blazer 4X4 

Stk#6653A l—±i^ 

1994 Pontlac Bonneville 

S4 #61841 ^_1_^- : 

1984 Lincoln Town Car 

Sik #«398Ji : __$2,995 

1989 Pontlac Bonneville SS£_ , 

S&#5T80A___ _^$5.995 

1994 Pord Escort xw^i«; 

5k#653W1 •'- .$5,995 



1995 Nissan 4X4 

$tk#6B9iL_ ^^L± _:$11,995 

1991 Chevy Lumlna Euro -., ,„ ■ 
Stk#6037JI . - -' $4,495 
1991 GMC Safari AWD Ext 
Stt#P2461- 



1993 Ford Explorer XLT 

Stk #6510C_ 



1994 Pord Mustang I 
Stk#PTOW' 



_$8.995 
.$12,995 
-$9,995 



... jT^. ■ 

A , V. r ;-mer 
/ '• Of The 
: •- jQ /■ s^~\. s-s^ s^~ f 199c Time 



Route 173 
Antioch 



Chevij/Olds 



n^ 99. sat 9-6 

iervlce M-F7B Set 7om-Moon 



Mocozire 

■ puooiVji 

Deole; 



■?3B^a?S 




£**& 



Sale tiouis. 

M-FO-9 Sc3'9-6 



Chevrolet 



(847) 587-3300 

39 N. Route 12 

^\. Fox Lake 



' ?*•* ;" 



D2 / Lbkelane Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



February 12, 1999 




SKSfeBSraBB 



.' ' . 



(ANSWER AT THE BOTTOM OF THE 



( 98 Park Ave. Ultra '98 Concorde Sedan 



'99 Neon 




..■■•; 




Stock #5859, MSRP $38,18000. 

Knauz Demo Discount -$4,903 
Consumer Rebate -$3,000 



KNAUZ DEMO SALE PRICE 

$30,277 




Stock A96084. MSRP $16,020.00. 



Stock #86610. MSRP $25,21500. 



Knauz Clearance Disc. -$4,218 
Recent College Grad. -$ 400 



Package Discount 
Knauz Clearance Disc. 
Consumer Rebate 
Recent College Grad. 



-$'.'650 

■Si,eo# 

-$1,500 
-$ 400 



•I 

r 



¥■■ • 



Asi&tMHDWARD 



KNAUZ SALE PRICE 

$20,977 



Ask for RON 

.. , ■■-.-.-.-. ■:..-.- ■:■ ■■- -■..; 






KNAUZ SALE PRICE 

$11,506 



Ask for HOWARD: 



.j.).i. -i- 1. 



Disclaimer: TAXES ARE EXCLUDED. All rebates applied. Term restrictions may apply. Credit approval required • see dealer for details. 



AFFORDABLE LUXURY CARS - ASK FOR MARIO 



'89 BMW 5351 STK#. 84453C, WHITE W/GRAY LEATHER, 117,000 MILES, PRICED TO SELL AT ONLY $6,595.00 

'89 BMW 750IL STK# P5012, BLACK W/BLACK LEATHER, 112,000 MILES, AGGRESSIVELY PRICED AT ONLY $7,195.00 

'95 CADILLAC DEVILLE SEDAN STK# 5838A, BLACK W/LEATHER AND ALL THE TOYS, 60,000 MILES AND PRICED AT ONLY $15,995 

'95 CADILLAC DEVILLE SEDAN WHrTE W/50,000 MILES AND ALLTHE TOYS, VALUE PRICED AT ONLY $16,895 

'95 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER STK# 86517A, TEAL GREEN WITH LESS THAN 46,000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT ONLY $11/495 

'91 JAGUAR XJ6 VANDEN PLAS STK# 96127A. LOCAL ONE-OWNER CAR, MUST SEE TO BELIEVE, LESS THAN 70,000 MILES AND ONLY $8495 

'90 LEXUS LS400 SEDANSTK # P50J4A, JADEJWS^ 

'92 LINCOLN MARK VII STK# 96035A BLAaf W/BLACK LEATHER, 83,000' MILK'AND^RICED AGGRE^IVELY AT $6,395 

'96 UNCOLN TOWN CAR STK# 6460RA, WHITE W/GRAY INTERIOR, LOW MILES AND PRICED AT ONLY $17,995 



SUBURBAN DRIVEN FAMILY CARS - ASK FOR HOWARD 



BUICK PARK AVENUE SEDAN STOB5915 A, MAROON, LOW MILES AND NEW BRAKES, VALUED PRICED AT ONLY $8495 

BUICK CENTURY WAGON STK#95042A, ONLY 16,000 MILES. BLUE WA4/OODGRAIN, RECENT TRADE-IN, ONLY $7495 

BUICK PARK AVENUE SEDAN STK# 96104A, LESS THAN 50,000 MILES, BABY BLUE W/CLOTH SEATS, CLEARANCE PRICED AT ONLY $9,995 

BUICK LESABRE STK# 5832A, DARK BLUE W/LEATHER SEATING, 97,000 MILES AND RUNS GREAT, PRICED ACCORDINGLY AT $6495 

BUICK SKYLARK SEDAN STK# 96004A, GREEN WITH LESS THAN 22,000 MILES, A GREAT VALUE AT ONLY $6/195 

BUICK LESABRE SEDAN STK# 95003A, BLUE W/TAUPE INTERIOR, 53,000 MILES, A BEST BUY AT $11,995 

CHRYSLER CONCORDE STK# 96090A, BLUE W/LESS THAN 50,000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT $10,595 

CHRYSLER CIRRUS LX SEDAN STK#P5058A, IRiS IN COLOR, LESS THAN 35,000 MILES, VALUE PRICED AT $9495 

PLYMOUTH BREEZE, STK# P5031, GREEN W/LESS THAN 33,000 MILES,' PERFECT FAMILY CAR ATA PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD $7,995 

SATURN SL2 SEDAN, STK# 95037A, LOADED W/SUNROOF AND MORE, SALE PRICED AT ONLY $10,495 

EAGLE VISION SEDAN, STKtf 96087A, WHrTE W/LESS THAN 40,000 MILES, A BEST BUY AT ONLY $8,995 




•92 
'93 
'93 
'94 
'94 
'96 
•95 
'96 
'96 
'97 
'94 



KWAIWBUDGCTCORIVIEII 

^ASKFORMARiO c" ;; 



'85 CHEVROLET CAVAUER WAGON STK0 9621 0A, RUNS AND 
DRIVES FOR ONLY $995 

'92 CHEVROLET LUMINA STK# 651 6A, LESS THAN 51,000 MILES 
AND PRICED AT ONLY $4,995 

'89 DODGE DAYT0NA COUPE STK #9621 3BB, MILES ARE HIGH 
BUT.STlLL RUNS GOOD, PRICE0.AT.QNDt $1,595.; '.;.; 

!92 HONDA ACCORD LX SEDAN STKtf 96057A, NICE EVERY DAY 
CAR, PRICED AT $6,495 

'92 HONDA ACCORD LX COUPE STK# 5038 MAROON W/GRAY 
CLOTH INTERIOR, PRICED TO SELL AT $5,895 

'89 UNCOLN CONTINENTAL SEDAN STWf 5833B S , BURGUNDY 
W/BURGUNDY LEATHER INTERIOR, VALUE PRICED AT $3,995 

'84 MERCURY COUGAR COUPE STK#5872A, 1JSS THAN 45,000 
MILES, LOCAL CAR AND PRICED AT ONLY $2,995 . 

'88 PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE STK# 96043CC, RUNS AND DRIVES 
FOR ONLY $995 



GEORGE' 



MHVII-VAIMS AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES - ASK FOR GLORIA 



•94 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK#,86576A, BLUE W/WOOD TRIM, LESS THAN 49,000 MILES AND PRICED TO SELL AT $9,995^ 

'94 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK# 96152A, BLUE W/WOOD TRIM, LESS THAN 50,000 MILES, RECENTTRADE-IN AND PRICED AT $10,595 

'94 CHRYSLER TOWN a COUNTRY STK# 96228A, ALL WHEEL DRIVE, READY FOR THE SNOW AND PRICED RIGHT AT ONLY $11495 

'96 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK# P5063, TRULY A MUST SEE, PRICED AT ONLY $17,995 

'97 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX STK# P505O, LOADED W/SUNROOF AND MORE, PRICED TO SELL AT ONLY $20,495 

'94 GMC JIMMY SUV STKtf P5064A, 97,000 MILES AND PRICED ACCORDINGLY AT ONLY $8,995 

■96 NISSAN QUEST MINI-VAN STK# P5046.THIS IS THE NICEST ON THE NORTH SHORE AND PRICEDAT ONLY $14,995 

'92 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER LE STK« 96028A, GREEN WA/VOODTRIM, PRICED TO SELL AT ONLY $5,995 

'97 NISSAN PICK-UP STK# 96073B, 5SPD. W/LESS THAN 6,000 MILES, AND STILL ONLY $6,995 



ItoMjllt^JiJa-iib 




iESSED 



SEE GEORGE FOR PRICING ON OVER 50 BANK REPOSSESSED 
VEHICLES - BELOW IS A SAMPLING OF THESE VEHICLES AT 
TREMENDOUS SAVINGS! 



'93 CROWN VICTORIA SEDAN 

76,000 MILES 



'97 CHEVROLET CAVAUER 

28,000 MILES 

'95 PONTIAC GRAND AM 

70,000 MILES 



SPORTS CARS, COUPES & CONVERTIBLES - ASK FOR MARIO 



■ 



'95 
•96 
'84 
'94 
'97 
95 
93 
'97 
'90 
'94 



CHRYSLER LEBARON CONVERTIBLE STK# P5065, DRIFTWOOD W/TAN INTERIOR, ONLY 26,000 MILES, WINTER TIME PRICED AT $8,995 

CHRYSLER LEBARON CONVERTIBLE STK#86631 A, GREEN W/SADDLE TOR LESS THAN 37,000 MILES, WINTER SALE PRICE OF $17495 

CHEVROLET CORVETTE COUPE STK# 6395RA, RED W/ ONLY 36,000 MILES, PRICED RIGHT FOR YOU AT ONLY $7995 

CHEVROLET BERETTA Z26 COUPE MAROON, WTTH LESS THAN 60,000 MILES, SALE PRICED AT ONLY $4,995 

CHEVROLET CORVETTE COUPE STK W96240A, WHrTE W/GLASS TOP & AUTO TRANS, 12K Ml, SAVE THOUSANDS OVER NEW, $32,995 

EAGLE TALON TSI STK# P5043 BLACK W/LESS THAN 60,000 MILES ON THIS ALL WHEEL DRIVE COUPE PRICED AT ONLY $8/495 

MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE COUPE STK# 6491 B, WHrTE W/67.000 MILES, VALUE PRICED AT ONLY $7,595 

PONTIAC SUNF1RE GT STK# 6505B, TEAL GREEN W/LESS THAN 36,000 MILES, A MUST SEE CAR AT ONLY $10495 

SAAB 900 TURBO CONVERTIBLE STK# P5042, LESS THAN 86,000 MILES, WHITE W/BLACK TOP CLEARANCE PRICED AT ONLY $8495 

SATURN SC2 COUPE STK# 96132A, WHITE W/TAN INTERIOR, 83,000 MILES AND PRICED TO SELL AT $5,195 



'95 NISSAN MAXIMA 

61,000 MILES 

'97 CHEVROLET ASTRO VAN 

14,000 MILES 

'95 EAGLE VISION ESI SEDAN 

71,000 MILES 

'96 SATURN SL2 52,000 MILES '92 FORD ESCORT LX 

'94 MAZDA B2300 PICK-UP 102,000 MILES 

66,000 MILES '95 FORD ESCORT WAGON 

'91 PONTIAC FIREBIRD 56,000 MILES 

72,000 MILES 

'98 CHEVROLET BLAZER TAH0E 

27,000 MILES 

'98 SUZUKI SIDEKICK SPORT 

25,000 MILES ' 

'94 IZUZU TROOPER 87K MILES 

•95 FORD ESCORT LX 

51 ,000 MILES 

•97 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 

27,000 MILES 

'94 FORD PROBE GT 64K MILES 

{ 94 FORD MUSTANG GT 

50,000 MILES 

•94 CHEVROLET CORSICA 

62,000 MILES 




THE ANSWER IS: THEY'RE ALL GREAT DEALS. CALL KNAUZ BEFORE YOURS IS GONE. 






KNAUZq 




1044 N. Western Avenue • 847-234-2800 • www.knauz.com 



wiJftt&-1**Jl •■-■' ■•-"i" 



. 




February 12, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 

^ , 



Lakeland Newspapers t D3 








■ 



.. 



1 I ■ 



I 



V; 



CHRYSLER 

Vlymputfi' 

Dodge 

DadgETruchs 




LAKE COUNTY'S LARGEST VOLUME 

CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-DODGE-DODGE TRUCK DEALER 



SANDY McKlE & STMEFff THANKS YOU (OUR CUSTOMERS) 
FOR RATING EDS #1 DEALER FOR SATISFACTION, SALES, 
SERVICE AND CUSTOMER REFERRALS ' IN LAKE COUNTY. 




NEW 1 999 DODGE DURANGO SLT 



01 LEW POt 




[A 00** 



MO 



#9404-9 

Heavy Duty Service Group, Trailer Tow, Automatic, Air Conditioning, , 
3d Seat, Tilt, Cniw, Power Window, Power Locke, Heavy Duty 
Service Group 5.9 VS. AM/FM Cassette, 31" Tires, Heated Mirrors, 
Fog Lamps, And Much Morel 

M&RP. $30,700** 

BUY S11 TfiTfOO* 



48 MONTH LEASE 



NEW 1 999 RAM 



'. , * 





CAB 4X4 

MLEMIFOt 

00** 




M0 



2i 



mo oom 



t 



JUST SIGN 'N DRIVE!) ■; 



AIL 1W9 MINI. VANS, CHRYSLER, PLYMOUTH, OR DODGE 




LWB, SWB, SE Package, L£ Package, LX, LXI 

ALL MINI-VANS 
IN ™*' 




Stock 19060-9 

139" Wheel Base, Heavy Duty Service Group, Automatic, 
Air Conditioning, 5.9 V8, Anti-Spin, 245/75 Off Road Tires, 
And Much Morel 

M&RP.S2M25* 



MM0NTH LEASE 



s 23,543^ 



Fi41ijm&' 



NEW 1999 





$ 



<* LEASE FOB 



306 



00 

M0 



** 



I m m ^ _. 
PLUS YOU KEEP ALL REBATES 



Stock 16014-9 

Automatic Air Conditioning. Power Windows, Power Locks, Tilt, . 
Cruise, Cold Wealher Group, 16" Wheels Power Driver's Seat, And 
Much Morel 

rrlSJtP.S21.105" 

BUY SIO fjVl'900* 



36 mm LEASE 



mo OWN 



t 



BHHRDINHBnBH 



JUST SIGN <H DHJVEI! 



V^^ArdfarteAp^ 



NO GAMES, NO GIMMICKS, NO 

YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE A SUPER STORE FOR SUPER SAVINGS 

All Prices Clearly Marked On Every Used Car, Every Day Of The Week 

"BUYING A CAR IS NEVER GONNA FEEL THE SAME" 






OFFICIAL 

USED CAR 

GUIDE' 



Ava 

S2000 



CARS I CARS & TRUCKS I TRUCKS | TRUCKS TRUCKS TRUCKS 



'89 DODGE SHADOW ES 

St 111-0777. One Owner. 



'90 FORD TAURUS 

51k. #10-6720. loaded,*? 
'. LowMfe. Cfearanea. 

>3778 



m FORD TEMPO 

no 

La 



S4.IIO-W?7.AT.AC,PW,rT, 
LawMileLQeoronoe 



'95 CHEVY aYAMlWtV 

5t *9-66tf. hfiwKiic , A/C. 

$ 6995 



'95 CHEVY CAVALIER 

St 110-6690.^ Door, Autarkic 



'97 DODGE NEON 

SA-ia^lAukwoScA/C. 
Own 

$' 



ororce. 



'95 CHEVY LUMINALS 

St #1 1 -o798. Ab«. Autorwrk, A/C, 

$ 6995 



'92 NISSAN SENTRA 

St #U-679Z Great 2nd Cor, A/C 

$ 4995 



'94 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

St #11-6796. LoaJod&dra Clean. 
OneOwner. 

$ 9995 



'94 GEO PRISM 

Si. #11-6805, 4 Door, Automdie, A/C 

$ 6995 



'96 CHEVY CORSICA 

St #8-4548. Automate, A/C 

$ 6995 



'96 P0NTIAC SUNRRE SON. 

St#8-65 ffiAutaw fc,A/C. 

UCCtfQOCS. 

$ 8995 



CIRRUS 



'94 

St #12-6818. loifidT&ara Cleoa 

$ 8595 



'94 DODGE SK, 

St #9-6641. Automate, A/C. 

$ 4595 



'95 FORD ESCORT ' 

St #7-6^14. rWJrVTik, Crwii* 

Central. Clearance. 

$ 4395 



'96CKRYSHRCI 

St #9-6674. locMW . 

$ 9595 



'970LDSACH1EVASDN, 

St #8-6574. AU CyL fW, ft, TA, 

Cnj^Ueorora. 

$ 9995 



'97 CHRYSLER IKS 

6576. chr 
boded L 

* 16.995 



St #8-6576.'Svier'» Best, leather, 
fed. ucaranea. 



'97 DODGE NEON 

St #8-6610. loaded. Oeorarm 
$ 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

St #12-6828. A/C 5 Spi 
Great Mk ,±T^ 

$ 10,995 



'88 G20 CHEVY C0NV, 

Sttl-6S80.73KMKN«. 

*2995 



'89 ftYMOirm V0TAGB 

St # il -67741 Book Traramiuian. 

$ 1 595 



'97 P0NTIAC SUNRRE 

St #8-6624, Aufemo*, 
WC, Clearance. 

$ 9995 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS LX 

St #9-6674. AT, A/C, PrV, PL, 

TuLT 



$ 9995 



'96 DODGEINTREWD v 

St#l2-6W.Lc^,C*odM.1ej. 

$ 12,795 



'96 CHRYSLER CIRRUS LX! 

St #11 -6803. Leather, Loaded. 



$ 11,995 



'98 P0NTTAC SAFARI . 

St ta-oSSS X Rear Ai r, PW, PL, T4. 

Qearcocs, 

$ 16,595 



I '98 DODGE STRAWS, 

4 lb Chorm AjtanaHc, A/C Loaded. 

» 1 1.475 



'98CrffiYSlERCpSLXI 

$t #2-6907. loooHteoiW, 
19KMib. 

$15,595 



'90 MITSUBISHI MIGHTY MAX 

St #11-67781 Great lut 

$ 2875 



'90 DODGE CARAVAN 

St"»l 1-6804T. Bate Tmnnim 

$2595 



91 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN Li 

5t #9-66581. Al Wheel Driw. 
Qeoronce. ' 

* 5995 



CLEARANCE 
SALE 



MUST GO! 



'93 CHEVY G20CONV, 

St #12-68271 bdraOean, Rear Air, 

lyycp- 

$ 7995 



'95 RAM 1500 

St #1 -6892T Hn Tw£ SAVE 

>1 1,995 



I '95 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

&IKWmrW.^T»,Crwe, 

LowMifei. 

$ 14,995 



'94 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 

St #8-65711 AT, W,ft.H 
Crow, Sunrool . Clearance. 

$ 12,995 



J 9I DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 

St #1-6901. AtwWyCSoan, 



'91 FORD EXPLORER 

St#U-6KI4TJ^ciTru4& 1 

~L~: . 5 



SAVt 



'98 DODGE STRATUS 

St #12-6828. A/C, 5 Spl, 

.* 10,995 



'93 PlYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER 

StJI2-6668T. Good Mite. 

^7995 



'94 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB 

Stl9-6636T.MceTrodk, 
•■ V6. dearonce.1 

$ 7995 



'94 CHEVY EXl CAB 1500 

St#l-6887T,MSWo3o. 

h 5,995 



'95 P0N1TAC TRANS SPORT 

St #1^68191 Loaded, 

^ Good Wfe. fed 

$ 9995 



'95 JEEP WRANGLER 



DAKOTA S4T 

#8-65901 lie No* Cop. 
Oooranoe. * 

$ 11,995 



'96 DODGE RAM CLUB CAB 

St #l(W727i: 32KMite, PW, PUT* 
■ rjjiicOmrjrirje. 

$ 1 5.995 



'96 FORD F150 SUPER CAB 

St #1-68891 32K Mtejfaded, XII 

$ 14,995 



'95 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOTAGffl 

St #1 -68861 SE PboW loaded. 

M3,W5 



'96 TOYOTA TACOMA 

St f 1-68851 EdnCab, 

11X225. 



'96 RAM 1500 CLUB CAB 

St #12-68901. LooW, Cop, ; 
34K,WW.-_ 

$ 16,995 



'96 RAM 1500 RIG. CAB 

St miMSL SflUtow Edro*. 



'97 RAM 2500 CLUB 4X4 

St #1 -68981 SIT. Long Bed, VI0, 
Loaded. 

$ 21,325 



'97 RAM 2500 

St #1 2-6858T LongBei Oh, 4*4, 

M9^995 



'97 SIO BLAZER 

St #1067341 LoodVlXDfW 

M 6,595 



97 DODGE DAKOTA 

BedLPW.H, 



St #12-68291 V8, Long Bed 
Ttpwe^CajB. 

$ 1 3 ,9 9 



'94 CHEVY WTTSOOP/U 

5M12-6830T.&jdWorklnji 

^15,995 



'95 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

■ St#l-M96 i PW J PL_ 

$ 14,995 



^CKWSLSTCWN.COWMLWB 

St (lO^UeatW, loaded. 
Clearance. 

$ I8 X 56£ 



'94 DODGE CARAVAN 

St #y6o6QT. Boile Trommiuion. 
Clearance, 

$ 10,995 



'96 DODGE GRAND CARMN SE 

St •10-6689T. IcorHPW, PL, T»,- 
CruHe. Oeorance. 

$ 13,995 



'96 CHRYSLER T&C 

St#12-6^6mieotVlooded. 

^15,995 



'96 RAM 1500 CLUB CAB 

St #12-68591 4*4, SIT, PW, PW. 
SAVE, 

$ 17.991 



'98 DODGE 

^26,995 



'98 GRAND CARAVAN SE 

" 3JbChowe.Loodad,JeorAir 

$ 1 8,695 



'98 CHEVY 15 SIO EXl CAB 

St #11-67451 MJlVkTiOwM: 

14,995 



•i 1 



'96RAMi5004X4Sir 

St #12-68561: LooW,<£cd_Maei. 

* 16,995 



.>12-6824IR»arAir,PW,Pl, 

■ Til, Cruse. 

* 13,995 



MANY MORE 
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OVER 1 50 
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IIIKiMlK 
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*Sa Habla Espafioi* 



91 S. Route 12 in Fox 





D4 / lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE February 12, 1999 



Pouly Acura 

Routas 41 & 22, Highland Park 

433-8200 



^-t> J-***-**, 



ySOD 

Audi 

Tha Audi Exchange 
5050 First St, Highland Park 
432-5020 



© 



Karl knauz Motors 

407 Skokie Valley Hwy, Lab Bluff 

604-5000 



• Buss Ford 
3925 W. RoutB 120, McHonry 
(815) 385-2000 

■ Fox Lake Ford-Mercury Inc. 
90S. Rcuto 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

• Lyons-Ryan Ford 

104 W. Routo 173, Antloch 
395-3900 

• Celozzi Ford 

3100 Grand Ave. (Rtt. 132), Waukegan 
336-2340 

• Sessler Ford Inc. 

1010 S. Mitwaulct Ave.. Ubertyviltt 
362-4550 

• Victor Ford 

Route 12 (N. of Rta. 176), Woucondo 
526-5541 



• Knauz Continental Motors 
407 SkoUo Hwy., Lake Bluff 
234-1700 



S 



UtllCK- 



• Anthony Pontioc/ 
GMC Truck/Buick 

2727 Belvidsre Rd.(Rti. 120). Woutegon 
244-1010 

• Knauz of Lake Forest 

1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 
234-2800 

• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Pork Ave., Libcrtyville 
362-2683 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobilo & 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
(815) 385-7200 

• Country Buick/Pontiac 
845 Main St., Arttiach 
395-4400 



Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Buick 
2727 Belvldere Rd., Waukogon 
244-1010 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobilo & 

GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 

(815) 385-7200 

Patrick Pontiac-GMC Truck Inc. 

1120 S. Milwaukee Ave, Libcrtyville 
680-5000 

Pedersen GMC Truck 
Corners of Rtes. 45 & 173, Antioch 
395-3700 




• LibortyvillQ Mitsubishi 

1119 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libcrtyville 
816-6660 

• Liberty Nissan Kia Volkswogen 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libcrtyville 
680-6000 

• Union Nissan 

3315 Grand Ave. (Hie. 132], Wouktgan 
244-8000 

<2> Oldsmobile 

• Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundai 

Rtt. 41 & Wcuhington St., Gumtt/Wsultgon 
249-1300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Route 173, Antloch 
395-3600 

• Weil Oldsmobile/Cadillac Inc. 
1050 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libcrtyville 
362-4100 

PONTIAC 



T5S 




• Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc. 

1050 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libcrtyville 
362-4100 

• Gary Lang Pontiac- 
Cadilloc Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 



• Pauly Honda 

1111 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-4300 

• Rosen Honda 

Rte. 132 (Grand Ave.), Gurnee 
623-7673 




CHEVROLET 



*'*~Bemaitf"Cfiivro1e^uzLi~~ 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-1400 

• Boehmer Chevrolet 

416 W. Liberty (Rte. 176) Wauconda 
526-2424 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

425 N. Green Boy Rd., Waukegan 
336-4300 

• Gary Lang Chevrolet 
1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-2100 

• Roy Chevrolet Inc. 
39 N. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Lake St. (Rte. 173), Antioch 
395- 3600 

• Rockenbach Chevrolet 
1000 E. Bolvidero Rd., Graysloke 
223-8651 

• Shepard Chevrolet 
930 Carriage La, Lake Bluff 
234- 7900 



• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Park Ave. (176), Libertyville 
360-2683 

• Gurnee Hyundai VW-Olds 
Rti. 41 & Waihington St., GumetAVoukegan 

■v— -249*130 "'' ■ ' -■« -■ '■ * ii . '. — ■' 



-• Anthony Pontiac/GMC Truck/Buick 
2727 Servicer* Rd. (Rte. 120), Waukegan 
244-1010 

• Gary Lang Pontiac Cadillac * 
& Subaru 

1107 5. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 

• Patrick Pontiac GMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-5000 

• Country Pontioc/Buick 
845 Main Street, Antloch 
3954400 



~..\. 



<& 



ITI 



INF I N 

• Fields Infiniti 
1121 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-9200 



ISUZU 



Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-1400 



The Porsche Exchange 
2050 First St. 
Highland Park 
432-5020 



till 



The Saab Exchange 
2300 Skokie Valley Rd. (Rte. 41) 
Highland Park 
432-9300 



Jeep. 




CIIHttlER 



• Knauz of Lake Forest 

1044 N. Western Ave,, Lake Forest 
234-2800 

• Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth 
Jeep/Eagle 

130 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 
356-2530 

• Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4B10W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 



Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte. 83, Antioch 
395-0200 

Fohrman Auto Mart 
2725 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan 
336-3510 

Milter-Krueger Dodge 

119 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
362-3800 

Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 

Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St., McHenry 
(815)385-7220. 



Country Jeep-Eagle 
3017 W. Route 120. McHenry 
(815)363-9999 

Delf'sieep 

1521 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan 

623-1492 

Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 

130 Cedar Ave., Loke Villa 

356-2530 

Liberty Jeep Eagle 

1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 



LAND 
'ROVER 



• Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N. Skokie Hwy, Lake Bluff 
604-8100 



SATUIN. 

Saturn of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 

362-6600 

Saturn of Waukegan 

500 S. Green Soy Rd., Waukegan 

360-5000 





Mi nun <j 



• Fox Lake Ford/ 
90 S, Route 12, Fox Loke 
587-3400 

• Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury Inc. 
941 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
367-1700 

• Lyons-Ryan Ford -Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
104 W Route 173. Antioch 
395-3900 

• Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
660 W. NW Hwy., Barrlngton 
382-5600 

• Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 

100 N. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 
623-7673 



z r A m _ 



Libertyville Auto City 

1000 £. Pork Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 

Rosen Mazda 

100 N. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 

662-2400 



Gary Lang Pontiac Cadillac Subaru 
1111 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 

Liberty Subaru 

1000 E, Pork Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 



SUZUKI 

A J. jiiuHK'HhiiimnMHH-' 

• Liberty Auto City 

1000 E. Park Ave., (176) Libertyville 
362-2683 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 
336-4300 

• Pouly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy., Crystal Lake , 
(815)459-7100 




• Liberty Nissan Volkswogen/Kia 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-8000 ' 

• Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 
Rt«, 41 & Woshinglori St, Gurnei/Woukegon 
249-1300 . 

VOIiVO 

•Fields Volvo 

. 1121 S. Milwaukee Ave,, Libertyville 
362-9200 



'Extension...' warranty. 



Car dealers make promises all the time. One 
local auto retailer actually keeps them. Ray- 
mond Chevy Oldsmobile on Route 173 is con- 
tinuing to live up to its pledge of "community 
Involvement" This time, its St. Peter's School 
located at 900 St Peter's Street, that finds itself 
the beneficiary of the dealership's generosity. 

For the next several months, St Peter's 
School families local financial institutions and 
Raymond Chevy Oldsmobile will be working 
hard to sell as many $10 raffle tickets as they 
can before the Parish's annual "Block Party" on 
July 10th. The raffle's prize is a brand new 1998 
Chevy Blazer, donated by Raymond Chevy 
Olds, but the true winners of the event are the 
school's teachers, students and parents whose 
"Extension 2000" building fund receives all of 
the proceeds from the drawing. 

The "Extension 2000" program hopes to uti- 
lize the monies raised through the Blazer give- 
away to build four new, much needed, class- 
rooms and a teacher ; s work area for St Peter's 
grade school. Raymond Chevy Olds hopes that 



Its contribution is enough to ensure the pro- 
gram's success. 

"This is such a wonderful opportunity for us 
to give something back to this great communi- 
ty," said Mark ScarpeLH, dealership principal at 
Raymond Chevy Olds. "We know that our chil- 
dren's education is an important issue, that's 
why our dealership is committed to not only 
donating the Blazer, but selling a lot of raff] e 
tickets too. We want 'Extension 2000' to be a 
big success." 

The St Peters Parish and School's "Block Par- 
ty" event will also feature entertainment, food 
and a refreshment tent and is open to the gen- 
eral public For more information on the 
School, the "Block Party" or "Extension 2000," 
please contact St. Peter's School at (847)395- 
0037. 

To purchase tickets for the July 10th drawing 
you can stop by Raymond Chevy Oldsmobile 
118 Route 173 In Antioch or call (847)395-3600. 
Antioch financial institutions also have raffle 
tickets for sale. See your local bank for details . 




'-. 



Dealership in Lake Forest 
caters to individual needs 

Ray Reilly, General sales man- 
ager of Knauz Buick Chrysler-Ply- 
mouth of Lake Forest, learned the 
basics of customer service as a 
teenager helping his father carter 
big dinners and society wed- 
dings. 

Growing up in Wheeling and 
now a resident of Lake Villa, Reil- 
ly recalled his business indoctri- 
nation with a chuckle. "When a 
family is spending $20,000 for a 
wedding you learn in a hurry how 
to please." 

"I call it the 'Knauz Golden NEW FACES AT K NAUZ IN LAKE FOREST 

every day at the Buick Chrysler- i°™ e ™ e <**j £0 buW a ' e t from e , ft: B f gW 
Plymouth dealership located at Certified Jeep and Dodge Truck technician; Lori Van 
1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest, Heirseele, Knauz Business Manager; and Howard 
only a few blocks north of the na- Sullivan, Sales Associate, 
tion's first shopping mall, historic 
Market Square, talking to cus- 
tomers and personalizing their 
service. 

Knauz divides his time be- 
tween Lake Forest and the new 
Knauz Auto Park on Rte. 41, Lake 
Bluff, a bold new venture for the 
entrenched North Shore business 
featuring import cars. Knauz still 
is a family business, nephew, Axel 
serving as service director for Mer- 
cedes and daughter Kim Madden 
serving on the office staff. 

The combination of Knauz tra- 
dition, service orientation and sta- 
bility appeals to Reilly who is em- KNAUZ OFFERS EXPERT COLLISION REPAIR 
ploying new marketing strategies steve Miller, Knauz auto body technician, replaces 
to surmount an identity problem the rear floor pan of a BMW 528 which was recently 
that resulted from a record of sue- | nvo | ved In a rear collission. Knauz offers complete 

° n ^hTv^7afcaTa7Lake «"■' «"" locations as well as the general public. 
Forest, a reputation for individual hallmark. Reilly said Howard Sullivan, a for- 

attention to every customer want and service mer human resources executive, and Gloria 
policies beyond compare," stated Reilly, Wilhelm with 20 years sales experience typify 
whose goal is opening up new avenues to the friendly, low key Knauz sales personal the 
Knauz in downtown Lake Forest, which traces public encounters when they visit the West- 
its beginning back to the Wenban family that em Ave. location noted for displays of aWorld 
began selling Buicks in 1909. Buick became War I era Buick touring sedan, a 1931 movie 
part of Knauz in 1998. star style Chrysler roadster and an original 

Reilly sees a parallel between the success gasoline pump from Karl Knauz* service sta- 
in recent years of Lake Forest Hospital serving tion. 

Reilly points with pride to a new customer 
newsletter being unveiled, the anticipated 
awarding of Chrysler's 5 Star service desig- 
nated in June and a renewed emphasis being 
put on service for Jeep and Dodge Trucks. ' 

The addition of Jeep and Dodge truck ser- 
vice is being handled by Ed Kane, a certified 
mechanic who fulfills the Chrysler 5 Star de- 
mand for technical expertise running from df- 
home expecting to return to work at Algauer's agnostics to major repairs, 
where my dad was catering manager. There Also at Knauz on Western Ave. is a on-the- 

wasn't an immediate opening so my sister premise body shop equipped L to make any car 
steered me to a dealership in the suburbs. I and an inventory of 80 to 100 used cars. Ser- 
sold 32 cars in 30 days and decided this is vice customers can take advantage of a free 
what I wanted to do," Ray explained. ioaner policy by scheduling an appointment 

Reilly aims to capitalize on the Knauz rep- Ray offered a humorous description of 

utatlon of stability.. "Our average employee the Knauz Golden Rule: "This is not a trip to 
has between five and 10 years tenure. Our se- 
nior technician has been at Knauz 32 years," 
A no pressure, no haggling policy is a Knauz 




all of Lake County and expanding Knauz 
Buick Chrysler-Plymouth. "You can come to 
LAke Forest for both health care and car 
care," remarked the genial manager, who be- 
came an automotive sales specialist 12 years 
ago during a 30 day trial with a suburban 
dealership. 

"I had been working in food and beverage 
management at several Florida hotels: I came 



the dentist." Knauz Lake Forest also can be 
contacted atwwwknauz.com Another Inter- 
net contact point is Knauz LF@AOL .com. 



i 

1 



February 12, 1999 AUTO MARKET PLACE Lakeland Newspapers /D5 

FR0MWGED1 





; A great Dodge success 
story; more choices for 1999 model year 



go is now available in two-wheel drive 
configuration for 1999. 

"The two-wheel drive Durango ex- 
tends our reach both geographically, and 
economically,'' Julow said. "Some of our 
customers- in southwestern states for 
example-need the towing, 1 ong-hauling 

and passenger-carrying capability of Du- 
rango, but won't be faced with many sitr . 
uattons that require four-wheel drive. 
And the more economical two-wheel 
drive version will attract buyers who 
thought they would never be able to get 
this much vehicle within their budget." 

There are several interior enhance- 
ments on the 1999 Durango, such as a ' 
unique seating configuration on the five 
, and six-passenger Versions that Increas- 
es leg room for rear seat occupants by 
two inches. Other features include op- 
tional remote audio for the rolling door 
locks and horn and heated mirrors. 

Two exterior colors-Patriot Blue and 
Bright Platinum Metallic - and one inte- 
rior color -Agate-are added for 1999. 
Dark Chestnut is discontinued as an ex- 
terior color. 

Capability is a Dodge hallmark and 
Durango lives up to its siblings in that 
area; The 5.9-liter Magnum V-8 delivers 
a segment-best 7,300 lbs. maximum toe 
rating when equipped with an option 
Class IV hitch, more than 1,800 pounds 
in an interior package that boosts 88 cu- ' 
bic feet of volume with the seats folded 
down. A unique floor plan depression 
creates an additional storage compart- 
ment behind the rear axle for concealing 
gear, while a second, larger, compart- < 
ment replaces the footwell when the op- 
tional third- row package^ is not ordered. 

Durango's interior space efficiency 



means comfortable seating for eight with- 
out creating a vehicle that is too big and 
hard to manage. A widened Dakota chas- 
sis allows interior room to be increased 
while providing a place to store a larger 
gas tank and put the full size spare tire un- 
derneath the vehicle. Durango's roof is 
raised nearly two inches from the second 
seat rearward to increase passenger head 
room. The roof change is hidden beneath 
the roof rack to provide a consistent visual 
line from the rear of the vehicle. 

The rear seats serve as both a com- 
fortable area fpr passengers and - when 
repositioned - a flat load floor. The 
uniquely designed second row of seats 
for and tumble forward, providing easy 
third-row access for passengers or im- 
proved storage capability. The optional 
third row folds in conjunction with the 
second row to form a flat surface from 
the liftgate to the front row seats. 



TEST DRIVE THE 

00D6E 

DURANGO AT 



FOHRMAN DODGE 

2725 BELVIDERE RD. 

WAUKEGAN 

336-3510 

AND 

SANDY McKIE & SONS 

91E. ROUTE 12 

FOX LAKE 

587-6471 




. 





fthidK*! 





Lgnt can 
drive line, suspension performance 




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H»m.tH I .MH |i i ll 11 



Altering ride height for cosmetic reasons 
may result in rave reviews from friends and 
colleagues, but the effect on the vehicle's 
drive line, suspension and alignment can 
result in high heat build-up in the. drive 
line, binding in steering, suspension com- 
ponents, tire wear, vibration and prema- 
ture failure. 

"Ride height is the angle that all wheel 
alignment angles are built around and 
should be kept.within manufacturer speci- 
fications for optimum performance of the 
entire steering, suspension and drive line 
systems," explains A! Lynch, manager of 
technical seiyicesfor MOOG Automotive..^ 
On light trucksrfor example, the steering 
linkage* has a designed operating range, 
which helps to minimize normal-road force 
exerted on individual steering components 
such as the pitman arm, idler arm and tie 
rod assemblies. 

"The result of increased chassis height.or 
an over-loaded chassis can contribute to 
increased linkage angles," says Lynch. 
"This increase in angles can accelerate 
wear and lead to failure of these steering 
components. Under someconditions, the 
load may be sufficient to bend, the idler 
arm bracket." 

Drive line performance also is affected by . 
improper vehicle height in both light 
trucks and passenger vehicles. Lynch re- 
ports, "Excessive height change may force 
the universal joint in light trucks to operate 
out of the desired angle range, producing 
vibration and joint failure." 
"Placing drive line components such as CV 
joints, and rubber CV joint boots in extreme 
angles can cause damage to those compo- 
nents. Incorrect vehicle height can cause 
continuous high joint angularity making 
the joint work harder and creating more 
heat. It also can cause the convolutions on 
rubber CV boots to chafe and wear (see il- 
lustration below)!", 

Lynch recommends making a quick visual 
inspection and road. test to determine the 
condition of the CV joint boots, regardless 
of whether ride height_has : been intention- 
ally altered. "Begin by placing the vehicle 
in park on a level surface and, turn your 
wheels completely to the right to expose 



the rubber bellows of the CV joints," says 

Lynch. 

"Examine the boots closely for cracks, 




foobw 

splits and grease spray around surrounding 
parts. Make sure the clamps are tight and 
in the proper locations. When driving the 
vehicle, listen for a clicking noise' in turns, 
which usually results from wear in the out- 
er CV joint". 

"If you hear a clunking noise during accel- 
eration or braking, that's usually due to a 
worn inner joint. And if you feel a shudder, 
that usually indicates a worn or sticking in- 
ner joint. If any of these conditions are de- 
tected; it's time to visit your service techni- 
cian." 

"No alignment adjustment can restore a ve- 
hicle to proper operating condition unless 
chassis height is within the manufacturer's 
specification," adds Lynch. "In the long 
run, improper chassis height can be unsafe 
and uneconomical, causing handling prob- 
lems and robbing tires of their maximum 
tread life." 




* r a y * •* tJt * 

rketplace 

■■ *»—" ^ «\w^ Your complete 



Q q ,j a t> o 

..-V-T-Th-^ 



<, o * *■ - • °t^ 



.webautomarKm 



Your complete 
car buying guide! 



Look In 

Lakeland 
Newspapers' 
Automotive 
Classifieds 
every weekl 



• £v ££ 



\ 



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i 



D6 /Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE February 12, 1999 

Miles and dollars 
ahead with the old car 




If car repair bills have infected you with 
new car fever, "sticker shock therapy" could 
be a quick cure. Car Care Council suggests 
that the down payment on a new (or new- 
er) car may more than cover the cost of fix-' 
ing up the old one. You'll have acquired a 
car you know from its previous owner 
(that's you), someone you can trust. 

When considering this option, be ob- 
jective. Visit with a mechanic who can do 
a comprehensive inspection of the old car. 
He can compile a list of its mechanical 
needs and prices to put it back in good 
shape. Then, sharpening your pencil, fig- 



ure how much you'll save each month by 
giving the car a new lease on life. 
With proper repair and maintenance the 
car can be serviceable for another few 
years, during which time you can be saving 
toward its replacement. When you're ready 
to make a deal you'll have a better car to 
■trade. 

For more information on this subject, 
send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to 
the Car Care Council, Department SS7-XI, 
One Grande Lake Drive, Port Clinton, OH 
43452. Ask for their free pamphlet on giv- 
ing your car a good "physical". 




Premium Certified Used Cars- the finest selection in the urea! 



Chicago Auto Show to have 
first-ever Friday opening 



For the first time, the Chfcago Auto Show 
will be open to the public a day earlier than its 
traditional Saturday morning launch. The, 
Chicago automobile Trade Association (CATA) 
has chosen to open the nation's largest auto ex- 
position to the public at noon Friday, Feb. 12 
and run through Feb. 21 1999. The show;s First 
Look for Charity black-tie preview will be held 
Thursday evening, Feb. 11, from 7-10:30 p.m. 

"The new dates reflect an important- 
change in how we've constructed our show 
schedule," said Mike Cook, Chicago Auto Show 
chairman. "We have shifted, not shortened, 
our media preview to spread over two days in- 
stead of three. This clears an extra day that we 
can open to the public, which will help to 
lessen the crush of people we experience on 
our weekends." 

Weekend crowds at the Chicago Show av- 
erage over 155,000 patrons per day. Total at- 



'*** .'.'"i 1 - 1 — "* * -ff?-** r * i _**■* ~^2* 



tendance for the 1998 show was 1,080,637. 1 

"The shift in the media preview schedule 
will not affect the number of news conference 
slots available to manufacturers,"' said show 
general manager Jerry Cizek. "We'll lead with 
the Midwest Automotive Media Association 
(MAMA) breakfast Wednesday morning and 
fallow with conferences through Thursday af- 
ternoon for world introductions, executive 
availabilities and other newsworthy activities 
for the media." 

Founded in 1904, the CATA has blossomed 
to over 800 members, representing six Illinois 
and two Indiana counties. The CATA is the old- 
est and largest metropolitan dealer organiza- 
tion In the country with more than 56,000 em- 
ployees in its member dealerships. New car 
sales in CATA dealerships are approximately 
$16.4 billion with total sales of more than $24 
billion. 



87 Chevy Nova Sedan 

Memories are made of those 

91 Olds '98 Regency 

Old Time Class 

92 Geo Tracker Convertible 

Special Paint, Sharp 

93 Ford Escort Wagon 

AT, WNte 

93 Plymouth Voyager SE 

Beautiful, Loaded 

95 Saturn SL 4 dr 

5Spd, A/C, Wmty 



*995 
$3,595 
$3,895 
*4,995 
$5,995 
*5,995 

94 Chevy Cavalier Sport Coupe c r\s\r- 
AT, A/C, Clean *0,ZJZ)D 

94 Dodge Duster Sport Coupe,*/* a A C 
AT, Burgundy 9 D,4U9 

^6,995 
$8,995 



94 Mazda MX3 
Very Clean 

95 Ford Mustang 

V6, Low Miles, Clean 



95 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4 Dj 

AT 4x4 

96 Toyota Corolla <4 a aac 

Sharp, Only 25,000 Miles! * 1 U , y i? Q 

98 Ford Ranger XLT pickup 

Only 12,000 Miles, Wmty 

97 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 SE 

Soft Top 

96 Honda Accord 

5Spd, 17,000 Miles 

98 Chevy Cavalier Z24 
AT, Sunroof, 9,000 Miles, Red 

97 Dodge Work Van 

26,000 Miles, Great Buy 

95 Pontlac Bonneville SSE 

Leather, Sunroof I 

96 Cadillac Seville SLS 
26,000 Miles, Extra Clean 

98 Ford Expedition XLT 

Leather, Roar A/C & Heat - 



*i.0,995 



•12,900 
$12,995 
$12,995 
$13,995 
$14,495 
$14,995 
$24,995 
$27,995 



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ONSTRUCTION 




Our construction crews are making it possible for us to become Gurhee Dbatemjune^fe really need to sell our new 

Dodges for lots less right now, so that we qui earn additiorud new Dodg« lor our new store, 

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NEW 1999m 



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•m-Cn** • Body Stic Moling • Puwcr Wlmlowi ♦ From/Rear Ptnvcr Omlrts 

• Air ConcfamhTR • R«r \\**kw Oct • FWrbxti * Stodl * D7Z91 

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SMPIfrgne • RarBtanper • 16 GiUm Furl Tank « Puvw 5<rmnf; 

•Automatic • GOOAMTMalnbnanrx* FuSSkcSpsDrTkc • SiiWtM Sled ftdm&i Sjs. 

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LEASE FOR ONLY; W IH #36mos. DmvOW 



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95FordThimdcrbirdlX 






95 Plymouth Neon 

Btxk. Coupe. Auto, Ar, Cassette— 



94 Ford Mustang 

Ster. Auto, 41k rtks.C)ejn_ 



93 Saturn SQ 

RtntAu'Afe.SumictMPottff 

92 Potitiac Grand Prix LE 

Jado. 4 OoaJ-uty loaded. 



.58,498 
-S5998 
.$9,998 

_ $6,998 



-$4,998 



91 CHds Cutlass Cruiser Wagon 

Blue, 62,758 rite, Clean, AI Thelbyi $5,998 



IMPORTS 



"97 Honda Accord LX Cpc. 

QurgurOy. Auto, Loaded, lew flics '. 



97 Hyundai Accent 

Green, 3 Door Halchback. Can EcononicaL 
95 Toyota CamryLE 

Write, (kM Package, AIPovw Options 

92 Nissan Maxima 

Whte, loaded, Auto, Slurp. 



92 Mitsubishi Mirage 

Qurgundy. Sedan, Lew ttJes, Clean 

92 Nissan Scntra 

Gray, Sedan, Air, Cruse. Cassctto 



$1000 down plus first payment, security deposit, plus tax, title & license. Must qualify for all rebates. 




FOHRFSAM SELECT PRE DRIVEN VEHICLES 



_$15,298 



.$10,598 
_$6,498 
_$3,798 
_$2,998 



98 Chevy S-10 ExL Cab 

Black, 10,2861*5, Auto. 

97 Cltcvy 1500 Conversion \an 

Burgimdy, 11,628 ttts. loaded :_$18,498 

95 Chevy S-10 Blazer 

Teal 4i4, loaded. Sharp- 



95 Dodge 1500 dub Cab 

tike, 511 Package, 2WD, Auto, 



94 Dodge Dakota Club Pick-Up - 

$9,998 



Green, Ffcergtos Cap, Auto, Ar_ 

W Chevy S-10 Blazer 

Grav, V6, Auta, Aj Cxxidnxifiine 




YOU'R£ 

Asuom 



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Certified Dealer - 



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On The 

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Wit -\ln\tiii; InC.miuv hi |uiw l l)lH > IUt imiin^l •iinnv Ktotlpr! I oi Vt t>Ml*l III lisiiugOl Out Inuiiiiuv \\?u> \Iir.uls MomiI In \\>\v\ miiinvtliHlj^* .mm 



A GREAT 



Oldsmobile ° 



ark City's Used Car 



^ Volkswagen 



February 12, 1999 AUTO MARKETPLACE Lakeland Newspapers /D7 




I 



■*.'.■*...'-■ : - ' 





j >—-' 






:.J^-;'>i---i 







:■. 



"-*«.,.< . ' : " 



* ■ MmimQI 



It's a premium 
celebration like no 



Sierra 3500 HD with Dump Body. 



.Sierra 3500 HD with Slake Body 



" 





) 



/ 



~s 



"* r '* ' 



Jetfa Fesf Days Held Over! 

Wednesday, February 10 •Thursday, February 11 
" ;n/H2 • Saturday, February^ 3; ' ' 



i>m vehicles 








1 





W/.C: 



ir fciTimSi n 



ismstHa 




FEBRUARY SPECIALS 



Mf«v- ■rf^-'^T| 



97 VWdettaCSL 

AC, 25,000 Miles 

'. -J * 



A Minimum 6 Month/6,000 Mile 
Warranty Available on all Used Gars 



• ML™ 



1999 GMC 
JIMMY4X4 






t'«» A'^i ; 



^V^''^*fi 



^BW^WWl 



87WUJetta 
93VWJetta 

94 VW JettaGL 

95 VW JettaGL 
93VWEurovan 

96 VW Jatta GL 

97 WW JettaGL 

96 VW Jetta GLS 

97 VW Jetta GT 



96 VW Passat GLX 



♦2.595 
*6,995 
»7,995 
*8,995 
*8,995 
H 2,995 
•1 2,995 

•13,995 
M 3,995 
*1 4,995 



98 VW Jetta GLS 
^97WVCabrio 
*?96 VW Jetta GLX 

93 Hyundai Elantra 
95 Hyundai Scoupe 
98 Hyundai Accent 
95 Hyundai Sonata 
.98 Hyundai Elantra 




1999 GMC 
SAFARI^ 



- 



SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 

1997 GMC 3/4 TON 4X4 EXTENDED CAB 454 

UB. AUTO. A/C. BUCKET SEATS. LOADED. QHLY Z9K MILES! 



, s»*j*«is, 05% far 36 moirths 
£££< 33% for 60 months 




SELECTED USED TRADE-INS 



TRUCKS 



TRUCKS 



CARS 




1997GMC1TONCReWCABDUALLY 

ttWUMHrfe JUST 
BxttSe&lDaded.GttEeaty REDUCED 



1997 GMC SJiMMYSlE 4X4 

» w . $18,995 



v 



19HCHeVROI£ri/2TOKEXnai»CAB4)GI 

VB.Aito.ACLoated, ^MfP 
WfcssCajx OHVE 



1994 FORD BRONCO 4X4 

Va,A*iV6hAr.............0| 



5995 



1996 GMC 1/2 TON SUBURBAN 

6,0(30 Mj6S '••••\Jw\ lh 



1995CHEVYS-10BLA2ER 

totffc, pleaded...,,.. 



1995 CHEVY 1/2T0N! 
SPOmSIDE $1 



1993 DODGE DAKOTA 



2x4, VB, 
5 speed, air. 



$1 



1996 P0NT1AC GRAND AM 

4Door.Vfflte....... $'< 



10,995 



1994 ME 




1989 CHEVY 3/4 TON 4X4 



1988 GMC 1/2 TON 4X4 

«»&*, $ 6995 



SMC 



ff«M r 




1993 BUiCK REGAL 
4M«, SQAQR 

lowl.fe5.Qm *rt3J 



1992 LINCOLN T0WNCAR 

VBLWotA<XlB*aiaBfln SflQQR 

tefe&OAMusiSee Ua5W 



1992CHEVYLUMINAAPV 

V6 t AutomatJc,Air, $£ME 

•*ftf10%0 



PEDERSEN GMC TRUCK 

"toe Ttvck Peiple" Finnwrii 
ANTI0CH, IL • 847-395-3700 









nwniiww 



D8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



February 12, 1999 



■ 



i 



Si 



■ 



7 



Treat your car to 
high maintenance 

i » 

Transmission, water pumps, filters, and that is a direct descendant from racing re- 
hoses are, without a doubt, parts of your car search. This tire can take you from the heat 
which require maintenance and replace- of the southwest desert to the rainy northwest 
ment to keep your car running efficiently, forest. 

But what about the four essential compo- Choosing the right tires, and subsequent- 

nents that keep your car rolling on the road? ly caring for them, affects their driving per- 
Tlres, which play an integral role in enhanc- formance. In addition to reading your vehi- 
ing your car's performance, are the most fre- cle owner'? manual and being aware of ser- 
quently abused and oftentimes overlooked vice intervals for your car, Yokohama recom- 
components of your car. mends long-term maintenance for your tires 

Before purchasing new tires, there are a to get the most life out of them as you can. 
few things to keep in mind. The type of ve- Here are some ways you can increase the life 
hide you own often reflects your lifestyle of your tires. 

and personality. In turn, the type of tire you First, visual inspections are important en- 

fit your vehicle with should reflect a per- suring that the tires are void of any cracks, 
sonality that Is suited to your driving habits punctures, or pebbles and stones lodged in 
and conditions. Understanding these key the tread. Secondly, the inflation pressure of 
factors will help you choose the right tires the tire needs to be examined at least once a 
and also extend the life of those tires. . month since loss of pressure may eventually 

When it comes time to select replace- result in irregular tread wear and poor gas 
ment tires for your car, consider the type of mileage. 

vehicle you drive and your regular driving Third, proper tire alignment, rotation and 

conditions. When driving on city streets, balancing can further add to the life.of your 
you will experience many stops and turns, tire. Rotating your tires frequently will bal- 
whereas when driving along a highway, you ance out the wear on the tread, which will 
drive at higher speeds. These daily condi- prove to be important when driving through 
tions highlight the importance of having cities and on the highway. Correct alignment 
the correct tire to offer you the type of per- may even prevent suspension damage. If you 
formance you need. The type of vehicle you normally drive over potholes or on rough 
own determines the general size of the tire roads, the alignment needs to be adjusted on 
to be fitted on your vehicle, 
but alternative wheel pack- 
ages and plus sizing options 
can greatly enhance the 
aesthetic appearance of 
your tire and wheel combi- 
nation, and your vehicle's 
steering stability. 

The geographic location 
and weather conditions un- 
der which you drive can af- 
fect your tire's life span. Var- 
ious tread patterns are de- 
signed to meet drivers' 
needs in dry, wet or snowy 
conditions. Do you drive 
off-road on snowy moun- 
tain trails or trek along 
rocky hill paths on a daily 
basis? In such. cases, you 
are probably driving a 
sports utility -vehicle or 
light-truck and a more ag- 
gressive tire tread pattern 
would come in handy. Next, 
consider the weather. Do 
you encounter snow storms, 
torrential rains, or very hot 
and dry climates? Such 
weather conditions require 
tires with specific tread pat- 
terns and performance 
characteristics which will 

meet your needs. To avoid tire damage, check for proper inflation pres- 

to matter what kind of sure a t (east once a month and before long trips. The 
vehicle you drive, the only Dest me thod is to use an accurate air pressure gauge 
connection between you on tjres that are co(d to tne toucn . According to Yoko- 

SIS rSih^wrht ™Sh?u hama Tire Corporation, a tire is underflated if it is four 
!te,&1Sf^ind?ffi or more pounds per square inch below the recom- 
Rick Brennan, manager, mended level, which is usually listed on the sldewall 
consumer products for or on a placard in the car's glovebox 
Yokohama Tire Corpora- 
tion. "Given this fact, consumers should a regular basis. Furthermore, unbalanced 
understand the importance of proper tire tires will cause your steering wheel to vibrate 
maintenance and choosing the right re- at high speeds, which will ultimately affect 
placement tires." your ride comfort. 

After taking all of the above elements And last but not least, daily mainte- 

into consideration, you can narrow down nance of your tires is also important. Sim- 
which tires are best suited for your vehicle ply keeping your tires in mind when corner- 
and physical road conditions. For example, ing and braking will extend the life of your 
A light truck or SUV vehicle fitted with Yoko- tires. Remembering that quick starts or 
hama's Geolander H/T will deliver excellent stops along with hard cornering accelerate 
handling and stability' in rain, sleet or snow tread wear, is an additional consideration in 
.without sacrificing ride comfort. Designed daily upkeep. 

as a passenger tire, It offers remarkable day- "Start gradually, take corners easily and 

to-day driving, while also providing off- anticipate interruptions in traffic flow that 
highway capabilities. may require braking. These driving tech- 

For those who require an ultra-high per- nlques, combined with the proper mainte- 

formance, all-season tire, the AVSS4 provides nance, will help extend the life of your tires," 

" optimal performance designed for "touring" concludes Brennan. 

vehicles and sportier cars as well. The AVS S4 Remember, research and preventative 

does not make a sacrifice between high per- care are the key to maintaining your tires: 





formance driving capabilities and excellent 
wet and snow traction. 

. If you require an all-weather radial, the 



You will notice that a little consideration 
and proper maintenance of your tires will 
take you a long way. Treat yourself and your 



ILLINOIS SALES TAX ...INCLUDED! 

REGISTRATION/PLATES..INCLUDED! 

ACQUISITION FEE. INCLUDED! 

SECURITY DEPOSIT.. ..NONE! 
MONEY DOWN NONE! 




AUTOMATIC 'LEATHER -SUNROOF 'HEATED SEATS 'CD & CASS. 'POWER MEMORY SEATS 



LEASE $ 



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FOR 39 



With approved credit. Chicago residents add 6% use tax. 

HBST COME...FIRST SERVED! 




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2300 §»n» Road (847)432-9300 

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A Div. Off Semersky Enterprises, Inc. 



AVID MD-H4 Is a unique performance tire car to some high maintenance!* 







. r 






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'J 



' 



Februrary_12,1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 






Lakeland Newspapers / D9 



Cars for Sale 







BUICK 1962 REGAL, 2- 
door, good condition, Inside 
and out, needs work, 
$450/b03l. (847) 395-4248. 

OLDS 1987 CUTLASS 
CI ERA V6, aulomallc, low 
mileage, power stoor- 
Ing/brakcs, NC, perfect; leath- 
er Interior, dream car, must 
see to appreciate, 
$3,000/best. Call Judy or 
Chuck (847) 58 7 -1759. 

CORVETTE" 1892 CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition, 
(615) 305-8468. 

HONDA 1982 CIVIC LX 4- 
door, automatic transmission, 
A/C, all power except locks, 
cruise, control, AM/FM cas- 
sette, excellent condition, •> 
70K, $6,000/best. (847) - 
543-9558. ' •■ 

900S CVT., 1995,. $17,950. 
(647) 432-0300. 

AUDI A4, 1998, $17,990. 
(647) 432-5020. 

AUDI A8, 1995, $18,890. 
(847) 432-5020. 

AUDI A5, 1995, $19,990. 
(647) 432-5020. 

AUDI CABRIO 1998, 
$21,990. (847) 432-5020. 

BMW 1989 750IL, $7,595. 
(847) 234-2800. 

BMW 325E9 1906, sun roc!. 
leather Interior, good condi- 
tion, $3,500/best. (847) 
560-7908 evenings. 

BMW 5351 1989, $6,995. 
(847) 234-2800. 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking $1,500/best. (414) 652- 
7952. 

BUlCK 1992 RO ADM AS- 
TER, black,, mint, condition, 
low miles, 1 -owner, great car, 
_ S8,9O0/best. (647) 392-5263. 

BUICK 1994 PARK AVE- 
NUE SEDAN, $6,995. (847) 
.... 234-2800. - : 



CADILLAC 1990 SEDAN 
DEVILLE, beige, matching 
leather, 117K, sunroof, ga- 
i raged, very clean, $5,000, 
; (B47) 680-1228. 

CADILLAC 1995 CON- 
COUPS, $12,997. (847) 507- 
3400. 

CARS $200 & UP Pollco Im- 
pounds. 1980'8-1997's Hon- 
das, Chevys, Jeeps & Sport 
Utility. Must sell. 800-772- 
7470 ext. 7040 {SCA Net- 
work). . 

CARS FROM $500 
Police Impounds 
AndTax Repo's. 
For listings call - 

1-800-3 19-3323 

ext. 2292. 

CHEVROLET 1995 GM 

SONOMA; 59,000. miles, 
$5,995. (414) 652-6430. 

CHEVY 1990 CAVALIER 
Z24, 5-speed,' excellent con- 
dition, 83,000 miles, cherry 
red with gray Interior, $4,500. 
(847) 949-3948, (847) 949- 
3974. . 

CHEVY 1994 CAMARO, 
$8,995.(847)360-5000. 



CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 

$6,995. (647) 587-6473. - 

CHEVY 'CAPRICE CLAS- 
SIC 1992, loaded/extras, ex- 
cellent, new ABS computer, 
76K. $6,995. (414) 878-5423. 



CHRYSLER 1996 CIR- 
RUS, $9,595. (847) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1994 SHADOW 
(Sport • Package), 4-door, 
am/fm cassette, tilt,- rear de- 
fogger, hatchback, 56,000. 
miles, power locks, excellent 
condition, $6,500/besL. (847) 
872-6515 aftor 5pm. 

DODGE 1997 NEON, 
$7,595. (847) 587-6473. 



EAGLE TALON 1996, 
24.000 miles, 5-speed, excel- 
lent condition, asking 
$6.000/best. (414) 634-1273. 

EL CAM1NO SS 19G9 Big 
block, 4-speed. 1986 IROC 
Z28, fully loaded, big block, 
parts car. Best offer. (414) 



EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 
USED CARS 

'.We take consignment cars, 
No Charge. 
To o busy to s el I y ou r ca r7 
Let us do it for you, 

(847)740-1400 

1 16 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lako Beach, 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1985 MUSTANG 
CONVERTIBLE, needs 

some work, has extra parts: 
doors, fenders and rims. 
$2,500/best. (414) 653-0857. 

FORD 1987 TEMPO, 58K 

original, miles, minor surface 
rust, runs great, $1,100/bost. 
(414)862-7525. 

FORD 1989 PROBE LX. 5- 
speed, high miles, runs great, 
$2,100/besL (414) 537-4121. 

FORD 1992 TEMPO, 

$4,988, (847) 587-3400, 

FORD 1993 T-BIRD, 
$7,995; (647) 587-3300. 

FORD 1893 TAURUS 
WAGON Interstate car, excel- 
lent/well maintained, 125,000 
miles, ready to go, $5,500. 
(847) 358-5434 evenings, 
(847) 356-2530. Dan Jeffries. 

FORD 1894 TAURUS STA- 
TION WAGON GL, loaded, 

'mint. condition, no rust, no 
dents, no scratches, Interior 
like new, garage kept, 1-owrf*- 
er. $5,500/best. (847) 

• 824-4633; 

FORD 1995 ESCORT, 
$4,395. (647) 587-6473. 

FORD 1895 ESCORT, 4- 
door,. green, good condition. 
S7,000/best. Call for details 
(847) 310-1455. 



FORD 1995 THUNDER- 
BIRD, $9,988. (847) 587- 
3400. 

FORD 1996 CONTOUR, 
$9,986. (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1996 CONTOUR, 
$9.995. (647) 360-5000. 

FORD TAURUS 1991 LX 
WAGON, fully loaded, leather, 
moonroof, 1 -owner, good 
condition, 100K, $6,500^(847) 

, 35&-;7083. . t— . » ■»«■ — ^. y ii rn 



GEO STORM 1995, 

$3,988. (847) 587-3400. 

GRAND PRIX 1887 fully 
loaded, 305 VB, class II hitch, 
$4,500/bOSt. (847)'S87-S901. 

HONDA 1991 PRELUDE 
SI. $4,995. (847) 395-3600. 

HONDA 1992 ACCORD 
COUPE, $5,795. (847) 234- 
2800. 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD, 
$8,995. (847) 3364300. 

HYUNDAI ELANTRA 

1993, $3,995. (847) 249- 
1300. '. 

HYUNDAI 1996 ACCENT, 
$4,995. (647) 336-4300. 

HYUNDAI ACCENT 1996, 
$7.995. (847) 249-1300. 

HYUNDAI SCOUPE 1995, 
$5,995. (847) 249-1300, 

JAGUAR XJ6 1994, 
$19,850. (847) 432-9300, 

LINCOLN 1992 MAR VII, 
$6.995. (647) 234-2800. . 

MAZDA 1992 PROTEGE, 

for parts or sale. Black, engine 
1.S, manual transmission. 
(847) 336-5457. 

MAZDA RX7 1991, $6,995. 

(847) 587-3300. 

MERCEDES 420SEL 

1986, $12,950. (847) 432- 
9300. 



MERCURY 1984 COU- 
GAR, $1,995. (847) 234-2800. 

MERCURY 1969 SABLE, 

great condition, dependable, 
many new parts, $2,450/best. 
(414)249-8708. . 

MERCURY 1890 GRAND 
MARQUIS LS, smoke free car, 
exceptionally clean, 

$3.40Q/firm, (414) 657-0765. 

MERCURY 1998 COU- 
OAR, $8,995. (847) 3364300. 

MERCURY TRACER 

WAGON 1993,- $4,988.'(847) 

5B7-3400. ' " 

MITSUBISHI 1984 MON- 
TERO, excellent condition, 
low miles, automatic, air. CD, 
green. Blue book $18,600, 
asking- $16,500. ^(414) 
862-9622 «v©nti* 




MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
(lac Sunflre, 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9.900.(847)438-4180. 

NISSAN 1091 . STANZA, 
$3.795. (847) 587-6473. 

NISSAN 1992 SENTRA, 
$2,996.(847)336-3510. . 

NISSAN 1997 ALTIMA, 
$11.995. (847) 336-4300. 

OLDS 1997 ACHIEVA 
SON, $9,995. (647) 587-6473. 

OLDSMOBILE 1994 

ACHIEVA, $5,995. (847) 338- 
4300. 



PLYMOUTH 1995 NEON, 
$3,595, (647) 587-6473. 

PLYMOUTH 1996 

BREEZE, $7,995. (847) 234- 
2600. ■ 

PONTIAC 1992 GRAND 
PRIX LE, $4,998. (847) 336- 
3510. 

PORSCHE 924S 1988, 

$4,998. (847) 336-3510. 

SAAB 1990 9000CD black, 
4-door sedan, excellent condi- 
tion, loaded, leather. Interior. 
Best offer over $5,000. (847) 
, -^ 606-O03B» - fr ■•■ !> ■;■»■> " *■■ ■'•■- i m« 



SAAB 900 TURBO CON- 
VERTIBLE 1990, $7,995. 
(847)234-2800. 

SAAB 9000 CSE 1997, 
$25.950. (847) 432-9300. 

SATURN 1995 SCI, 
$7,995.(847)3364300. 

SUBARU 1994 LEGACY, 
$8,995, (847) 587-3300. 

TOYOTA 1998 CAMRY, 
$13,995. (847) 336-4300. 

TOYOTA 1998 COROLLA, 
$11,495.(847)360-5000. 

TOYOTA 1997 TERCEL In 
excellent' condition, 5-speed 
transmission, power steering, 
air, excellent stereo and CD 
player, $9,200/bost. (847) 
' 367-4213 after 4pm. 

VW JETTA GL 1997, 
$12,995.(847)249-1300. 

VW PASSAT GLX 1998, 
$14395.(847)249-1300. 

WOLBERG JETTA 1999, 
perfect, 5,700 miles, has It all. 
Automatic, power, CD, bike 
rack, custom Interior trim. Buy- 
ing VW bus for extended road 
trip. $17,990. Female own- 
er/driver. (847) 543-1965 
leave message, 



Service & Pats, 



BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5, 6,7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mills Mlglla 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
Ures. 50% tread left, wheels In 
good shape, $700. (847) 548- 
1115. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang. Cam- 
aro, Nova. Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Ponllac, Chevrolet, 
morel TRUCK PANS. FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. New and Califor- 
nia. Rust free. MARK'S PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-624-6184. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page to 



. 




/ Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



February 12, 1999 



-<<*. 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



■mwwBui 



Vans 




CHEVROLET 19B9 HIGH 
TOP CONVERSION VAN, 
TV & VCR Included, excellent 
cbndillon,$3,800/bBSt. TOYO- 
TA 1086 4-RUNNER, Flori- 
da Truck, good condition, 09 K, 
automatic, A/C, $3,500/bosl. 
(847)740-7841. 



CHRYSLER 1990 TOWN & 
COUNTRY MINI VAN, loaded, 
leather, alloys, dual heat, 
hitch, excellent, 95K, $6,800, 
(647)546-7991. 

CHRYSLER 1994 TOWN & 
COUNTRY, S9.595. (847) 234- 
2800. 



DODQE 19SS RAM 2500, 
full size 8- passenger, well 
maintained, good condition, 
114K highway mltos. 
$10,S00/best. (815) 

363-6008, (815) 455-3592. 

FORD 1985 WORK VAN, all 
new brakes, dual block heater, 
ladder rack, Olamond Plate 
Steel Bed, runs great, 
t3,000/best. (414) 889-8940, 

FORD 1992 E-150 CON- 
VERSION VAN, $10,988. 
(847) 587-3400. ' 



FORD 19S3 AEROSTAR 

XL. $6,995, (847) 587-3400. 

FORD 1993 AEROSTAR, 
$4.995. (647) 336-4300. 

FORD 1993 CARGO VAN, 
,3/4 ton, power steer- 
ing/brakos, new trans., excel- 
lent condition, $B,450/bost. 
(847) 361-5536. 



PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER, $4,500/best. (414) 
279-6370 alter 5pm. 

PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

1992, $3,995. (847) 395- 
3600. 

VW EUROVAN 1993, 
$8,995. (847) 249-1300. 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



CHEVY 1987 S-10 BLAZ- 

ER, $2,498, (847) 336-3510. 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 BLAZER 
$14,995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1993 LTD EXPLOR- 
ER, 4WD, 4-door, loaded, mid 
miles, Drawtite with plug Iri 
hitch. Must sell. (847) 
746-1849. 

FORD 1996 EXPLORER 
LTD. The max In luxury SUVs. 
All black with grey leather In- 
terior. Loaded. Moonroof,. CD 
stack, phone, 42K miles, ex- 
cellent condition, well main- 
tained. Sllll under 50K extend- 
ed service plan, $23,900. 
(047) 609-5380. 

GEO TRACKER 4X4 1994, 
$7,495, (847) 587-3300. 

GMC JIMMY 4X4 1992, 
loaded, $5,500, (414) 
843-2041. ' 

GMC JIMMY 4X4 SLE 1994, 
$11,995.(847)395-3600. 

ISUZU AMIGO 1993, fully 
loaded, $5,500/best. (847) 
973-0128 or voice mail 1-800- 
255-4659 ext.4689. 

JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT 
1992. $9.988. (847) 587-3400. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
1995, $15,995, (847) 336- 
4300. 



JEEP WRANGLER 1997, 
$12,995. (847) 360-5000. 

JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 
1994, $9,998. (B47) 336-3510. 

JEEP WRANGLER SA- 
HARA 1989, 6-cylrndor, 4.2L 
engine, hard top, groat tires, 
good condition, $3,200/best. 
(647) 223-1602 after 5pm. 



NISSAN 1994 PATH- 
FINDER SE. $12,995. (847) 
587-6473. 

OLDSMOBILE 1994 BRA- 
VADA, $10,995. (847) "336-" 
4300. 



Trucks/Trailers 



1975 F600 6YD. DUMP, 
$3,000/best. (414) 878-^3952. 

FORD 1980 3/4 TON 
PICKUP TRUCK with 8ft. 
Western Snowplow blade. In 
great shape, - Housed Inside. 
$2,800. (815)344-1878. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA 

4x4 cab- 1/2, LE package, mag 
V6, 1-owner. Must bs seen at 
72 Eagle Point Rd. & Rt. 12, 
Fox Lake, III. $7,800. 

CHEVY 1993 Z71, pickup, 
loaded, perfect condition, tow 
miles, (847) 746-9004. 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
CLUB PICK-UP, $9,998, (847) 
336-3510. 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
SLT. $11,995. (847) 587-6473. 

FORD 1994 F-150, $9,995. 
(847) 587-3400. 



FORD 1994 RANGER 
SUPER CAB, $7,995. (847) 
587-6473. 

FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylln- 
der, slick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage, 
$6,500/besl. (847) 3565949. 

NISSAN 1997 PICK-UP, 
$6,995. (847) 234-2800. 



Snowmobltcs/ATVs 



1995 POLARIS TRAIL 

INDY, 2800 miles, excellent 
condition, with cover, $2,400. 
(847)949-7854., . 

1996 POLARIS STORM 
Like new condition, 750 miles, 
'Dad's retiring from snowmobl- 
llng,' $4,000/firm. (815) 
759-0837. 

ARCTIC CAT 1995 700EFI, 
low miles, must sell, $3,000, 
(630)434-8910. 

KITTY-CAT SNOWMO- 

BILE 1998, less than Stirs. 

. use $1 ,000/bBSt. .. (847) . 

546-8662: . 




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YOU'RE 
READING 
A WINNER! 



LaheLand 

P.U*B,L ISHE R ■■'& 



And the 
judges agree 



This year, at the Illinois Press Association Awards, Lakeland Newspapers 

brought back an arm load of honors- 11 in all- which is just one more accolade 

that tells us you are reading a quality product each week. 



■^'tsimm. 







Quotes from Best of the Press: Mi 



das 



NIWSFAPER Mil ON 

FIRST PLACE: 

'Crmliyoul, 

eicrikn \ cholrt of body copy 

■nd linillln* fonli. Qetn 

ipncinncr, good ui*of color 

ovrreU, Adt offer « viritty of 

typography wd irt inlet. 

Local newt ilinctlvrfy 

packaged ind emptuubM 

mad* thli rntiy nind oul 

among the competition. 

Conpiliiliiiorulo 

lllalfwhoobviouilycWM 

■bout Lha cornmunliy!" 



IllfclifUaniUnW 

PES 

it * k^ . - „ .<* 






NEWS STORY 

FIRST PLACE: 

LCIIS fjigltih leachtt flrrd. 
Jaten I.King. 

UonFttas 

•WeU-wrltlrtvleBi 

■ compelling iiory. Good iu« of 
the tcachrr'i letter 
attempting to eiplainhlnueU. 
Great Job on ■ remlti™ tonic that muii 
ryonalnlhi 
ifty talking. 



m-t mm ■"—. ; 

hik&tfe*. 



1? 



Ltitdlftiun 



■lil 



UFUTVLC SECTION 

FIRST PLACE: 

LaktllfeSttilon 

"Very high quality; tletlspi it 

wtU thought out and clean. 

Llulngi are broken up by 

mlnl-itorlet, good feature* 

vwlcolwrmi.* 



have Imi everyone in the 
un unity l 



• UUmUJ 
•A«rtcmJr»rWl 



THIRD PLACE! 

— Tomdttk 



UtftHtmt—RaipbtnjprrUTvrt, 
tlttabtthEaltn 



HONORABLE MENTION: 



, origin CoIbbuI— Ll/i'i a Star, Donna Abtar 



• Agric«llw«/lMlaM( KiftilUt-Farm torn* 

b*au iteptr, Kmntlh Patthtn 

• FMbn Uory— Eucultt* Ordtrs. Iron filar 

• Nadu* Mw>(o*jxaf*y- K/VfAr^nnfi 

asa Hu~,$antfy8tminir 



I Me rr-Hr. SOO, Bmdan GNtiU 
- I | ill H <*«!■■ ■ fir ihi Tnnihn, 

Btindan Q'NiiU, Iron Ftint 





Lakeland Publishers, Inc. & College of Lake County 

I) '99 Health and (I 

I^^Fitness Fair • 



FREE ATTRACTIONS 



Face Painting • Blood Pressure 

Stress Relaxation Tapes 

Home Health Care Items 

Bod/ Fit Testing • First Aid Kits 

Complimentary Guest Classes on Fitness 

Chair Massages • Posture Exams 

Arthritis Screenings • Diabetes Screenings ' 

Toothbrushes *And Much More! ' 



DON'T MISS THIS ONE!!! 
Saturday, March 27, 1999 

10:00 am to 3:00 pm 
College of Lake County 

Physical Education Center-Gymnasium 
19351 Washington, Grayslake 



COME SEE!! 



Alex Rothacker from 

TOPS dog mining kennels 

and Olive Oyl t a Russian 

Wolfhound who Is In (he 

Gulnnett Book of World' 

Records -Two Times!! 

Come meet them 

and see their show! 



DONATE BLOOD 

At UkiUnd PuWishtrV ind Cotltgi of 

Uki County 'i Blood Drivt 

In conjunction with 

• UFHSOUHCE Blood SaHcti . 

Wttn fwx (ftt iJtwd yw pn cuethtt k» iMfey 

ancthtr annArrrivjr, antlhtr tkf o\ tht btccl\ 

onothcr rs'fh i \evht tht i Un. onuthu tali «ish 

a fiknd. anvihti bufh, mlhtt hut anai/xr 

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Sponsored bf 
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• Exhibitors • Demonstrations 

• Audience Participation • 

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'Eflhelanifj 



February 12, 1999 



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1998 S70A 

Leather. Tr.ics, 
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selling price. . 526,555* 
1998 S70 GLT 

Leather, Oaiid Touring 
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selling price. . $29,035* 
1998 S70 T5A 

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ms'RP. $MM® 

selling price$2 l >,2')0 f 



1998 S70 GLT-New 

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selling price.. $30,980* 
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b to (Ihuox: 
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selling price. . 532,960* 

1998 V70 AWD 
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D 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



February 12, 1999 



€»•# 



Jx^. 



The Auto Show Is 

And Everything Is On 

McHenry County's Official Auto Show Site 

0.9% APR Financing 



i\ 




Starts 
Friday 
at 9am 

r 



CONVERSION 
VRHS 



CHEVROLET 


gCKEVYTBOBSg 


IMPMMt 




SUBARU 



PONTIAC 



Ends 
Monday 
at 9pm 



.\ 



I 



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louMnulOJSED 



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tides to Choose 

SERVICE USED 



CHEVROLET 



ir 



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New "99 Chevy Cavalier Coupe 

SltcfCOOlM, 




11395 



me. MOO .. 

Qf»d R*Mlf 



Full Factory Equipment 

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New '99 Chevy Blazer LS 4X4 4-Door £ 

I li 0<»nd N«w 
Hot • Prtjji 




MUorift 
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ran ""•twawfir*-* 

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lna.tmGaaM* 

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New '99 Chev y Silvera do Pick-Up S^ffi*frQfS 

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approximate 





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5000 V-8-EngIne,jAuftomatic, 

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New '99 Fontiac Grand Am 

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New*99 Pontiac Bonneville 

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Inc. S400 Colltot 
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1996 Pbnllic Grand Am SE 



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1996 Cbevy Corsica 

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89 Mereuiy Topai.._..„...„„ „*1 ,990 

91 Chevy Cavalier. £.*1 ,990 

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92 Fort Escort- „ ..- S 2,990 



3 Fo?d Taurus......*.., '4,990 97 Chevy Cavalier. „.. , 8,990 97 Pontiac Trans Am 22K M11m„ m „...*1 5,990 96 Cadillac DBVUte.... 

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' 94 Pontiac Grand Prix *9,990 p r " 

97 Chevy Lumlna...... .,-.„. 10,99QL 

$ 8,990 



92 Chevy Caprice. 
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■'■1 



Used Cars 



Pre-Driven Cadillacs! Trucks, 4x4, & Vans 



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ANJIOCHJfL 60002 



Lakeland 
Newspapers 

February 12, 
1999 



Section 




Back on the streets 



A total of 77 Lake County offenders 
will be eligible for reduced sentences 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

Gary Michael Reedy made news 
In 1994 when he shot his wife three 
times after an argument in Round 
Lake Beach over an alleged affair she 
had. 

Now, five years later, Reedy's case 
Is making news again, but In a differ- . 
entway. 

The bizarre case became the ba- 
sis for an appeal, which was respon- 
sible for helping overturn the state's 
Truth-in. Sentencing law for cases 
tried between Aug. 28, 1995 and June 
18, 1998. 

As a result of the Illinois Supreme 
Court decision last month, many vio- 
lent offenders, including Reedy, will 
be eligible to get out earlier than was 
intended under the Truth-In-Sen- 
tencing guidelines. 

Waukegan attorney > Charles 
Smith had filed the appeal on behalf 
of Reedy. (During the prosecution, it . 
was determined Reedy was actually 
Scottie Joe Parker, who had escaped 
from a North Carolina prison farm in 
the 1980s. Parker had changed his 
name to Reedy, remarried and lived 
quietly in Round Lake Beach before 
shooting his wife in 1994). 

Under the Truth-in-Sentencing 
, AcURcody.would have been required 

to serve 85 percent or 12 years of his 
15-year-prison term. 1 Now, he will be- 
eligible for parole after serving only 
50 percent of his sentence or after 7 
1/2 years. He began serving his term 
in 1996 so he could get out in the year 
2003. 



THIS 
WEEK 



■ 




■ The challenge of the law was 
based on the fact that the Truth-in- 
Sentenclng Act was attached to an- 
other bill. The court declared that to 
be unconstitutional. 

"I'm glad the law was changed, 
not only because It benefits my 
clients, but also because these 
mandatory sentences are too severe," 
said Smith. 

However, law enforcement offi- 

'Certainlyitdisturbsthe 
law enforcement commu- 
nity. It should concern the 

public as well because 

these aw serious criminals 

we're talking about' 

GaryDelRe 
Lake County Sheriff 



cials are disappointed the Truth-in- 
Sentencing Act was overturned be-, 
cause It will resultin many violent of- 
fenders being released early. 

Lake County State's Attorney 
Michael Waller said Truth-in-Sen- 
tencing requires individuals convict- 
ed of certain violent crimes and sex 
'. offenses to seryeatletist 85 percentof, 
,,thelr a^ri ten ces find j murderers Ato . 
serve 100 percent. 

As a result of the Supreme Court 
decision, those offenders will receive 
day-for-day good time, which will 
mean they could be eligible forparole 
after serving only half of their sen- 
tences. 

"I think everybody In-law en- 
forcement is disappointed. It's a large 
number of offenders and a large 
number of these defendants were 
convicted of violent and serious 



crimes. Those people will serve less 
time than It was Intended they serve," 
Waller said. 

Nic Howell, a spokesman for the 
Illinois. Department of Corrections, 
said in Lake County alone 77 crimi- 
nals will be eligible for early release. 

"Lake County has 77 people af- 
fected by this change in the law, 
which Is the second most next to 
Cook County," he said. 

Still, Howell said the public 
should not panic that the floodgates 
of the prison walls will be opening 
and murderers and other violent 
criminals will be set free immediate- 

iy. 

He said many of the offenders 
have significantiy long sentences left 
to serve: "It's going to have an effect, 
but some of these guys still have long, 
long sentences." 

The court decision also will not 
affect those individuals who were 
sentenced under a newer version of 
the Truth-In-Sentencing law, which 
was adopted after Aug. 18, 1998. Vio- 
lent pffenders sentenced after that 
time will have to serve at least 85 per- 
cent of their sentences and murder- 
ers 100 percent. 

Lake County Sheriff Gary Del Re 
reiterated that there won'.Lbe "one 
major release of inmatesTTt won't just 
be a floodgate." 

Even so, Del Re said he Is working 
closely with State's Attorney Waller's 
office to see what action, If any, can 
be token so that certain violent of- 
fenders are n't , s et free : too early. He 
'•said mey are rescanning" \vhether 
some of the affected cases can be re- 
manded for new trial and resentenc- 
ing/ 

"I guess what concerns me the 
most is that these are violent crimi- 
nals so I hopesome type of corrective 
action can be taken," said Del Re. 

"Certainly, It disturbs the law en- 
forcement community," he said. "It 
should concern the public as well be- 
cause these are serious criminals 
we're talking about" 




LSD: A nightmare 

Police officer tells CLG crowd 
about dangers of Hallucinogen 



THE GREAT 
OUTDOORS 

RV Show set to begin 
PLEASE SEE PAGE C7 

FOR YOUR 
SWEETHEART 

Check out the special 
Valentine's page 

PLEASE SEE PAGE 
C12 

" ""GET'iTdFF 
YOUR CHEST 

Llpservice offers 
your oratory forum 

PLEASE SEE PAGE CI 1 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 

City Editor 



Imagine living your worst night- 
mare — and you can't wake up. , 

. Imagine being locked inside a 
movie theater, which suddenly turns 
into a giant pinball machine and the 
game begins killing everybody 
around you. 

Imagine sitting In a chair and 
desperately needing to go to the 
bathroom, but every time you try to 
get up to go, you end up back in the 
chair. 

Imagine seeing horrible mon- 
sters at every corner, and you don't 
dare turn on the lights for fear they 
might attack. 

No, this is not an episode of the 
Twilight Zone— it Is real. These are 
just a few of the nightmarish experi- 
ences by people who have had a bad 
trip on LSD. 

"Most people quit LSD because 

they had a bad trip," Officer Darren 

Baker of the Gurnee Police Depart- 

• ment told a crowd of about 80 people 

at the College of Lake County last 



Thursday. "They get locked inside a 
nightmare they can't get but of." 

Baker's presentation, entitled 
"LSD/Hallucinogens: Whatyou need 
to know," is the second in a series 
that has been held at the college on 
the dangers of drug abuse. Students, 
law enforcement and social service 
professionals, drug treatment coun- 
selors and members of the public at- 
tended the event. 

Baker, a 14-year law enforcement 
veteran, Is an instructor at CLC and 
for the Illinois Police Academy. As an 
integral part of the Metropolitan En- 
forcement Group, Baker has worked 
with agencies such as the DEA, FBI 
and BATE 

The former undercover officer, 
who also worked as a drug treatment 
counselor for a short time, recount- 
ed many tragedies of people who had 
abused LSD. 

One incident he recalls was 
when he was working undercover in 
Lake Forest ajew years ago. A bright 
young man approached undercover 

Please seelSD/C2 



Author Linda Curtis signs copies of her book, "Aquatic Plants of 
Northern Illinois" while a guest at the 10th annual meeting of the 
Lake County Land Conservancy.— Photo by Kenneth Patchen 




, By KENNETH JWCHEN 
StatTRe^rter- ■■•', 




; : Land :,£6mervaiicy: of Lake 
Cdunty'fiQSted.thelrTenthVAnnual 
Meeting and elected new directors 
Thursday; Jan." 14 at the Lake Villa 
District Library. 

Elected to three-year terms were 
Tim Phelan; David Gene, and Jeff 
Koziel. Kevin DuPont was elected to 
fill the remaining year of a vacated 
term. 

President , Fran 
Metzger reported to 
the members that 

1998 had been an es- 
pecially productive 
year for the organiza- 
tion. She commended 
the membership for 
their stewardship of 
conservation holdings 
as well as the improve- 
ments to Pohickory 
House, a vacant, 
rentable home on the 
conservancy's largest 
holding. 

Metzger reported, 
"During 1999, the land 
conservancy will con- 
tinue with property 
negotiations and 
property management activities, 
pursue additional funding mecha- 
nisms, expand our community out- 
reach program, concentrate on our 
environmental education commit- 
ment, and strengthen community 
Involvement." 

"I challenge each of our mem- 
bers to add at least one hew mem- 
ber, family, or organization to the 

1999 membership roll of the Land 
Conservancy of Lake County," she 
said. 

Chairman of the Land Commit- 
tee Jeffrey Koziel reported on prop- 
erty .improvements to Pohickory School If they do not already poss- 




"Aquatic 
Northern 



Unda Curtis 



well aa-s 6 me p] ahjiriL 

ings. • 

Author .Linda Curtis spoke : 
about aquatic plants in Lake Coun- 
ty with specific details ofherstudies 
in Cedar Lake. Curtis teaches at Col- 
lege of Lake County. She Is a steward 
of a bog in Cedar Lake. 

"I discovered a rare plant," she 

told conservancy members. It was 

last reported to be in Cedar Lake In 

1887., She found it 

again in 1988. 

One of the criti- 
cal turning points," 
motivating her to 
write a book, was an 
herbicide applicators 
conference she at- 
tended. The confer- 
ence was for people 
who apply chemicals 
to lakes to clear them 
of weeds. 

"The applicators 

did not. know the 

plants," she said. As a 

result,, she set- forth 

to create her book so 

people would know 

the types, functions, 

and names of plants 

in their lakes. 

"The ponds need plants,", she 

said. "If you don't have any plants, 

you have a bathtub." ■ 

■ Her program included slides of 
lake plant species. 

Copies of her book are available 
by mail for $15 atThird Productions, 
P.O. Box 731, Lake Villa, 60046. She 
autographed copies for members at 
the meeting. 

Dean Larson received a copy of 
"Aquatic Plants of Northeastern 
Illinois" by Linda Curtis as a door- 
prize. He said that he woulddo- 
nate the book to Ubertyville High 



Plants 
Illinois" 



House. In addition, he said that the 

committee members are discussing 

additional property acquisitions for 

1999. 

1 , Koziel explained that brush 

clearing is needed at Pohickory as 



es a copy. 

President; Metzger announced 
the availability of a new member-, 
ship brochure. Copies are available 
from the conservancy at P.O. Box 
293, Lake Villa, 60046. 



BACK TO BUSINESS M THE ORAL OFFICE / C5 



• ■ 




, \ I > ' 
>. I \ 1 ' 



C2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 12, 1999 



Clerk gets compkinkof 
solicitation of voter 




By JOHN ROSZKOWSKi 
City Editor 



The Lake County Clerk's office 
has received a report of an illegal 
commercial solicitation of computer 
voter registration lists. 

According to County Clerk 
Willard Helander, the commercial 
use of electronic voter files Is stricdy 
prohibited by state law. 

Helander said the Clerk's Office 
received a report from a candidate 
running for a local village board of 
someone making a commercial solic- 
itation to sell computer disks with 
names of Lake County's registered 
voters. 

"We've had one report, but the 
State Board (of Elections) said it has 
happened in in previous years," He- 
lander said. 

Only bona fide campaign com- 
mittees with campaign disclosure 
records on file with the State Board of 
Elections and the local county clerk 
may purchase diskettes of registered 
voters from a County Clerk or the 
State Board of Elections. 

At the time they obtain the 
list, campaign committees must 



complete and sign a written 
agreement not to make the infor- 
mation available for commercial 
purposes. 

"When you do this, you sign a pe- 
tition saying you're going to use it 
only for specific campaign purpos- 
es," Helander said. 

"You can't use it for any com- 
mercial purpose," he added. "It's 
just restricted to the purpose the 
campaign committee was 
formed." 

Helander said any candidate 
who's contacted to purchase elec- 
tronic voter files should ask the caller 
for their name, business address and 
telephone number. 

If this information is refused, 
contact the telephone company to 
immediately trace the call, or if 
your have caller ID, immediately 
contact the County Clerk's offfice 
at 360-5928 or the State Board of 
Elections at 217-782-4141 and re- 
port the number. 

"We're on the lookout. We just 
want to make sure if anyone else gets 
a call (to offer to sell voter registration 
disks), it's not something they should 
accept," she said. 



CROSSWORD 



1 


2 


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ACROSS 

1 . Begin 

6. Home-grown 

10. Kansas city 

11. Parlance 

1 2. Monastery 

13. Selling 

14. Bordered 

15. Impatiently 
18.. Atomizers 
21. Subordinate 
25. Temporary 
28. Type of nut 

32. Footrest 

33. Extremely exciting 

34. Ancient Celtic tribe 

35. Scandinavian nation 

36. Compelled 

37.' Radon and Xenon 



DOWN 

1 . Pivots 

2. Ebbs and flows 

3. Scoring in one shot 

4. Island 

5.3TiyIy 

6. Moved slowly 

7. Jangle 

8. Work hard 

9. Flirtatiously 

16. Self 

17. Mauna , Hawaiian vol- 
cano 

19. Disparage 
20: Playing card 

22. Raising one's spirit 

23. Careiakers 

24. Acted 

25. Watery discharge 

26. Train 

27. Monetary unit of Saudi Arabia 

29. Warm beverage 

30. Hebrew units of measure 

31. Roam 



ANSWERS 



DOWN 



ACROSS 



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MARRIAGE LICENSES 



Dec. 7-11 

Crccenciano Abrego and Eu- 
femla Ml teles of Mundclcin; David 
Bolton and Sabrina Day of Antioch; 
Darrin Lcith and Claudia Marin of 
Gurnce; Saverlo Raspa of Stlckncy 
and Judith Maddox of Vernon Hills; 
Rosendo Soto, Round Lake and Delia 
Morales of Mundelein; Carl Gibson 
and Amy Alsperger of Round Lake 
Beach. 

Robert McVkker and Nancy Al- 
brecht of Vernon Mills; Robert Sick- 
les and Sherd Goforth of Grayslake; 
Vincent Abate and Suzanne Casey of 
Vernon Hills; Ronald Allen and Deb- 
orah- Ruddock of Round Lake; 
Ronald Romanskl and Sara Skola of 
Fox Lake; Brian Salm and Michelle 
Sapp of Vernon Hills; Theodore 
Heng Leung and Susan Ellerman of 
Park City. 

Dec. 14-18 



Stevan Cooper and Miranda 
Flood of Gurnec; Dennis Thul II of 
Gurnee and Paula Kurck of Round 
Lake Beach; Torrance Appel and 
Karen Appel of Lake Villa; Michael 
Brown and Elizabeth Senlse both of 
Mundelein; Lconel Osorio of Round 
Lake Heights and Elvira Munoz of 
Round Lake Beach. 

Maurice Ellison Jr. of Bell wood 
and Lilla Manzon of Mundelein; 
Martin Chtopck Jr. and RuthAnn 
Chapman, both of Round Lake Park; 
Rory Fulmer of Ft. Banning, Ga. and 
Heidi Moore of Round Lake; Brian 
Lorenz and Lynn Plutz-Bohn, both 
of Antioch. 

Jan. 1-14 

...Lorenzo Munoz and Melissa 
Alexander, both of Lake Zurich; 
Jaroslaw Domin and Jungjoo Kim, 
both of Grayslake; Jeffrey Lardy and 
Vcnessa D anna Wilson, both of 



Wauconda; Jesse Varcla of Morenci, 
Ariz, and Tina Wordcn of Park City; 
Geratd ZdanowJcz and Bonlta 
Geldenhuys, both of Grayslake; 
Richard Allen and Cynthia Pugesek, 
both of Round Lake. 

Jan. 18-22 

Brad Gruss and Rockcle Mack, 
both of Wildwood; Nicholas Nlkitow 
Jr and Melissa Nathan, both of Lake 
Villa; Raymond Edwards and Eliza- 
. bethAnn Gibson, both ,6f Antioch; 
Steven Janda of Grayslake and Kath- 
leen Thompson of Bloomingdale; 
Anthony Carlngola and Shelly 
Bonclmino, both of Ingleslde. 

Michael Ostergaard and Tracy 
Pritt, both of RoundLake Park; Don- 
ald Herbon and Kristy Tipton, both 
of Lake Villa; Kenneth Meckler and 
Melissa Cartwright, both of Round 
Lake Beach; Bradley Beucher and 
Carolyn Royse.both of Grayslake; 
David Kong and Yoon Choi, both of 
Mundelein. - 

Michael Lapinskas and Nan- 
cyAnn Zentner, both of Gurnee 



FROM PAGE CI 



LSD: Officer warns of drug use 



officers wanting to purchase LSD. A 
warrant was issued for the young 
man's arrest a short, time after, but 
he then disappeared. 

About three months later, the 
young man finally reemerged — but 
was not the same. 

"He went from being a smart, ar- 
ticulate, funny kid to being stupid by 
using LSD for three months. He had 
wanted to be a doctor. Now, he's a 
post," said Baker. 

When police asked the kid'why 
he finally decided to quit LSD, Baker 
said he told them: "I had to stop. 1 
thought it was melting my brain." 

In addition to being an under- 
cover officer, Baker also worked at a 
drug treatment clinic in Waukegan, 
where he helped people who had 
drug and alcohol problems. Some of 
the people he saw had abused LSD. 

People who are high on LSD 
have a totally different perception of 
reality than most people, according 
to Baker. They often see things that 
don't exist or feel like they have an 
out-of-body experience, he said. 

"There was a musician who used 
to love to play the piano, but when 
he was on LSD he didn't hear the 
notes, he saw them," Baker said. 

While not all LSD experiences 
are frightening, Baker said all LSD 
abusers fear the "bad trip," a fright- 
ening, nightmarish dream-like state. 
One woman he helped to treat re- 
called a bad trip where she went to 
the movie theater on LSD. According 
to the woman's account of her LSD 
experiencerthe movie theater turned 



into a giant pinball machine, and the 
game starting killing everyone seat- 
ed around her. 

And, when you're on a bad trip", 
it usually takes a long time to come, 
out of it. An ordinary LSD trip can 
last 10 to 12 hours, according to Bak- 
er. 

"Your table might float around in 
front of you, or it might turn into, a 
ugly monster! You just don't know 
what's going to happen and that's 
why it's dangerous," he said. 

In some cases, people have 
flashbacks of a bad trip, reliving the 
same horrible experience years lat- 
er. Even sadder, some people nev- 
er come out of their LSD haze. 
Baker said one lady came up to him 
after a meeting and told him her 
sister had a bad LSD experience 
and has been in a mental hospital 
for the last 15 years. She believes 
she is an orange. 

LSD is not the only hallucino- 
genic drug people need to be con- 
cerned about, according to Baker. 
Another very dangerous hallucino- . 
gen is PCP, which can make people 
violent and impervious to pain. At 
the end of his presentation, Baker 
showed a video about an actual Ok- 
lamona case of a man on a PCP trip, ■ 
who kilted a female police officer 
and the other officer had to shoot the 
man 10 times before finally killing 
him. 

One drug that many people may 
not think of as a hallucinogen is mar- 
ijuana. 

Baker said some people have the 



mistaken perception that marijuana 
as a relatively harmless drug, but that 
is not the case. Cannabis, he said, 
has "a high propensity for abuse" is 
"a gateway drug" to more dangerous 
drugs like LSD. 

Baker said suggestions that 
cannabis should be legalized are . 
ridiculous.. 

"You can't legalize it. It's so 
wrong even to think about legalizing 
it," he said. 

During his presentation, .Baker 
showed the audience a tableful of 
confiscated drug paraphernalia. He 
also lit a cannabis tab, which is used 
by police in training to detect- the 
smell of cannabis. 

Baker's presentation was the 
second in three part-series the Lake 
County InTouch program has of- 
fered at CLC on substance abuse. 
The first part of the series, which was 
held in December, dealt "with mari- 
juana. The final part will be held 
April 1 and will focus on metham- 
phetamines. 

Lori Baker, prevention special- 
ist for the Northern Illinois Council 
on Substance Abuse, said she was 
pleased by the turnout for the 
event. 

"I think it was very successful. 
We had 79 people attend. He gave 
phenomenal remarks. People really 
enjoyed his style, his knowledge was 
right at the top. Someone like Officer 
Baker has a lot to offer. Someone 
who has been out on the streets he 
sees, unfortunately, what the drug 
(LSD) does to people." 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/Aprll 20 
Several loved ones are being secretive 
about a family matter. Don't get angry 
or push them to tell you whaFs going 
on. Try to be patient. You'll learn the 
facts soon enough. The person whom 

Kou've been seeing wants to take a 
reak. While this upsets you, you know 
that it Is the best thing to do. Aquarius 
plays a key role. 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 
Don't be stubborn when It comes to a 
business meeting late in the week. Lis- 
ten to what others have to say. Some of 
them rrtake very valid points. Try to 
work out a compromise. A close friend 
Is having romantic problems. Offer your 
advice, because you've been in his or 
her place In the past. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 

A business associate reveals his or her 
true feelings for you. No matter how you 
feel, don't get Involved with him or her. 
It only will create problems at work. A 
loved one asks for your opinion about a 
family matter. Be honest — even if he 
or she won't want to hear what you 
have to say. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
You have a falling out with that special 
someone early In the week, Cancer, 
While you have every right to be angry 
and upset, don't make any drastic deci- 
sions. The two of you can work this out 
If you just listen to each other. An ac- 
quaintance asks to bonow money, 



l ...v ■ 






Don't do ill 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
Don't let a compliment from a co-worker 
go to your head, You certainly deserve 
the praise, but that doesn't mean that 
you don't have to work hard anymore. 
You must keep giving 100 percent. A 
loved one has good news. Help him or 
herto celebrate. Libra plays an Impor- 
tant rote. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 

Be honest when a good friend asks for 
your opinion about nis or her new rela- 
tionship. While he or she might not want 
to hear what you have to say, it still 
needs to be said. You meet an Interest- 
ing person while running errands. Make 
plans to see him or her again. This 
could be the onel 



Libra - Sept 23/Oct 23 
Don't let a minor setback get you down, 
Jbra. You still can reach your goal; you 
ust have to come up with another ap- 
proach. If you relax and clear your 
lead, you II think of the perfect plan. A 
oved one is concerned about you. 
Don't Ignore his or her questions. Talk 
reely , and tell him or her how you really 
are. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 

You have a lot to do this week, Scorpio, 
Stay focused on the tasks at hand, and 
don't let others distract you. If you work 
diligently, you can get everything done 
and have time to enjoy yourself at the 



n —Jill W 



end of the week. A friend of a friend 
asks a favor of you. Do what you can. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 

Don't take your personal problems to .* 
work with you. Your superiors are ex- 
pecting a lot from you this week. Don't 
disappoint them. A loved one lets you in 
on a family secret. Keep It to yourself. 
It's not your place to tell anyone, Leo . 
plays an Important role on Thursday. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

Stand your ground when It comes to a 
disagreement with an acquaintance, 
You know that you are right. Don't back 
down just to end the situation. Others 
will support you. A close friend wants to 
set you up on a blind date. Don't do it. 
While he or she means well, the date 
has too much potential to be disastrous. 

Aquarius -Jan 21 /Fob 18 
Don't get In over your head when trying 
to help a co-worker this week, Aquarius. 
While you want to assist this person, 
you have a lot of your own work to do. 
Don't make yourself look Incompetent . 
to make him or her look good. That 
special someone has a surprise for you. 
Enjoy Itl 

Pisces - Feb 1 9/March 20 
When you see something that you want 
this week, Pisces, go after it. No one 
else is going to help you get it, so take 
some action. A loved one needs to talk 
to you about a personal problem, Listen 
to him or her, and try to be supportive. 



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February 12, 1999 




COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers I Q3 



AT A GLANCE 

A DIGEST OFSTORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



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Survey favors two library system 

Ilbcrtyvllle— The results were favorable in a recent sur- 
vey to judge voter approval of the new downtown LIbertyville 
library proposal. 

Ashcraft Research, a firm retained by the Cook Memorial 
Library Board, recently gauged voter sentiment toward a plan 
which would create a downtown LIbertyville library of at least 
70,000 square feet accompanied by a Vemon Hills facility 
which would be no larger than 18,000 square feet In size. 
I Jf „The survey was part of several efforts by the library board 
to prepare for the April 13 referendum which will be asking 
the public for funds to create a new two-library system. 

Fifty-nine percent of those surveyed said they are "proba 
bly* or "definitely" in favor of construction of a new; larger 
downtown Libertyyilie library and a smaller branch site In 
Vemon Hills. 

Firefighters vote to form union 

LIbertyville— By a 12-5 vote Libertyville firefighters voted 
become unionized as the LIbertyville Professional Firefighters 
Association. 

The recent vote will not affect service,, because under Illi- 
nois labor relations law, village employees are not able to 
strike, said LIbertyville Village Administrator Kevin Bowens. 

Representatives of the fire department were happy with 
the current pay structure, facilities and treatment, but were* 
concerned aboutloslng those current benefits. 

There were also concerns about fairness of policies and 
scheduling. 

Bowens said the, village is happy with the service the fire- 
fighters provide andlie does not see the formation of a union 
changing that service. 
It will be several weeks before a contract will be negotiated. 

Tax referendum on village ballot 

Volo— The smallest village in Lake County is making head- 
lines, with its attempts to pass a property tax referendum, the 
first in the village's brief history. 

Volo voters will have the opportunity to tell village officials 
how they feel about future development at the April 13etection, 
■■- -Village officials want to impose a property tax of up to 43.75 ; 
cents per $100 equalized assessed valuation. Volo President 
BurneU Russell said that is the most the village can go for, but is- 
not the amount it intends to levy, should the referendum be ap- . 
proved. 

Ice fishing derby, festival 

Chain O' Lakes— A string ;of warm temperatures will not 
stop the 39th Annual Chain O' Lakes Ice Fishin* Derby and 
Winter Festival from taking place this weekend. 

The festival, sponsored by the Northern Illinois Conserva- 
' tion Club, is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 13 and 
14, at three sites on the Chain— McDermit's Resort on Chan- 
nel Lake, serving as festival and tournament headquarters, 
and two satellite sites, Pink Harrison's Resort on Pistakee 
Lake, and K & S. KempFs on Petite Lake. 

Auctions, raffles, and fishing contests are among the at- 
tractions. Food and refreshments are available at all loca- ■ 
tions. Tournament and festival hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 
13, and 7 '.am. to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 14. 

Water tank design approved 

Fox Lake— Trustees approved the design plans for con- 
struction of a new 250,000 gallon elevated water tower to be 
built next to an existing tower at Ernest Avenue. 

Construction will likely start March 20, and be completed 
on Oct. 30, giving the village a total of 750,000 gallons of water 
storage for usage and fire suppression purposes, said Keith 
Peterson, supervisor of water and sewer departments. 

The village will advertise for bids on the project on Feb. 12, 
and open all bids March 2. The old 60,000 gallon tank will be 
torn down once the new tank, standing at around 130 feet, is 
on-line. 

Fire causes minor damages 

Island Lake— A family is lucky to have escaped a Sunday 
morning fire in their home without any injury, after a ceiling 




Pump it up 

Gas prices went as low as 82 cents per gallon at this 
Clark station on Route 83 In Lake Villa Tuesday. The 
oil glut in the Middle East as well as new petroleum 
sources from around the globe have increased com- 
petitor! and lowered prices- on crude oil; — Photo, by 
Sandy Bressner 



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Improvements, from an expanded parking lot to new mer- 
chandise and mailing services Inside. 

The new post office is in the400 block of Orchard Street at 
the location of the old McDonald's Restaurant east' of the Pig- 
gly-WIggly Supermarket, 

"There are 27 customer parking spaces here," said Tom 
Prince, Antioch Postmaster. 

Aside from the parking space improvements, the new An- 
tioch Post Office will have one of the most up-to-date retail 
postal stores in the Chicago region. 

Park District Honors Churchill 

Ilndenhurst— Lindenhurst Park District board mem- 
bers conveyed an award to former Illinois District 62 Repre- 
sentative Robert Churchill. It is granted by the Illinois Associ- 
ation of Park Districts and the Illinois Park and Recreation As- 
j sociation. 

Churchill received the 1998 Community Service Award for 
outstanding support to the Ondenhurst Park District. The 
award acknowledges; in part, the financial support he helped 
to secure from the state of Illinois to create Millennium Park. 

"It's been a great honor, and we hope to see you around," 
said board president Harry Omartian as he presented the 
award. The award is given "... in recognition and apprecia- 
tion of outstanding contributions and unselfish devotion for 
the advancement of parks, recreation, and leisure in the com- 
munity and the State of Illinois." 



light fixture caused a minor damages, authorities said. 

Wauconda Fire Department responded to a structure fire at 
412 Rose Avenue at 2:16a.m. Feb. 7, with the first arriving fire- 
fighters finding smoke blowing out a second story window. 
Crackling noise from the fire awoke one of the occupants, who 
awoke her husband, who unsuccessfully attempted to extin- 
guish the fire, authorities said. 

The fire caused $2,500 in damages. The home had one 
smoke detector in the basement, which never went off, author- 
ities said. Firefighters recommend having smoke detectors on 
each level of astructure, and outside every sleeping area. 

Students to choose new mascot 

Wauconda— The Wauconda Wildcats may be history by 
June, as Wauconda Grade School is set to have students vote on 
a new mascot. 

Fourth and fifth graders at Wauconda Grade School and 
Cotton Creek School will be asked to choose a new mascot and 
school colors for the new fifth and sixth grade school they will 
attend, starting this fall, when Wauconda Unit District 118 re- 
organizes its grade building configurations to accommodate 
student growth. 

A staff and parent committee will choose finalists from 
which the students will vote. 

Unique post office expands services 

Antioch— Antioch residents can use the new post office 
building starting Tuesday, Feb. 16. 

Official Grand Opening ceremonies will be hosted later by 
U.S. Postal Service officials in early spring. 

The Antioch Post Office will feature many customer service 



Fishing derby benefits lake 

Lake Villa— Deep Lake Improvement Association will 
sponsor their Bth Annual Ground Hog Fishing Derby Sunday, 
Feb. 2 1 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

The derby includes raffles for cash, hourly door prizes, 
and food. Weigh-in and raffle drawings will be at 3 p.m. Entry 
donation is $5. 

There are tagged fishing swimming in the lake for special 
awards. "There are $2,000 in cash prizes for tagged fish," said 
Penny MacKenzie, secretary for the association. 

"We usually give out two prizes an hour in the door prize 
raffle," she said. 

The cash raffle has a $500 first prize and a $250 second 
prize. 1 Thethlrd prize is $100. Winners four and five each re- 
ceive $50, and winners six arid seven receive S25. 
They all had a good time, the/.ve told us." 
Participants can drive on Grand Avenue to Deep Lake 
Road in Lake VWaTownship, go north on Deep Lake Road to 
Sixth Avenue, then west one block' to the derby site. 



Former Bear chooses Chiefs 

Grayslake — For many teams and players this has been the 
year for change. 

For Grayslake resident James Parrish, offensive tackle for 
the Chicago Bears, the winds of change has arrived. Last week, 
Parrish decided to sign a two year contract with the Kansas City 
Chiefs, calling an end to his brief retirement. 

"I am exicted." Parrish said.- "They're a good team and 
hopefully I am the piece of the puzzel." 

Parrish, with his wife Jennifer, have decided to stay in the 
Grayslake area for the time being. 

The 6-5, 300-pound offensive lineman, who won Super-" 
bowl ring with the Dallas Cowboys, Is returning to football fol- ' 
lowing a brief retirement. 

Teacher named Golden Apple finalist 

Mundeleln— A teacher at Fremont Middle School has re- 
cently been chosen as a Golden Apple Award finalist. 

Patricia Roszkowski, a sixth-grade science teacher at Fre- 
mont Middle School, has been selected as one of the acade- 
my's 31 finalists. She has been a teacher for 19 years, and is in 
her sixthyear of teaching at Fremont. Roszkowski was nomi- 
nated for the award by a person who chose to remain anony- 
mous. 

"I was overwhelmed," Roszkowski said. "It's a validation of 

who 1 am and what 1 do." 

The selection of the 10 Golden Apple Award recipients will 
be made by March 1. The winners will be honored in May 
during a one-hour television show on Channel 1 1 fWTTW). 



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-,.-,; £([($ - 



Pick up a 




Everything at this expo is 

sold for charity. 
— Lakelffe ; 




1 1 editions in coming weeks 



FOREFRONTS 

Lakeland profiles 10 of /the most 

interesting people In Lake County in this 

annual special Issue 




ART ON THE MOVE 

Lbcai artist creates 
works of art while riding ' 
commuter trains 
—lakflltfe 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



February 12, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Presldent/C.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslokc, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edit@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

Great Lakes inimune 
to new closing strategy 

Military reformists in the Clinton administration and 
high level Democratic strategists have launched a 
new round of military base closings, a process all 
too familiar to residents of Lake County where 
Great Lakes Naval Training Center regularly was buffeted in 
the long-standing debate over downsizing the U.S. military. 

An unprecedented bi-partisan counter attack supported by 
extraordinary effort in the Lake County civilian community . 
five years ago saved Great Lakes from extinction. The out- 
come left Great Lakes standing alone as the'Navy's basic train- 
ing installation, an assignment that assures its viability well 
into the next century. 

In this round, Scott Air Force Base near St. Louis and the 
historic Rock Island Arsenal are being targeted for closing. 
Lost in previous rounds were Ft. Sheridan, Chanute Air Force 
Base, Glenview Naval Air Station and Joliet Arsenal. 

Defense Secretary William Cohen chose Illinois to describe 
the administration strategy of closing more bases to free up 
funding for improving pay and military quality of life and to 
buy new weapons. 

No matter how the expected battle over base closings plays 
out, Great Lakes is sure to benefit from decisions to keep the 
U.S. military strong. America's Naval fleet is short 22,000 posi- 
tions. Great Lakes building is proceeding at a brisk pace for 
new recruit housing and training support facilities. The train- 
ing assignment is geared for 60,000 recruits a year. All the ac- 
tivity at Great Lakes adds up to a strong underpinning for the 
Lake County economy. 

While President Clinton's coupling of plans for more mili- 
tary spending and additional base closings on the surface are 
fatuously incongruous, we're happy that Great Lakes Naval 
Training Center is beyond the reach of the long knives in 
Washington, D.C. 

Growth accord 

stems from voters 

need for accountability 

Developers and politicians sitting down to address is- 
sues caused by growth and development can only be 
a step in the right direction. 
While, it was clear from the dialogue exchanged be- 
tween the two groups at a recent breakfast forum, that they 
have very differing ideas, bringing those thoughts to the table 
can only be a positive step. 

It is time politicians stopped blaming developers for the lack 
of road improvements and other infrastructure problems in the 
hands of state politicians, and it's time developers stopped blam- 
ing politicians for the high-cost of land and the cost of programs, 
such as the Stormwater Management Commission, designed to 
make development better. 

It is the citizens of Lake County, whether they have lived 
here a month or a lifetime, who seek the homes that develop- 
ers build. And, it is the citizens of Lake County, who have 
" elected the politicians, who feel the rules goyerning develop- 
ment must be strengthened. 

Developers and politicians have no choice but to work to- 
gether to make Lake County a better place. Voters sent them 
that mandate last spring. . 

We applaud the efforts of Lake County native Mark 
Buschman, president of the Lake County Homebuilders, to 
help bring the groups together to begin discussions. 

We also salute the elected officials, who want to make sure 
development does a better job of paying its way and who 
want to ensure developers take care of Lake County's natural 
resources. 

Dialogue is no good without enforcement and account- 



Are;mbre rules' and.permitting procedures necessary for 
developers? Who knows? With the current lack of enforce- 
ment of existing rules, it is hard to judge; 

No one disagrees it is a cost issue. No one disagrees those 
cost are passed on to consumers and county residents. 

If Lake County is going to make progress both economi- 
cally and in the preservation of natural resources, it can only 
do so if these two groups learn to work together. 

They are' accountable to the residents of Lake County who 
exercise their judgment with their wallets and with their 
votes. 




VIEWPOINT 



Ring around collar 
exerts shudders 



Call it the "leap frog" strate- 
gy, an intriguing notion to 
deal with the continued 
outward migration from 
Chicago that is turning collar coun- 
ties such as Lake into sausage-like 
links of urban enclaves ringing the 
Windy City. 

Now being advanced is the con- 
cept of "supercollar," counties that 
lie beyond the collar sector that de- 
scribe the destination of Chicago 
and close-in suburban migrants 
seeking a new start and a new life. 

The "supercollar" includes coun- 
ties like Boone, which is adjacent to 
Rockford; DeKalb, where genera- 
tions of college students have 
sought a higher education "far. 
away" from home, Grundy, known 
for tall corn and tall farm boys, and 
Kankakee, normally viewed as a 
downstate stand-alone city, not an 
appendage of Chicago. 

Demographers see a strong trend 
where newcomers bypass tradition- 
al collar destinations for more dis- 
tant locales where the lure is abun- 
dant open space, less congestion, 
genuine "country" lifestyle and best 
.value in new home construction. 
Using Internal Revenue Service fig- 
ures, a Chicago newspaper recently 
documented how the outward 
movement has turned areas beyond 
the collar counties into "hot spots" 
for growth and development. 

What's happening, it appears, is 
that collar counties are being by- 
passed in increasing numbers. The 
IRS numbers showed Kendall Coun- 
ty with a strong plus (3.5 percent) for 
a gauge of people moving in and as 
compared to people moving out 
while a previous hot spot like Du- 
Page showed a small minus (0.3 
percent) and Lake showed a weak 
plus (0.6 percent). In raw numbers, 
Lake and DuPage still lead collar 
county population growth. Lake 
County is certain to surpass 600,000 
population in the 2000 census. 

Where the "leap frog" strategy 
would come into play would be the 
adoption of growth and develop- - 
ment policies to encourage bypass- 
ing of Lake County altogether for 
destinations like Kenosha and Wal- 
worth counties, Wis., and the "su- 
percollar." That already is happen-, 
ing, to some extent, with the push 
by environmentalists and slower 
growth advocates for stringent de- 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



velopment codes in Lake's new Uni- 
fied Development Ordinance that 
will tend to slow the proliferation of 
rooftops. 

Planners are intrigued by the 
transformation of Lake County from 
a bedroom community to a job cen- 
ter, a reality that brings in an entire- 
ly new set of dynamics. The Lake 
County job census compiled by 
state economists grew from 224,220 
in 1996 to 232,277 in 1997. This ■ 
compares to 306,220 Lake County 
residents employed as of October, 
1998. Obviously, a majority of Lake 
residents commute elsewhere to 
places of employment, but Lake's 
status as a place to earn a paycheck 
is well established. Another obvious 
fact; the politics of providing for 
jobs is much different than provid- 
ing for residential rooftops. 

An interesting political shift is oc- 
curring in the fascinating study of 
population movement. Building in- 
dustry leaders have indicated inter- 
est in the current development strat- 
egy of the Lake County Board major- 
ity under the banner of "smart 
growth." But municipal leaders who 
dictate about 90 percent of Lake 
County development haven't yet in- 
dicated whether they're looking at 
growth differently. 

Unless villages redefine growth, 
the "leap frog" strategy will be only a 
pipe dream while schools become 
more crowded and highways get 
more congested. 

Sitting out election 

Bill Park, a former elected official . 
and strong civic voice in south Lake 
County for many years, declined to 
run for the Long Grove village board 
in the April 13 election. Park startled 
friends and foes alike two years ago 



when he ran for a village seat at age 
89 "to make sure mere was competi- 
tion." Bill and his wife, Virginia, a 
historian and former columnist for 
Lakeland Newspapers, recently cele- 
brated thelrGOth we„dd{ng anntvei;.u, 
. sary. "We've lived in thc.sarne house,, 
since the day we were married," Vir- 
ginia remarked proudly. "Now we 
live a quiet life." No more politics. 

Commodore Suzi 

Suzi Reese admitted to being a bit 
teary-eyed as she turned over the 
gavel last week after completing a 
two-year term as commodore of the 
Inland Lake Yachting Assn., the old- 
est and largest fresh water sailing or- 
ganization in the world. "I couldn't 
help it. It was a wonderful experi- 
ence," remarked Reese, the first fe- 
male commodore of the 100-year- 
old association dedicated to advanc- 
ing scow sailing. 

Reese, who learned sailing at 
Lake County's Long Lake, is an ac- 
tive sailor. Her term in office took 
her to regattas from New York to Cal- 
ifornia and Minnesota to Florida. 
Like batding white cap waters and 
mast-bending winds, leading the 
mid-west based association "was a 
wild ride," Reese commented. v 

On the go 

Dr. Dan LaVista has settled nicely^ 
into his new job leading McHenry 
Community College into the new 
millenium. LaVista, former presi- 
dent of College of Lake County, has 
a persona] goal of stressing the 
"community" aspect of the school 
with an enrollment of 21,000'full, ,, r , P 
and partime students. 

LaVista has a standing invitation 
for civic and business groups to use 
college facilities for meetings. He 
relishes the opportunity to host stu- 
dent visits like grade schoolers get- 
ting acquainted with the college 
planetarium. He's been busy on the. 
luncheon circuit spreading the MCC 
record of accomplishment, much 
like he did when became to CLC in 
.the 1980s. 

Dan and his wife, Rosemary, for r ,, 
mer residents of Liber tyville, are 
comfortable In their new home at 
Turnberry Country Club, Crystal 
Lake. That address also gives Dan a 
running start achieving another per- 
sonal goal— breaking 80. 



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Februarys, 1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers I C5 









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PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS* COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 




Lake County board represen- 
tative Suzl Schmidt, (R- 
Lake Villa) is very positive 
about Uie immediate and 
long-term impacts of the retreat at 
Illinois State Beach Park. 

"It was wonderful," she said. : 
"Everybody was there for two days." 

"All 23 board members." 

A report will be issued toward 
the end of the month. Some of the 
top priorities of concern among the 
group were related to the University 
Center, preservation of the environ- 
ment, and preservation of the busi- 
ness climate. 

"Traffic was way up there," she 
said. 

"We do need to get this (infor- 
mation) out in our communities," 
she said. Schmidt thinks the ideas 
exchanged may help county and lo- 
cal governments talk with one an- 
other, possibly in another mutual re- 
treat, maybe, at some future time. . 

"We got a lot of stuff cleared out 
and vocalized," she said. 

Also, they wrote up some new 
rules for behaving among one an- 
other. "We're going to really try to be 
nice to one another," she said. 

In the later half of March, they 
will be getting together again with- 
out a set agenda and maybe just to 
have a good time. 

The times they are a changin'. 

Learn about police 

Zion council members have 
named one of their full -time police 
officers, Sgt. Syndy Nugent, to 
serve as coordinator of a hew educa- 
tion and information program, the 
Zion citizen Police Academy. This is 
an 11 week project where interested 
citizens get working knowledge of 
how the police department works. 

Another cop 

Village of Lakemoor is the latest 
area community to cash in on a fed- 
eral grant to expand its police de- 



I 




Schmidt: 'We go la 
lot cleared up and 
vocalized* 




Crane: Ready to 
hear constituent 
input. 



partment Chief Ted Braclce re- 
ported that the $69,892 grant will 
provide for the hiring of another full 
time officer for three years. The ad- . 
ditiohal officer will be the eighth full 
time person and bring to three the 
number of federally funded police 
officers in Lakemoor. 

Coming home 

Congressman Phil Crane (R- 

Illinois) will be in town Feb. 26 to 
update constituents in the 8th Dis- 
trict on his iri-person view of Clin- 
ton impeachment proceedings. 



Crane will speak at Concorde Ban- 
quets, Route 12, Deer Park. VenlLa 
McConnel, president of the 8th 
Congressional District Republican 
organization is taking reservations 
at 526-7851 for a 7 p.m. dinner. . 

Changing image 

Patrick Smythe, who challenged 
Round Lake Mayor Jim Lumb er of ' 
his seat two years ago, is back in the 
race, this time as a trustee candi- • 
date. 

Running on the New Voice slate, 
Smythe and his teammates Bish 
Krywko have said they will work to 
change Round Lake's undesirable 
image. 

They are also seeking a more 
open and responsive village govern- 
ment 

No mention of a name change . 
here, however, as was on the agenda 
in Round Lake Beach last year, when 
image became an issue. 

No contributions 

Gov. George Ryan has prohibit- 
ed state employees under his con- 
trol from soliciting contributions for 
his political fund. 

* He has also ordered all future con- 
tributions from state employees be ._ 
returned. 

He signed the order Feb. 1. He 
said he wants to avoid the appear- 
ance, of any wrong doing. 

The subject of state employee 
campaign contributions was hot in 
the 1 November election. 

Freshman job 

.State Representative Tim Os- 
mond (R-Antioch) will be working 
on the personnel & pension, labor 
Sc commerce, appropriations-pub- 
lic safety and constitutional officers 
committees. 

Osmond was also appointed as 
minority spokesman for the newly 
formed Prosecutorial Misconduct 
Committee, a subject Osmond be- 
lieves needs a deeper look. 



Back to 
in Ov; 

€hecr up, my frustrated fel- 
low Americans, in two 
years we'll have a new 
president. Republican 
and Democratic candidates for the 
job already are pondering the 
plunge and, If we're unlucky, Ross 
Perot may run again, too. / 

Those who voted for George H. 
Bush in 1988 when he defeated 
Michael Dukakis, and in 1992' 
when he lost to (If you'll pardon 
the expression) Bill Clinton, may 
be able to vote for George Bush 
again in the year 2000. 

Only this time it would be 
George W. Bush, the governor of 
Texas who comes across as a cool, 
capable chip off those two nice old 
blocks. George H. and Barbara. 

Several other Republicans also 
are among those who would like to 
turn the "Oral Office" back into the 
Oval Office, the most familiar one 
being formerVice President Dan 
Quayle, 52, still preppy after all 
these years. 

The current veep, Albert Gore, 
Is the early favorite to win the De- 
mocratic nomination but he has 
an interesting opponent, 6-foot-5 
former basketball star Bill Bradley 
of New Jersey, who quit the U.S. 
Senate after IB years because 
"neither political party speaks to 
people where they live their 
• lives." 

However true that may be, it • 
did not endear him to his fellow 
Democrats. One recent survey '% 
showed 52'percent of those polled 
favor Gore for the Democratic 
nomination in the year 2000 and 
only 7 percent at this point prefer 
Bradley. 

Bradley may face an uphill bat- 
tle but says, "I have never felt more 
right about a decision In my entire 
life." His popularity in the polls 
will improve. 

A Los Angeles Times poll Indi- 
cated that either George W. Bush 
or Elizabeth Dole would easily 
edge out Gore if the presidential 
election were held now. Gore's 





THE 
FARR 
ORN 

Jerry P fan 




baggage may include the fact he 
keeps calling himself Bill Clintons- 
friend. : - 

Whlch brings us to Hillary 
Clinton. There is speculation that , 
after she leaves the White House 
she may run for the U.S. Senate 
from either Illinois (where she was 
raised) or New York, where Sen. 
Daniel Moyriihan will be retiring. 
Geraldine Ferraro; former De- 
mocratic vice-presidential candi- 
date, offers this scenario: Hillary 
runs in Illinois in 2002 and beats 
incumbent Dick Durbin, and then 
in 2008 runs for the White House 
and wins! 

Well, I don't know how many 
people would want for president 
Hillary Clinton who, as Winston 
Churchill once said about Russia, 
has been "a riddle wrapped in a 
mystery Inside an enigma." But we 
might vote for her as best support- 
ing actress. 

. George W. Bush says he chats 
with his dad via "e-mail , back, and . 
"forth" and likes to point out that 
"my Uttle brother (Jeb) Is the gov- 
ernor of Bbrlda." 

He calls the current situation 
in Washington. "pre.tty_ugly ... no 
leadership. I think most people 
feel that way." 

Considering who's available, 
there could be some really cozy 
tickets in the upcoming presiden- 
tial campaign. The Republicans 
could have Bush and Bush 
(George W. and Jeb), or Dole and 
Dole (Elizabeth and Bob), while 
. the Democratic running mates 
could be Gore and Clinton (as in 
Hillary). 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Brooks Farm should have been put on hold 



C 



orrect me if I'm wrong, . 
but I seem to recall elect- 
ing a new county board 
with the goal of limiting, if 
not eliminating the continuous 
sprawl of excessive over develop- 
ment. 

The approval of the Brooks 
Farm development in Irigleside by 
the Lake County Planning and De- 
velopment Commission looks an 
awful lot like the bad old days of 
pro-developer business-as-usual. 
Although county board repre- 
sentatives Bonnie Thomson Carter 
and-Sandy Cole stood by their con- 
victions in opposing this plan, Al 
Westerman and Larry Leaiblad's 
approving nod are more than just a 
little bit disappointing. 

Of course, Pam Newton's ap- 
proval was no surprise, as she has 
been a marionette of developers 
for years. Mr. Leaiblad's rationale 
was that the developer, United 
Homes, met or exceeded existing 
zoning ordinances. Apparently the 
three of them therefore felt com- 
pelled to approve this construe- ;" 

tion. 

- This leaves numerous ques- 
tions and concerns about the' atti- 
tudes and approach to doing busi- 
ness by our new board. Firstly, the 
Unified Development Ordinance 
(UDO) Is supposed to be reviewed 



and revised (strengthened). The 
current UDO was intentionally 
made weak by the old guard to eas- 
ily enable developers to steamroll 
new projects through the county 
board in order to bulldoze Lake 
County. 

Secondly, Brooks Farm has 
been discussed and negotiated ; 
since 1995. Why must it be ap- 
proved now? 

Thirdly, Impact fees of $1,000 . 
per unit are still inadequate to sup- 
port schools, withtfio financing for 
roads. When impact fees are low, 
the balance is acquired via proper- 
ty taxes either by increased tax 
rates and/or inflated assessments. 

The key here is the UDO. The 
ordinance should first be improved 
"before" any further development 
projects are approved by any coun- 
ty commission, committee, or the 
board as a whole. 

Grandfathering the zoning or- 
dinances is not necessary nor re- 
quired. Brooks Farm and others 
should be delayed until the new 
UDO is intact. There is no rush to 
build another housing tract. There 
is already an enormous amount of 
existing homes for sale to meet '■ 
. buyer demand, including recently 
built homes for sale by their origi- 
nal owners, who are taking losses 
on the sales to compete with new 



construction. 

I fear that the new slow- 
growth, pro-environment board 
leadership is being influenced • 
from development forces, creating 
a potential rift in the new coali- 
tion-a rift I'm sure developers 
would dearly love to see. 

The voters demand and expect 
credible actions from our elected 

county board members. 

KirkGoltry 
Round Lake Beach 

Graham was 30 
years ahead off time 

In 1972, ET. "Mike" Graham 
made a motion for the Lake County 
Forest Preserve to bond $55 million 
for land acquisition. Even his politi- 
cal friends thought he had lost his 
good senses, and the motion failed. 
' v The board finally passed a $5 million 
bond referendum. 

Twenty seven years later, we all 
now realize Graham was right Can 
anyone imagine all the land we 
could have preserved, all the schools 
we wouldn't have had to build, all 
the roads we wouldn't need, etc.; if 
we had listened? We know we can't, 
or even want, to stop all growth, but 
the public must be In control, not 
the development Industry, which 
they have been since World War II, 
using the same tactics— to control 



candidates' campaign financing. 

Everyone, even right-thinking 
developers, should be pulling for the 
Libertyvilie Referendum to pass, for 
jt will set the tone for future Open 
Space issues for all of Lake County 
which willbeneflt everyone. 

On the Growth and Open Space 
Issues, Graham is 30 years ahead of 
his time; let's not make the same er- 
rors we made 27 years ago. 

Norm Geary 
Antioch 

Another Graham 
boondoggle 

Why would Libertyvilie Town- 
ship Taxpayers spend up to $76 mil- 
lion of their money on this referen- 
dum? 

The plan Is incomplete; indeci- 
sive, and non-effective. There are no 
land parcels designated inVemon 
Hills, Mundeleln or libertyvilie. 

There are no parcels of 50 con- 
tiguous acres to buy. Recreational -. 
space was identified as needed in 
our Township but no parcel found. 

The best deal to date is with a 
developer in Mettawa costing 
$186,500 per acre which includes a 
conservation easement— drive-by 2 
land, no trespassing. Who benefits? 

Youitownship tax bill will go 
down dramatically in 2002 guaranteed 
if you veto this referendum Feb. 23. 



this is an ill-timed, badly 
planned and costly referendum defi- 
nitely not in the best interest of the 
majority of resident taxpayers. 

• Exercise your right Veto this 
"bogus" referendum on Feb. 23. 

Lynne Af . Mo ran 

Senior township Trustee 

Libertyvilie 

Give the gift of life 

As the news ofWalter Payton's 
need for a liver transplant shocked 
the sporting world, it once again 
brings to attention the great rie?d 
for organ donations. 

The reason I am bringing this up 
is that due to the advances in medi- 
cine, more and more organ trans- 
plants are done every year. There- 
fore, the heed for organ donors has 
also increased. According to the . 
United Network for Organ Sharing 
(UNOS) as of March 4, 1998, 38,761 
people are waiting for kidneys, 9,937 
for livers, 349 for pancreas, 1,652 for -. 
. kidney-pancreas, 99 for intestines, 
. 3,969 for hearts, 256 for heart-lung 
and 2,744 for lungs. 

The demand far exceeds the 
supply.. There are a lot of people 
who wanted to donate their organs 
but because their family or doctor 
was not notified before their death, 
it was too late. 

Robert Stevens 
Hoffman Estates 



I . ■!■ 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 






COUNTY 






. ■ * * * *»■ 



X \ I \ » V * * * s \ 



y \ * \ i i 



February 12, 1999 



_ 



Lakeland Publishers, Inc. & College of Lake County 

'99 Health and 

Fair 

K A 




FREE ATTRACTION 



Face Painting • Blood Pressure 

Stress Relaxation Tapes 

Home Health Care Items 

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Arthritis Screenings • Diabetes Screenings 

Toothbrushes # And Much More! 



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DON'T MISS THIS ONE!!! 

Saturday, March 27, 1 999 
10:00 am to 3:00 pm 

College of Lake County 

Physical Education Center-Gymnasium 

1 935 I Washington, Grayslake 



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and Olive Oyl, a Russian 

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Come meet them 

and see their show! 






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DONATE BLOOD 

At Lakeland Publishers' and College of 

. Lake County's Blood Drive 

in conjunction with 

LIFESOURCE Blood Services 

When you give blood you give another birthday, 

another anniversary, another day at the beach, : 

another night under the stars, another talk with 

a- friend, another laugh, another hug, another 

chance, . CiVE BLOOD • GIVE UFEl 



•Exhibitors • Demonstrations 

• Audience Participation 

• Giveaways 

• Door Prizes 



Sponsored by: 
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MINDING 
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Don Taylor 



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■ 




Februmryl2, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers C7 




iows promise in treatmen 



■ 



(Last of a two-part series) 

Last week In the first part of 
this series we listed 10 im- 
portant traits of successful 
people. This week we'll add 
10 more. Please share them with 
your friends, family and associates. 

More powerful traits 

• Successful people are secure 
in themselves. They gain self-confi- 
d?nce by trying and failing, and 
then trying again and succeeding. 
They learn from each mistake and 
failure. They press on knowing that 
they are now better equipped to ac- 
complish their goals. 

• Successful people are quick to 
praise others. Will Rogers said, "Get 
someone else to blow your hom 
and the sound will carry twice as 
far." Successful people give credit 
when credit is due, and they are 
quick to praise others when praise is 
deserved. 

> Successful folks are competi- 
tive. No, you don't see them run- 
ning around the office giving high- 
fives to associates. They don't boast 
of their victories and they can lose 
with grace. But, they love to win 
ojhd will'vVbrk hard to do so. 

• Successful men and women 
build strong relationships. Business 
is too tough and careers are too 
short to go it alone,. You need 
friends. Make friends today and ■ 
reap the benefits tomorrow.. 

•Successful people avoid com- 
promise. A good compromise is a . 
poor solution. Compromise by def- 
inition is a situation in which two 
parties both give up something to 
reach common ground. A compro- 
mise is a lose-lose decision. Yes, I 
know this is how we get business 
done in government. But do you re- 
ally want to emulate our govern- 
ment's success in your personal life 
or business? I didn't think so. 

• Successful folks are non-con- 
formists. They are not afraid to be 
themselves even at the risk of being 
perceived as different somehow. 
Your success is.nbt tied to dying 
your hair pink, wearing sandals in 
the snow and eating warm water- 
melon rind. You have room to be 
yourself- to be different - without . 
becoming weird and radical. 

• Successful men and women 
are loyal. You are not loyal just be- 
cause you show up for work every 
day - that's self-interest. You are 
not loyal just because you do what 
your boss demands - that's job se- 
curity. Loyalty is a success trait 
based on mutual trust, expectations 
and goals. Loyal people are loyal in 
Doth directions - up and down. 

• Successful people are focused 
on improvement. Shakespeare 
wrote, "Happy are they that can 
hear their detractions and can put 
them to mending." Who you are to- 
day matters little compared to who 
you will become before this life is 
over. You do not get to choose your 
beginning, but you can choose your 
ending. 

• Successful folks know how to 
say no. There'are times when "no" 
is the only acceptable answer. W, 
Clement Stone, founder of Com- 
bined Insurance, found four causes 
of failure in his sales force; They 



P lease see TAYLOR IC8 



A recently completed Phase III 
study, PROACT II, suggests Abbott 
Laboratories' investigational clot- 
dissolving drug can lessen the neu- 
rological disability associated with 
stroke. Data presented today at the 
24th American Heart Association In- 
ternational Conference on Stroke, 
and Cerebral Circulation In 
Nashville, Tenn., show that 40 per- 
cent (n=121) of patients treated with 
r-ProUK (recombinant pro-uroki-, 
nase), a clot-dissolving drug, had 
slight or no neurological disability 90 
days after treatment, compared to 25 
percent (n=59_-of control patients. 
Abbott anticipates utilizing this data 
in supporting a New Drug Applica- 
tion in mid-1999. 

"By opening the treatment win- 
dow to six hours, r-ProUK offered 
hope for stroke patients In this 
study," said Anthony Furlan; MiD., 
medical director, cerebral vascular 
center, department of neurology, 
The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 



Cleveland, Ohio, "further develop- 
ment of r-ProUK may extend hope to 
other stroke sufferers." 

Stroke is the third leading cause 
of death In the United States, af- 
fecting approximately 600,000 peo- 
ple each year. There are two types 
of stroke: approximately 83 percent 
are ischemic stroke, caused by a 
blood clot in the brain, and 17per- 
cent are hemorrhagic, caused by 
the breakage of a blood vessel in the 
brain. 

PROACT II is the first random- 
ized, controlled study to show a sta- 
tistically significant treatment effect 
using a clot-dissolving agent up to six 
hours after onset of ischemic stroke 
symptoms. The primary endpoint" 
was percent of patients achieving a 
Modified Rankin score of < 2, mean- 
ing no symptoms to slight disability, 
at90daysoffollowup. The Modified 
Rankin Scale is an accepted measure 
of disability outcome for stroke sur- 
vivors. 




Angiography was used to con- 
firm ischemic stroke in the middle 
cerebral artery In the brain. There 
were 180 patients randomized to 
receive either r-Pro-UK plus intra- 
venous heparin or Intravenous he- 



cular/diabetes venture at Abbott. 

"Patients - experiencing" the 
symptoms of a stroke should seek 
immediate medical attention," said 
Furlan. "These acute (sudden) 
symptoms include weakness, numb- 



parin alone, within six hours" of ness or paralysis of the face, armor 

stroke symptom onset. r-ProUK leg; difficulty speaking or under- 

was administered intra-arterially by' standing' blurred vision; dizziness; 

guiding a catheter to. the site of the or intense headache." 

clot in the brain, where it was In- Abbott Laboratories is a global, 

jected. : For a majority of patients, , diversified health care company de- 



treatment was initiated after five 
hours. 

There was an increase risk of 
symptomatic intracranial bleeding 
with r-ProUK versus control— 10.2 



voted to die discovery, development, 
manufacture and marketing of phar- 
maceutical, diagnostic, nutritional 
and hospital products. The compa- 
ny employs 56,000 people and mar- 



percent versus 1.8 percent, respec- kets its products in more than J30 

lively within 36 hours. There was no countries. In 1 998, the company's 

statistically significant difference sales and net earnings were $12.5 bll- 

rates between treatment groups. lion and $2.3 billion, respectively, 

"We are encouraged by these re- with diluted earnings per share of 



suits particularly because there are 
limited options available'for people 
who suffer a stroke," said Bruce 
Wallin, M.D., head of the cardiovas- 



$1.51. Abbott's news releases and 
other information are available on 
the company's Web site at 
http:/ /www.abbott.com. 



RV, camping & van show begins Feb. 17t 



Some 25,000 people -. including 
recreation vehicle enthusiasts, out- 
doors fans and camping lovers - will 
attend the 31stAnnual RV, Camping 
& Van show at theRosembnt Con- 
ventioh Center Feb. 17-21 . 

The show will feature over 400 
new- 1999 vehicles on 71/1 acres of 
indoor display space under one roof. 
There will be something for every 
taste as luxurious motorhomes for 
cross-country treks, conversion vans 
for tailgaters and travel with friends, 
and pop-up campers for weekend- 
warrior outings in the woods. • 

Also, more than- 200 brands, 
manufacturers and companies will 
be represented, giving attendees up- 
close access to the brand new wares 
of local RV dealers and even a chance 
to learn about campgrounds and 
travel destinations. The RV, camping 
& Van Show in Rosemont will be one 
of the very first opportunities in the 
country to view 1999 models fresh 
from the factory, side-by-side. 

"You have to see the inside of 
these vehicles to believe them," said 
Keith Mistrik, the shows manager. 
"Not only are the motorhomes com- 
plete living-rooms-on-wheels, but 
there are also tremendous comforts 
and options available in the simpler 
truck campers and pop-up units. 
There's something here for every 
need and budget." 

The show opens on Feb. 17, from 
1-10 PM, and continues those hours 
on Feb. 18, and Feb. 19. Saturday, 
exhibits are open from 10 am to 10 
p.m. the show raps up Sunday from 
10 am to 5 p.m. Admission is $8 for 
adults, $2 for children aged 6-12 and 
free for children under 6 with an 
adult. Discount coupons are avail- 
able through the show's website 
www.thervshow.com. * 

Among the highlights are the 
many vehicles with "Slideouts," are- 
cent innovation that allows RVers to. 
expand the space inside theirRVsby 
as much as one- third once they park. 
At the touch of a bottom, a portion of 
a room inside the RV -and the ob,- ■ 
jects In it, such as a couch, table, bed 
or refrigerator - glide outward up to 
3 1/2 feet. Slideouts have been de- 
scribed as cubes with one open side 
that "nest" inside RVs. 

On the outside, extended slide- 
outs appear curious, as a box beyond 
the fixed wall of the RV, while inside, 




Today's RV interiors feature all the comforts of home including such amenities as oak cabinets, 
satellite television arid even work stations for home computers. The RV, camping and van show is 
expected to draw 25,000 people to Rosemont Horizon, Feb. 17-21.— Submitted photo 



they provide an amazing amount of 
additional floor space. Before slide- 
outs, many older RVs were, saddled 
with a central hallway layout; with 
slideouts, floor plans take on more of 
the true open design of a home. 
When the RV is in motion, the re- 



tracted slideout cube rest in the 
same positions they would in a non- 
slideout model. Some RVs have a 
single mechanisms through cycle 
testing up to 10,000 times. 

Twenty-nine RV dealers from 
throughout the six-county- Chicago 



area and Northern Illinois are dis- 
playing units and will have pricing for 
the show. Free seminars also are 
available, including a talk on traveling 
by RV in Alaska, which will be held at 
various times each day of the show. 



RV interiors have all the comforts of home 



Corian or marblecountertops. 
Fine hardwood cabinetry. A home 
entertainment system complete 
With a satellite dish. You could see 
these items in a real estate 
brochure or an ad for a home, but 
you might be surprised to find 
them in an RV. 

Today's RVs feature more 
creature comforts, amentities arid 
options than ever before, arid not 
just in the higher-end models, 

"Most of the interiors have be- 
come pretty similar in quality," 
said Bill Mirrielees, general man- 
ager of Chrysler Valley RV in Crys- 
tal Lake, III., and an exhibitor at 
the RV, Camping & Van Show run- 
ning Feb. 17-21. at the Rosemont 



Convention Center. 

Indeed, you can in smaller 
truck campers and pop-Up trail- 
ers. "The difference a buyer 
should look for are in the little 
things," Mirrielees said. 

"In cabinetry, for instance, 
look at the composition of the 
cabinets. Are they solid oak? How 
are. the comers done-are they 
even-cut and precise or are they 
ill-fitting? Can you find visible sta- 
ples?" 

Many manufactures offer dif- 
ferent patterns arid types of fabrics 
for furniture. "Make sure you get 
tough fabrics that will, hold up 
well," Mirrielees said. This is es- 
pecially true if you have children 



traveling along, as more and more 
RV enthusiasts do. "Ideally, you 
want something that will stand up 
to the same type of use it would 
get in your home," 

RVers are spending Increasing 
amounts of time living on the roaji 
(traveling an average * of 5,900 
miles annually and spending more 
than 23 days on the road), .so -the, 
comforts of home have tobe pre- 
sent. RVs up and down the spec- 
trum and price range now contain 
fully equipped kitchens and baths, 
queen-sized beds, washer arid 
dryers central heat and air condi- 
tioning, and even a way to in- 

. P/fcWScdNTERIORS IC8 



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■ C8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 12,1999 






REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

■ ■ • * • -v 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Antloch 



4221 1 6th St, Dianne F Pezzati & 

John Duckworth, $125,000 

508 First St, William & Irus Hutch- 

ings, $175,000 

704 Main St, Todd & Erin Van- . 

heirseelc, $125,500 

Fox Lake 

68 Lake Ln, Joel Saxe, $140,000 
503 Lincoln, Scott Rees&.Denice 
Ross, 5125,500 
7233 Oxford, June Duenn, $120,000 

Gravslake . 

560 Chard Ct, Eugenia M Grabows- 
ki, $91,500 

440 Cross Arm, Charles & Debra Jef- 
frey, $305,000 

802 Deep Woods Ct, Robert & Car- 
olyn Strahs, $241,000 
835 Easton Ct, Paul & Julie Reed, 
$144,000 

874 Essex Cir, Amy Bassing, 
$122,000 

1469 Fairport, Troy & Kimberly ' 
Wood, $168,000 

991 Highgate Ln, Sandeep R & Man- 
isha S Patel, $215,339 
996 Highgate Ln, Ronald A & 
Sharon LDamitz, $214,264 • 
634 Indian Path Rd, Joseph J & Cyd- 
neyMuti, $308,669 
77 Jamestown Ct, Gerald Jenrich; 
$375,000 

1387 London Ct, Peter D Petracik, 
$180,000 

18171 Meander Dr, Robert W& 
Carey D Fox, $267,000 
1082 Potomac Ct, John E Watters, 
$292,500 

1346 Prairie Trail, Thomas W & Pat- 
ty Bennett, $409,192 
24087 W Rt 60, Patricia A Bruno, 
$310,000 

18319 WSpringwood Dr, Bradley C 
Feldman, $230,440 
18283 W Springwood Ln, Gregory & 
Lisa A Hunt, $244,500 
177 1 1 W Stone Manor Dr, Berle & 
Patricia Ann Hopkins, $409,409 
350 Woodland Dr, Craig A Katzen- 
maier & Melissa A Cos tell o, 
$154,000 

Xiiun££ ! 

901 Abingdon, Jon T Davis, $67,000 

669 Beth Ct, Thomas P Burke, 

$97,500 

990 Blackburn St, Craig Sprovach & 

Denise Spovach, $209,000 

7640 Cascade Way, Steven B & 

Kristin J Trapp, $256,4 11 

7686 Cascade Way, Todd M & Lisa. 

MWoif, $337,639 

7702 Cascade Way, Garett R & Deb- 

byLGarofolo, $323,599 

690 Chandler #410, Veronica Mary 

Olson, $87,000 " 

17695 Dawn Ct, Joy & Stephen 

Wilkins, $202,000 

4465 Eastwood, Laura ETrujillo, 

$225,000 

900 Fuller, Donald & Karen D Sterly, 

$183,900 

338 Hawthorne, Yolanda & Peter 

Dickson, $153,000 

36561 N Douglas Terrace, William D 

&Dlxel Ray, $112,000 

36554 N Old Wood Tr, Nathan & 

Sandra Hyde, $368,750 

34498 Old Walnut Cir, David P 

Hogan, $204,160 

6732" Roanoake Ct, Chang & Mi Hee 

Yoo, $127,500 

4432 Robin Ct, Rudolph & Theresa 

Zeithammel, $130,314 

682 Rolling Green, Susan J Church 



Singer, $170,000 

36865 Rosedale, Octavio Cavazos, 

$159,900'. 

7017 S Stratton 0O2d, Jonathan J 

Carreira, $115,900 

6271 Sleepy Hollow Ln, Winston E & 

Mary C West, $195,000 

920 Vose Dr #501, Louis R & Louise 

Bruno, $119,000 

17682 W Dawn Ct, Richard A & 

Janet D Turner, $207,000 

34105 WhiteoakLn, Kay F Klemens, 

$121,000 

Hawthorn Woods 

145 Glen Rd, Eric C & Deborah A 

Holmblad, $295,000 

55 Parkview, Timothy Oleary, 

$490,000 

Ingleslde - 

25853 Brodie Dr, Bryan & Elaine 
Renkal, $115,500 
707 Crestview Dr, Shari Alaniz, 
$128,500 

26646 Elmwood, Donald Berglind, 
$107,500 

34690 N Lakeside Dr, Emelia M 
Koenemann, $144,460 
36797 Ridge Rd, Donald Thrun, 
$81,400 

26192 W Vista Ct, Brenda L Kay, 
$183,998 

26252 W Vista Ct, Joseph F & Patri- 
cia M Vavrina, $158,239 
26359 W Vista Ct, Patrick & Penny 
Cummings, $229,987 
36920 Waterside, Johnny & Shelly 
Jensen, $129,000 

Lake Villa 

35298 Drury Ln, Cambridge 

Homes, $239,200 

899 Harvard Ct, Adam & Emily Rud- 

man, $482,500 

150 Oakwood Ave, Donald & 

Pamela Peleska, $105,500 

21445 Sarah Dr, The Secretary Of 

Hud, $77,643 

24037 Saxony, James Hinnman, 

$235,000 

libertyviHe 

291 Crescent Knoll, James Dominik, 
$202,500 

1322 Downs Pky, Steven J Bonne, 
$175,000 

1213 Flamingo Pky, Susan C Van 
Den Hall, $140,000 
29805 Forest Lake Ln, Jeffrey M 
Winton, $493,241 
765 Garfield, Jane Ellen Vickerilla, 
$155,000 

1827 N Countryside, James J & 
Deanna R Willemsen, $255,000 
1601 Nathan Ln, Rapheal E & 
Raquel A Martinez, $389,391 
28601 Tanglewood Crt, Avrom & 
Kathleen M Roberts, $460,000 
1609 Virgina Ave, John J & Mary • 
Ellen Boyne, $323,500 
17169 W Cunningham Ct, The Na- 
tional Bank Trust Company, 
$165,641 

Undenhurst 

2305 Glendale Ct, David Padtlla & 
Angela Kramer, $122,000 
274 Jamine Cir, Brian O & Jennifer L 
Fuller, $161,560 

2510 Timber Ln, Thomas & Susan 
Derrick, $117,761 

539 Waterford Dr, Phillip B Thoma- 
. son & Karen LChisholm, $124,900 

Mundeleln 

821 Ambria, Todd & Kelly Bovvland, 

$275,000 

1233 Ballantrac, Christine Price & 

Paul Stephan, $90,000 

1657 Blackburn Dr, Marci Moss, 



$217 000 

11 12 Crystal, Jeffery & Bobbi J 
Rudolph, $192,000 
737 E Mckinley Ave, Tad A & Colleen 
T Dennis, $121,000 
825 E Orchard Rd, T Dale Johnson, 
$68,000 

1212 Huntington S, David N & Su- 
san B Kretchman, $125,000 
925 Raleigh Rd, Chad S & Karen S ' 
Pompilio, $159,000 
1205 Regent Dr, David M & Brenda J 
Henreckson, $140,000 
301 S Lake St, Terry Beller& - 
Meaghan Maccallum, $1 18,000 
205 S Lincoln Ave, Eric Lundquist & 
Kimberly Engman, $162,500 
31 S Windsor PI, Todd R Breitnefield 
& Karen A Breltenfield, $167,750 
19458 W Harvard, Leovardo & Fed- 
erico Hernandez, $137,000 
20220 W Indian Creek Rd, Paul . 
Davis, $460,000 

Round Lake 

603 Linden Dr, Philip V Poprawski, 

$79,000 

401 N Barnwood Ct, Vince & Enza 

Baratta, $168,681 

Round Lake Beach 

276 Claredon, Roberto Gil, $1 14,000 
354 E Stanton Ct, Meika C & Todd A 
Claerhout, $149,721 
386 E Stanton Ct, Curtis J & Thomas 
J Leach, $148,335 

525 Heather Ter, The Secretary Of 
Hud, $11 1,906 

1604 JunewayTerr, Charles N '& 
Janet M Roeske, $92,750 
2226 N Canterbury Ln, Christopher 
N & Krista A M Jackson, $175,625 
2300 N Canterbury Ln, Steven M 
Lipinski & Catherine L Ferguson, 
$200,110 

2301 N Silver Oaks Dr, Aurelio & Ce- 
celia Villa, $168,419 
2253 N Stonehedge Ct, Timothy C & 
Andreal Shales, $151,739 
1429 North Ave, The Secretary Of 
Hud, $123,091 

2377 Sunrise Dr, Jeffrey & Laura L 
Romig, $158,000 

Round Lake Park 

427 Greenwood, Frederick A Mon- 

temarano 8t Kevin C Mihalko, 

$96,000 

213 Kenwood, Samuel & Susan 

Meroni, $ 

Wadsworth • : •_ 

422 1 Gent Dr, Robert L & Kimberly 
Fisher, $228,000. 

2773 N Augusta Dr, Michael J Lam- 
bert &WendyJ Hurt, $117,100 
36780 Thoroughbred Dr, James E & 
Mary Pat Nickell, $465,000 
14610 Wadsworth, Robert R & 
Theresa Boersma, $210,000 

Wauconda 

1000 Brown St, Dennis Malinoski & 

Charles Schott, $112,000 

309 Brown St, Ronald O & Rosemary 

Gutman, $140,000 

512 Greenview, Jerrold Clemens, 

$240,000 

388 Hollow Hill Dr, David R & An- . 

gelaEHammerl, $310,000 . 

112 Hubbard Ct, Elizabeth G 

Lisafeld & John R Gross, $1 10,500 

1002 Monroe St, Kathy K Olson, 

$135,000 



It's almost time to start 
seedlings indoors 

Wi 
i 



Information provided by Record Informa- 
lion Scrx'ices, Inc. in St. Charles. The com' 
pany provides public record data for Lake, 
DuPage, Cook, Kane, Mclfenry, Kendall 
and Will counties including new incorpora- 
tions, business licenses, bankruptcies, fore- 
closures, judgments, mechanic liens, state 
and federal tax liens, residential and com- 
mercial real estate transfers, building per- 
_ mils, DUI arrests, divorce reports, sheriff 
sale foreclosures, (630) 365-6490, public- 
record.com. 



ittothe break in the 
weather, and the cal- 
endar going on the 
third week of Febru- 
ary, spring will be soon to follow. It 
will be sometime yet before we can 
go outdoors and turn over the gar- 
den, but it is time to get into action 
with seed propagation indoors. I 
like to start most of the vegetables, 
and many of the flowers I grow in 
my garden from seed. This allows 
you to grow many varieties that are 
not readily available in the nursery. 

I hope you have ordered your 
seeds from the catalogue compa- 
nies, but if not, you still have time to 
do so. Another advantage to starting 
seeds indoors is you can grow 
unique varieties at quite a savings in 
price. You can start an entire peren- 
nial flower bed for a fraction of what 
it would cost to buy potted plants. If 
they do not thrive in your garden, 
well you're not out a whole lot of 
bucks. This is a good way to be fru- 
gal. Also, if you do not want to mail 
order your seeds, you can purchase 
many varieties at your local garden- 
ing supply store. Go browse around 
and see if any attract your eye. 

With the break in the weather, 
and the calendar going on the third 
week of February, spring will be 
soon to follow. It will be sometime 
yet before we can go outdoors and 
turn over the garden, but it is time 
to get into action with seed propa- 
gation indoors. I like to start most of 
the vegetables, and many of the 
flowers I grow in my garden from 
seed. This allows you to grow many 
varieties that are not readily avail- > 
able in the nursery. 

1 hope you have ordered your 
seeds from the catalogue compa- 
nies, but if not, you still have time to 
do so. Another advantage to starting 
seeds indoors is you can grow 
unique varieties at quite a sayings in 
price. You can start an entire peren- 
nial flowerbed for a fraction of what 
it would cost to buy potted plants. If 
they do not thrive in your garden, 
well you are not out a whole lot of 
bucks. This is a good way to be fru- 
gal. Also, if you do not want to mail 
order your seeds, you can purchase 
many varieties at your local garden- 
ing supply store. Go browse around 
and see if any attract your eye. : 

If you have decided to delve into 
this seed starting project— here's 
how. By the way, this is a great pro- 
ject to get the kids (or grandkids) in- 
volved in. They love to see the 
whole process of starting a seed and 
watching it mature into a plant. I'm 
still amazed at what wonderful 
strong plants evolve from that tiny 
seed, especially when I am in the 




GARDEN 



LydiaHiiff 



garden harvesting the.tasty toma- 
toes. 

." There arc many type's of seed 
starting kits available commercially, 
such as Jiffy peat pellets, pat pots 
and fertl-cubes. The Jiffy peat pellets 
are handy peat pots and potting soil 
all in one. All you need to add Is wa- 
ter, and within minutes they expand 
three to five times. Once expanded, 
place your seed'in the small hole in 
the'top. Many of the top seed pro- 
ducers use Fertl-cubes. Each cube, is 
a blend of mosses, organic food and 
vcrmiculite. Cubes stay moist, ger- 
minate rapldlyand develop vigor- 
ous, healthy roots. Included with 
them are plastic flats with detailed 
instructions. If you do not want to 
purchase any of the above, you can 
mix your own potting medium. Use 
equal amounts of peatmoss, vermi- 
culite and perlite. Recycled plastic 
six packs that your seedlings came . 
in, work real well. I have used styro- 
foam egg.crates with much success. 

Most tomatoes and peppers 
should be started eight to 10 weeks 
before the predicted frost date, 
" which is May 31. 1 usually start them 
no later than the first week of 
March. Peppers and tomatoes need 
bottom h eat to germinate. Setting 
them by a heat source, the hot water 
heater, furnace, or heating vents 
works well. 

Flower seeds may need heat or. 
some just need light afldXQPXtSJEflS 
to germinate. Follow instructions on 
seed packets or the various seed cat- 
alogues can be very helpful. It is very 
important not to bury the seeds too 
deep, 1 use a toothpick and gently . 
push them down into the medium, 
then, when they need to be watered 
I use a spray bottie (a stream of wa- 
ter could damage the teeny 
seedling). It is also very important to 
never let the soil dry out completely. 
It also aids in germination, if they 
are covered with saran wrap or plas- 
tic bags until the seeds emerge, this 
helps create a green house effect.. 

If you have never started seeds 
• inside before, give it a shot. It will 
prove to he a worthwhile project. 

Until next time, peace. 

Garden questions may be sent to 
Garden Journal, do Lakeland News- 
papers, 30'S.WIiitney St., Grayslake, 
I L 60030. 



FROM PAGE C7 



TAYLOR: A list of 20 shortcuts 
to being a big success 



were: illicit sex, alcohol, deception 
and stealing. A drinker becomes a 
drunkard drink by drink. A liar de- 
generates lie by lie. We become 
successful "no by no" when it 
comes to improper sex, alcohol and 
drugs, lying and stealing. 

* Successful people neutralize 
negative feelings with action. They 
don't brood, feel sorry for them- 
selves or drown in their own pity. 
.Instead, they take positive action. 
What you do is more important 
than how you feel and what you 
say. Actions truly speaker louder 



than words. You don't get to 
choose the cards you are dealt in 
life, but you can decide how you 
play them. 

There you have my twenty 
shortcuts. Will you step on the es- 
calator of success? Or, are you con- 
tent to toil slowly up the stairs. The 
choice is yours. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of Up 
Against the Wal-Marts, You can 
reach him at Minding Your Own 
Business, POBox 67, Amarillo, TX 
79105. 



INTERIORS:Today's RVs 

havehome comfort 



crease living space at the press of 
a button. 

This "instant room addition," 
known as a slideout, can expand 
inside a parked RV by as much as 
one-third. When the slideout is 
activated, a portion of. a room in- 
side the RV - and the objects In it, 
such as a couch, table, bed or re- 
frigerator - glide outward up to 
31/2 feet. Slideouts have been de- 
scribed as cubes with one open 
side that "nest" inside RVs. 

On the outside, extended 
slideouts appear curious, as a box 



Biel named executive director 

Mark Biel of Springfield, has Illinois (CiCI). 
been named Executive Director of Executive Director Biel will be re- 

the Chemical Industry Council of sponsible for all aspects of the associ- 
ation's management and direction. 

For the past sue years, Biel served 
as CICI's Director of Government Af- 
fairs. 

Biel, formerly of Antloch, is the 
son of Aileen and Paul Biel of Anti- 
och. 

Bic) resides in Springfield with his 

wife Debra, and daughter Samantha. 

■ Currently, CICI represents 170 

chemical companies in Illinois which 

employ over 62,000 people. 



protruding beyond the fixed wall 
of the RV, while inside, they pro- 
vide ajrt amazing amount of addi- 
tional floor space. Before slide- 
outs, many older RVs were sad- 
dled with a central hallway layout' 
with slideouts, floor plans take on 
more of the true design of a home. 
When the RV is in motion, the 
retracted slideouts rest complete- 
ly inside. the vehicles body. The 
furniture or appliances in the 
s|ldeout cube rest In the same po- 
sitions they would in a non-slide- 
out model. 



Please Send Community Calendar 
Information To: 

LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPERS 

c/oCRISTINAFEINDT 

30 S. WHITNEY ST. 

GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

Phone 223-8161 



*J* 



I*: ■ 



■ 



i 



February 12, 1999 





Lakeland Newspapers I C 




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DEATH NOTICES 



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Charles D. BIythej age 65 of Gumee 

An: Strang Funeral Chapel' and 

Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake 

ROSE 

Zelda M. Rose, age 99 of Libertyville . 

Arn McMurrough Funeral Chapel Ltd., 

Libertyville 

VICKERS 

Margaret H. Vlckers, age 55 of Gurnee 
Arr: ' McMurrough Chapel Ltd., 
Libertyville 



SMIDDY 

Kermit M. Smtddy, age 83 of Barrington 
Arr Stirlen-Pieper & Davenport Funeral 
Home, Barrington 

RIEKE 

Margaret Rieke, age 86 of Barrington 
Arr: Miller Funeral Home, West Dundee, 

BORCHARDT 

Ruth Martinec Borchardt, age 81 of 

McHenry 

Arr George R. Justen and Son Funeral 

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Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(847)587-2100 
™*i 'Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

; 122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

.Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 orToll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPELAND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 
(847)223-8122 
' David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



Henning D. Frandsen 

•Age 79 of Wichita, Kan. (formerly resided In Grayslake) 
died Feb. 2, 1999 after a lengthy illness. He was bom July 24, 
1919 in South Dakota, moving to Grayslake area in 193B. He 
was part owner with his brother, Niels of Frandsen Tbol and 
Die of Grayslake for many years, also former owner of 
Renwood Country Club, member of Masonic Lodge 115, past 
president of Lions and Exchange Clubs, 

He Is survived by his wife, Thelma and son, Peter; two 
sisters, Marion Blair of California and {Catherine DIMuro of 
Round Lake. Numerous nieces and nephews. He Is preceded 
in death by his parents, Peter and Helfrid; sister, Dorothy and 
brothers Niels and Paul. 

Memorial Services will be held at a later date. 

Vera Mary Wilder 

Of Round Lake Beach, passed away Thursday, Feb. 4, 
1999 at Provena St. Therese Medical Center In Waukegan. She 
was born In New Orleans, La. Mrs Wilder had made her 
home In Round Lake Beach since 1973 formerly of Chicago. 

She leaves her daughter, Vera Lobono of Round Lake- 
Beach; grandsons, James Michael Remillard and Dominic 
Christopher Lobono. Also surviving are her sister, Ruth 
Skiem of Round Lake Beach and her step daughter, Doris 
Patitz of Chicago and several nieces and nephews and dear 
friends. She is preceded in death by her parents, Henry 
(Modeste) Cousins; sister, Odessa Templeton and brother, 
Harold cousins. 

Funeral Mass was held at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 
Round Lake. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery in Grayslake. 

Memorials may be given to the American Cancer society 
in memory of Mrs. Wilder. 

Sharon D. Gorischek J 

Age 56 of Antioch, passed away Thursday, Feb. 4, 1999 at 
Provena St. Therese Medical Center in Waukegan. She was 
bom Jan. 29, 1943 in Chicago, the daughter of George and 
Phyllis Scanlon. In 1990 Mrs. Gorischek moved from Mt. 
Prospect to Antioch where she lived since. She enjoyed read- 
ing, playing bingo and dearly loved her grandchildren. On 
Nov. 2, 1971, she married John J. Gorischek in Chicago, 

Survivors include her husband, John Gorischek; five 
children, Bertha (Scott) Shuld or Crystal Lake, Sheila [Mike) 
Wager of Tennessee, Edward Gorischek of Wisconsin," 
Elizabeth CArky) Marian of Aurora and Joseph Gorischek of 
Antioch; four grandchildren, Brett, Tania, Corey and 
Kathrine, "they were her Inspiration;" Her mother, Phyllis. 
Scanlon of, California and two sisters, Patricia Baker and 
Debbie (Bill) Nickel, both of California. She is preceded in 
death by her father, George Scanlon In 1992. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial were held 
at St. Peter Church In Antioch. 

Friends and family called at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. - ' • 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch 
' Those desiring, may make contributions to the Provena 
St. Therese Medical Center Cardio-PuJmonary Rehabilitation 
Dept. 2615 Washington St, Waukegan, IL 60085-4988 in her 
memory.' 

LuGene Nissen Piefer 

Age 74 orWadsworth, passed away Friday, Feb. 5, 1999 
unexpectedly and quietly at her' home. She was bom in 
Mankato, Minn, on Aug. 9, 1924, the daughter of Walter and 
Lucille (Otto) Swanson and was raised in Mankato, and 
Minneapolis, Minn. She moved to Antioch In 1946 until 1987 
when she moved to Waukegan and then in 1989 to 
Wadsworth. She worked as a secretary for the Millbridge 
China Co. in Antioch and later at McDonalds in Waukegan 
for 11 years. On March 11, 1944, she married David Nissen 
and later married Donald Piefer on June 10, 1988. 

She is survived by her husband Donald Piefer of 
Wadsworth; her former husband, David Nissen of Antioch; 
her mother Lucille Swanson of Edlna, Minn.; her loving chll- . 
dren, Julie (Jerry) Peterson of Peachtree City, Ga„ Nicki 
(Thomas) Miller of Madison, Wis., James Nissen of 
Milwaukee, Wis., Dan (Terri) Nissen of Gumee, Karin (Tony). 
Van Delft of Spring Grove and Lawrence Donald Piefer of 
Salida, Colo, as well as seven grandchildren, Aaron, Matthew, 
Margo, Natalie, Jacqueline, Alfred and Ryan; her brother, 
Lowell (Dclorcs) Swanson of Edlna, Minn; her two sisters, 
Karen Casber of Bloomington, Minn, and Nadlne Swanson of 
Or land, Flu. 

LuGene was dearly loved by her family and will be 
missed by those lives that she has touched. She was especial- 
ly fond of her co-workers at McDonalds and her weekly 
acquaintances. She was also a kind, patient, nurturing and 
loving wife, mother, grandmother and friend. She was a 
friend to all animals and a mindful gardener. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch with'the Rev. Kurt Gomlln of the United Methodist 
Church of Antioch, officiating. 

Final disposition was with a private cremation. 

4 

Mae Kazda 

Age 96 of Grayslake, passed away on Sunday, Feb. 7, 1999 
at Manor Care Nursing facility, Libertyville. She was bom on 
Dec. 8, 1902 in Chicago and has been a resident of Grayslake 
in the Saddlebrook Farms community. 

She is survived by her daughters, Shirley LaBarbera of 
Des Plalncs and Lois Bonafede of Saddlebrook Farms; her 
grandchildren Bonnie LaBarbera, Linda (Kip) Krause, Carla 



LaBarbera, Dusty (Roberta) La Barbera, and Sandy Rcvis; and 
her six great grandchildren, Mae also leaves behind many 
loving and caring friends at Saddlebrook Farms. She is pre- 
ceded in death by her late husband Otto Kazda. 

There will be a Memorial Service on Saturday, Feb. 13, 
1999 at 10 am. at Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium, 
Ltd, 410 £ Belvidere Rd„ Grayslake. 

Interment will be private. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be offered to the Mac 
Kazda Memorial. 

Julius C. Mosansky 

Age 73, a longtime resident of Inglesldc and Fox Lake for 
over 53 years, died on Saturday, Jan. 23, 1999 at Northern 
Illinois Medical Center in McHenry. He was bom on Oct. 10, 
1925, the son of Charles and Margaret Mosansky (nee 
Bodolvsky) in McKeesport, Penn. He was employed for many 
years with Lincoln Manufacturing and Oak Industries in 
Crystal Lake, retiring In 1986. He was a veteran of WWII hav- 
ing served In the LLS. Navy. 

He is survived by four sons, John (Darleen) Mosansky of 
Lake Villa, Jeffrey (Felix)' Mosansky of California, James 
(Rosalinda) Mosansky of Texas, and Brian Mosansky of Fox ' 
Lake; his three daughters, Robin (Dan) Demjanlk of Georgia, 
Lorl ' (Steve) Klocek of Waukegan and Margaret (Scott) 
Edwards of Ingleslde; by 11 grandsons; 13 grand daughters 
and one great grand daughter, Venessa; by one sister, 
Madeline Giaser of Lincolnwood and by his niece, Deborah 
and other relatives. He Is preceded In death by his wife, 
Doreen in 1990. 

Funeral Services were conducted at the K. JC Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Ltd., Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 

Interment was at Grant Cemetery. 

Mark Findley II 

Age 21 of Ingleslde, died on Friday, Feb. 5, 1999 at 
Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, following an auto- 
mobile accident. He was bom on May 12, 1977 In Waukegan 
and had attended Grant Community High School In Fox 
Lake. 

He is survived by his wife, Julie A. Findley (nee Jeffery) 
Ingleslde; his daughter, Shauna; parents, Alice Costello or 
Arizona and Mark E, (Sue) Findley of Ingleslde; grandmoth- 
ers, Grace Findley of Ingleslde and Charlotte Warner of 
Florida; great grandmother, Annie Rob Inette of Virginia; 
brother, Michael Findley and his sister, Melissa Findley, both 
of Arizona; his stepsister, Erin and his stepbrother, Kevin. He 
Is preceded In death by one son, Jeremy and his grandfather, 
HoUis.Findiey. 

Friends and relatives visited at the K. 10 Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 
Funeral Services were held for family only. 
Interment was at Highland Memorial Park Cemetery, 
Libeityviile 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the 
American Tumor Association. 

Valerie J. Miller (nee Giesler) ' 

Age 64 of Antioch, passed away Sunday, Feb. 7, 1999, 
suddenly at her home. She wasborn July 15, 1934 in Chicago, 
the daughter of Arthur and Dorothy (Shilvock) Giesler. 
Valerie had lived in Lily Lake, Wis. before moving to Antioch 
in 1982 and had attended Wlimot High School, Wilmot, Wis. 
She worked for several years in Antioch as a dedicated deliv- 
ery person for newspapers and The Advertiser. On Nov. 9, 
1977, she married William Miller in Chicago and he preced- 
ed hef in death on Nov, 27, 1982. . 

Survivors include her mother, Dorothy Giesler with 
whom. she made her home; her brother, Raymond (Maria) 
Giesler of Burlington, Wis. and her nephew, Michael Giesler 
of Burlington, Wis. In addition to her husband, she is preced- 
ed in death by her father, Arthur Giesler. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. 

Interment was at Elmwood Cemetery, River Grove. . 

Those desiring may make contributions to a family 
memorial. 

DoreneJ. Brusca to 

Age 57, passed away Feb. 1, 1999 at the Condell Medical 
Center, Libertyville. She was bom on Aug. 29, 1941 In River 
Rouge, Mi. and has been a resident of Libertyville for the past 
1 1/2 years formerly of McHenry. Employed as a payroll 
accountant with Kenny Construction, and formerly with 
Bollanders for over 25 years.' 

Dorene leaves her son, Joseph Bruscato . of Antioch; 
mother, Corene M. Renaud of Livonia, Ml.; two sisters, Joy 
(Carl) Dragos of NorthvilleTwp., ML; Diana (Joe) Buchanan 
of Livonia, ML; several nieces, nephews, great nieces and 
great nephews. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Rev. Lisle J. 
Kauffman, pastor of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round 
Lake, officiating. 

Interment was privately held. 

Memorials may be given to the Condell Hospice in her 
memory, 

Alexandra Quinlan 

Age 64, passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 1999 at 

' Condell Medical Center, Libertyville, She was bom on Aug. 8, 

1934 in Chicago and has been a resident of Grayslake for the 

past four years, formerly of Buffalo Grove. A very dedicated 

Please see page CIO 



' 
9 



' 









~e 



C 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES/COUNTY 



February 12, 1999 






' 



State legislators call for better 
funding of Lake County roads 



Standing at the roadside of 
Illinois Route 41, State Senator Terry 
Link (D-Vernon Hills), State Rep. 
Lauren Beth Gash (D-Highland 
Park) and State Rep. Susan Garrett 
(D-Lake Forest) asked Governor 
George Ryan to address the road 
construction- problems that are 
plaguing this much traveled high- 
way in their district. The three Lake 
County legislators arc seeking funds 
from the fiscal year 2000 budget that 
Governor Ryan will present this 
month so that work can begin on 
this road that is vital for many Lake 
County residents. 

"I think it is time that Lake 
County residents start to get back 
some of the money they are sending 
to Springfield in the form of road 
construction funds," Link said. "For 
too long Lake County has been 
promised dollars and told that the 
programs are in the planning phase. 
However, when anyone drives north 
of the Lake-Cook border on Route 
41, it is evident that these promises 



have not been kept. We want to see 
action taken and that is why we are 
asking Governor Ryan to take a good 
look at this important artery through 
Lake County." 

Illinois Route 4 1 has been on the 
list of projects from the Illinois 
Department of Transportation 
(IDOT) for the last three years. 
However, the progress has been only 
superficial and the emphasis contin- 
ues to be on the purchase of new 
pieces of land. Little progress has 
been made in the actual resurfacing 
and reconstruction of this main 
artery which'is vital for many of the 
Lake County residents who travel 
north into Wisconsin or south into 
Cook County. 

"Senator Link, Representative 
Garrett and I stand together in our 
call for smarter road funding in Like 
County and in the state of Illinois," 
said Rep. Lauren Beth Gash. "We con- 
tinue to see millions of dollars spent 
on new tollways and highways, while 
our existing roads continue to deteri- 



orate. This is wrong, and I think the 
residents of Lake County want exist- 
ing roads repaired before we contin- 
ue to build new roads that .we will not 
be able to maintain." 

Link also announced that along 
with Gash and Garrett he would be 
forming a task force whose purpose 
would be to study Route 41, meet 
with residents who use this road, 
and lobby Governor Ryan and other 
legislators in Springfield to send 
additional road construction funds 
back to Lake County. Link 
announced that mayors and others 
along Illinois Route 41 will be sent 
letters as the group begins its organi- 
zation process. 

"I believe it is important that we 
secure transportation funds for Lake 
County now," said' Rep. Susan 
Garrett. "I look forward to working 
with Sen. Link and Rep. Gosh and 
the members of our Route 41 
Corridor Task force as we continue 
to fight to bring additional road 
funds back to Lake County." 



Lake County Board outlines 
action plan for next two years 



Lake County Board members 
did their own version of a top 10 
listing when they outlined subjects 
that will be priorities during the 
next two years. 

. Overall goals developed by the 
Board include: 

• effective transportation sys- 
tem for moving people through 
variety of modes 

• balanced growth through 
planned development and revital- 
ization 

• preservation of natural 
resources and environmental qual- 
ity 

• financially stable county gov- 
ernment providing cost-effective, 
accessible services 

• strong local economy with 
diverse businesses and quality job 
opportunities. 

"We had a two-day consensus 
building workshop in which we laid 
the foundation that we want to 
build upon for the next couple of 
years," Board Chairman Jim 
LaBcIle said. "With all Board mem- 



bers participating, we ranked a 
number of policy targets and then 
grouped them into top, high and 
moderate areas for action. There 
were a number of subjects that did 
not make the policy target cut. That 
doesn't mean they're not impor- 
tant. In fact, work is being done on 
many of them. It's that we need to 
focus our efforts on things to do 
during the next two years to sup- 
port longer-term goals." 

Top areas for County Board 
action include: 

University Center commit- 
ment and direction 

• secure enabling legislation 

• make decisions; governance 
structure and funding 

Unified development ordi- 
nance 

• review process and timetable 

• work with the community 

• address attainable housing 

• refine the document 

• coordinate with Watershed 
Development Ordinance 

County Road Improvements 



Strategy 

• review status and plans for 
county and state roads 

• determine road priorities 

• pursue Improvement of state 
roads 

• develop lobbying coalition 

High areas for County Board 
action, in no particular order, were 
named as follows: 

County-Municipalities-Other 
Government relations: Strategy and 
action plan 

• work with municipalities 

• identify problems/issues of 
mutual concern 

• conduct a summit with other 
governmental officials 

• develop process for ongoing 
communications 

• improve relations with other 
governmental officials 

Comprehensive capital 

improvement program develop- 
ment and funding 

• take inventory of capital 
needs of county 



Habitat volunteer 

■ 

meeting 



* 



Habitat for Humanity Lake 
County will hold its monthly 
Volunteer Orientation meeting 
on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Habitat for Humanity office 
at 315 N. Utica In Waukogan. The 
meetings! which take place on 
the third Tuesday of each month 
(except December), provide an 
opportunity to learn about 
Habitat and its volunteer needs. 
The program will Include a 
slldeshow presentation. 

Habitat continues to have an 
urgent need for skilled construction 
workers. Also needed are a paralegal, 
persons to help plan fundraising 
events and persons to help organize 
the warehouse for construction sup- 
plies, and tools. Other volunteer 
opportunities include general con- 
struction, staffing the building 
material resale program, picking up 




donated items office work and more. 
Groups as well as individuals are 
welcome. 

Habitat for Humanity Lake 
County Is the local affiliate of 
Habitat for Humanity International, 
a non-profit, ecumenical^ Christian 
housing ministry. '.which'. seeks., to, 
eliminate poverty housing and 
: homelessness worldwideV-Habltat Is 
not a give-away program.Hbrhes are 
sold to partner families at no profit 
with no interest mortgages. Each 
family is required to contribute 500 
hours on the construction of their 
home or other Habitat needs. House 
payments are recycled to build more 
homes for struggling families, in qui;, 
community, jj ,,., 

There is no obligation > for,; 
attending the meeting. For more, 
information call Habitat at 623-1020 
weekdays. 



LOCAL DIGEST 



Dating Game 
at LCCIL 

Lake County Center for 
Independent Living will host 
Dating Game on Saturday, Feb. 13 
from 7 p.m. to midnight. Free 
admission. All are welcome to 
watch or play the game and 
socialize with Deaf/Hard of 
Hearing people. It will be held at 
Lake County Center for 
Independent Living, 706 E. 
Hawley St., Mundelein. Bring 
dessert and a sign language inter- 
preter for hearing people will be 
provided. Contact person: Delynn 
Saunders,- ' Deaf.'M Services 
Coordinator 949-4440 TTY/V. 

Paradise Club 

A discussion group for people 
who want to explore alcohol and/or 
drug use In their lives. 

Join in every first Tuesday of the 
month from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Lake 
County Center for Independent 
Living, 706 W. Hawley St., 
Mundelein. 

Your friends and facilitators: 
Wendie and Mike. For more infor- 
mation, call 949-4440 V/TTY 

Strict confidentiality 

College/Career 
Day at CLC 

On Feb. 19, a College/ Career 
Day will be held at the College of 
Lake County from 8:30 a.m. until 



2:30 p.m. for high school .students 
with disabilities. Representatives 
from various midwestern , colleges 
will be present, and participating; 
students will be offered a free-pizza . 
lunch and participation in raffles, To 
register for the; program or for, fur- 
ther informaUoh, call Chris tie.Gilson 
at 949-4440 (V/TTY). 

Seeing Eye guide 
dogs program 

Oh Feb. 22, from 7 until 8:30 
p.m., Jay Stitely, of Seeing Eye in 
Morristown, NJ, will speak about 
guide dogs for peoplevyjio^ are bjirut * 
The program will be h'elci at the Lake 
County Center for Independent 
Living, 706 E. Hawley St., in 
Mundelein. To register for the pro-, 
gram or to request an accorrimoda^ 
tion, call Christie Gilson at 949-4440) 
(V/TTY) by Feb. 14. 

Toys for children 
with disabilities 

On Feb. 23, Joan Moskswitz 
and Lisa Schiro of Lekotek will' 
conduct a seminar on toys for 
children with disabilities. The 
program will be held from 7 until 
8:30 p.m. at the Lake County 
Center for Independent Living, 
706 E. Hawley St., in Mundelein: , 
To register for the program or to 
request an accommodation, call 
Christie Gilson at 949-4440 
(V/TTY) by Feb. 14. 



t\ 



(Continued from page C9 

and devoted mother and grandmother. 

She Is survived by licr children, 
Tracy Q. (Nicholas) Nikitow of Grayslake,- 
Shannon P. . (Mark) Stevenson of 
Waukegan, Richard F. Qulnlan jr. of 
Vernon Hills, Terrence J. (Linda) Qulnlan 
of Gary, Michael S. Quintan of Round 
Lake Beach; grandmother of Kira, 
Courtney, Mcaghan, Alexis, Bailey and 
Kyle; sister of Valery (Paul) Kohut of 
Richardson, Tex., Ion (Cindy) Wargo of 
Deerfield; sister -fn-law to Eleanore 
Qulnlan of Chicago and several nieces 
and nephews. Alexandra is preceded in 
death by her husband, Richard F. 
Quinlan Sr. on Sept.. 1G, 1996 and sister, 
Yotanda. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake. 

Interment was privately held. 

Memorials may be given to the 
American Heart Association in her mem- 
ory. 

Kathleen Proctor (nee 

Wffloughby) 

Age 46, a resident of Fox Lake, for- 

- 



merly of Kentucky, died Wednesday, Feb. 
3, 1999 at home. She was bom on Sept. 9, 
1952 in Cincinnati, Ohio and had been 
employed with Staples (office supplies 
supplier) for the past four years. She 
attended St. Stephen Lutheran Church in 
Antioch. 

Survivors include: her husband, 
Scott S. Proctor of Fox Lake; her 
daughter, Sunny Proctor of Fox Lake; 
her mother, Emily Wllloughby of 
Kentucky; seven brothers, Bill, Roger, 
Joe, Johnny, Lemix, Craig arid Eric 
Willoughby; one sister, Diane Hicks of 
Kentucky; nieces, nephews and other 
relatives survive, as well as many 
friends. She Is preceded In death by 
her father, William Wllloughby. 

Friends of the family visited at the K. 
K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake- 
(The Chapel on the Lake). 
.- A private interment was held 

Memorials to the American Cancer 
Society, would be appreciated by the 
family. . 

Frances M. Jensen 

Age 87 of Fox Lake, passed away on 
Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1999 at Manorcare of 
Libertyville In Llbcrlyvillc. She was born 
in Chicago on July 29, 1911, the daughter 



or the late J, Maurice and Kristina 
Rasmussen. She was a member of Trinity 
Lutheran Church In Long Lake for 38 
years, and for 34 of those years, she 
served as the Church organist. 

She is survived by her daughter, 
Sheila Jensen of Vail, Ariz, and her 
grandchildren, Gail Schuctt of Vail, 
Ariz., Cheryl Menncnoh of Vail, Ariz., 
Lee Jensen of Tilton, NH„ Frank 
Hernadez of Fox Lake and Keith 
Jensen of inglcslde. Also surviving are 
her great grandchildren, Jennifer, 
Kenneth, KImberiy, Carey Ann,. 
Christine, Billy and Eric and her great, 
great grandchildren, Brian Courtney, 
John and Kristofcr. She Is preceded in 
death by her daughter, Nancy, her son, 
Roy and a brother, Robert. 

Memorial Services were held at the 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Long Lake. 

Funeral Arrangements. were made 
by the RInga Funeral Home, Cake Villa, 

Charles D. Blythe 

Age 65, passed away on Monday, 
Feb. 1, 1999 at Northwestern Memorial 
Hospital, ChIcago.'He was born on Jan, 
!6, 1931 and has been a resident of 
Gurnee for the past 30 years, formerly of 
South Dartmouth, Ma. Charles was a vet- 

■ 



eran of the U.S. Army. He retired from 
Dalrd and Warner Real Estate where he 
was employed as a real estate agent. Prior 
employment with Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber in marketing and sales. A gradu- 
ate from Brown University and also past 
volunteer for MRP tax preparation for 
seniors. 

He leaves his wife, Sally to whom he 
wed on April 28, 1962 In Wiimctte; chil- 
dren, Ann (Drad Kucharski) Blythe of 
Evanston; Charles (fiancee, Lisa Buckles) 
Blythe of Novi, Ml.; mother, Emma Blythe 
of Waverly, Ohio; brother, Sam (Elaine) 
Blythe of New Paltz, NY; several nieces 
and nephews. He is preceded in death by 
his father, Charles B. in 1989 and brother, 
Dennis in 1968. 

Memorial Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the 
Rev. Kathleen Bleyaert, officiating. 

Interment was privately held. " 

Memorials may be given to the 
Gurnee Rescue Squad or the Charily of 
choice, In memory of Charles. 

Angeline D. Orlando 

Age 74 of Round Lake Park, passed 
"away Wednesday, Feb. 3, 1999 at Condell 
Medical Center In Libertyville. She was 



bom June 18, 1924 In Chicago and had v 
made her home In Round Lake since 
1958. 

She leaves her. loving children; 
Barbara Infantino of Round Lake Park, 
Robert (Marcia) Orlando of Round Lake 
Beach; dear' grandmother of Steven ; 
Orlando of Phoenix, Ariz., Daniel (Amy) 
Wackcr of St. Charles, Mo. and Brian 
Wackcr of O'Fallon, Mo.; dear great 
grandmother of Nicholas and Zachery 
Wackcr. of St. Charles, Mo.; fo/id sjs't,er { pfg 
Lena Orlando of Elko, Nev., Pauline 
Vernctti of Hanover Park, Charles 
(Bertha) Tcresi of Bloomlngton, , Minnl 
and Frank (Irene) Teres! of Vancouver, 
Wash. She is preceded in death by her 
parents, Antonla (Ida) Teresi; her loving 
husband, James; son-in-law, Jim 
Infantino and brother-in-laws, Joe 
Orlando and Frank Vernelti. 

Funeral Services were held at the, 
Strang Funeral Chapel and, 
Crematorium, Ltd,, Grayslake with the 
Associate. Pastor Paul Gakhutt of the: 
Shepherd of the Lakes Lutheran Church' 
of Grayslake, officiating. 

Interment followed at the St. Joseph 
Cemetery in Round Lake. 
Memorials may be given to the Round 
Lake Fire Dept. in her'memory. 



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I. 

5* 



ne- 
ch 



LIPSERVICE 







C1 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



February 12, 1999 



Get it off your chest (847)223-8073 

Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipservice@lpnews.coin 

Upservlce Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland Newspapers. Lake- 
land Newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland News- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain 
(torn printings message. Call In at 223-8073, fax In at 223-8810, or e-mail at lipser- 
ylce@lpmws.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name. Names and phone numbers will not be printed; 
however, callers may be caBed for verification. 

Thump on head' 



I'd like to give the Village of 
Wadsworth a thump on the head 
for thenew addition to "Welcome 
to Wadsworth sign. We now have 
on the bottom of all 12 signs say- 
ing, "Home of Mrs. Illinois Inter: 
national." I feel that its one thing 
for her to put on her license plate 
"Mrs. Illinois" but It's another 
thing for the village to spend the 
money to add 12 new signs onto 
it's already existing "Welcome to 
Wadsworth" signs, broadcasting 
the fact that she resides in this vil- 
lage. I do think there are a lot of 
other people that live in this town 
that are worthy of mention, like 
those raising mentally retarded 
children, foster parents, those 
helping with the elderly. To say 
"Home of Mrs. Illinois Interna- 
tional" because she won a beauty 
contest, doesn't seem as worthy. 
Who paid, for these signs? And 
" why? You can verify this with the 
Village df Wadsworth. Observe the 
signs for yourself. They are in 
front of Village Hall or at any road * 
entering the village. 

Wadsworth 

'Yes' dismiss it 

In regards to the question "Should 
the senate dismiss the impeach- 
ment trial?" The media reports are 
going to say "yes" dismiss it, let it 
go, get on with this and that. I may 
as well walk down the street with 
a gun.-chase down little 18-year- 
old girls, rob banks, write bad 
checks and everything else. This 
man's a lying fraudulent murder? 
er and everyone is saying "let him 
go". He should have resigned be- 
fore the whole thing started. 

Gurnee 

Starr wrong 

In response to the question of the 
week, "Should the senate dismiss 
the impeachment trial?" I think 
they should dismiss the impeach- 
ment trial. I think Starr should get 
put of this, because I think there is 
something wrong with him. 

Harvard 

Referendum 

Well, the bill for the uncontrolled 
development that has been pro- 
moted by the Antioch Village 
board, Is on its way to every prop- 
erty owner, regardless if they live< 
in the village or the township. This . 
bill represented by the upcoming 
school building referendum is a 
„ tax burden of supplying more 
schools for all the new develop- 
ments. Mind you the developers 
never asked, us to share in their 
profits but certainly rely on us to 
subsidize their buildings by pay-, 
ing for new schools and living 
with the road. Antioch's an- 
nouncement of the new tax in- 
crease in the building referendum 
will in part seek to build a small 22 
classroom school. The cost of 
building is known.: What is not 
, publicized, is how much would 
the added tax burden be after op- 
erating costs are all added up. The 
simple fact that every public 
school is obligated to have its own 
principal assistant principal and 
many other numerous offices of 
bureaucracy. It is sure that the 



building cost is only the tip of the 
iceberg. If things were done hon- 
estly, and ethically, they would 
seek approval of the referendum 
first. Then allow the development 
to proceed. 

Antioch 

Former Antioch 

.Comment on "Antioch Warning." 
It's unfortunate, but true whatyou 
said. If you don't have two newer 
vehicles in your garage and "Mr. 
and Mrs. Well-to-do" on your 
mailbox, it won't be easy for you 
in Antioch. I sure do miss the days 
where love and "help thy neigh- 
bor" was a familiar thought, and 
block parties were all the rage. 
AlsOj I would continue the boycott 
of Jewel milk prices $3.34 per gal- > 
Ion milk is criminal and they 
should be ashamed of themselves. 

FoxLdke 

No impeachment 

Regarding this week's question, 
"Should the senate dismiss the im- 
peachment trial?" I say they should . 
definitely not dismiss the Impeach- 
ment trial. Nothings convinced me 
more than. President Clinton's own 
testimony, when he turned a ''yes" 
Into a "no." Then he tried to justify 
the false testimony he had given un- 
der oath, with mental reservations. 
Like saying that depends on the de- 
finition of "Is". How ridiculous. We 
are not told the truth about many 
things. Last week there was an up- 
roar about a Chicago hospital that 
wanted to perform a placebo brain 
surgery on a group of peopIe.Did 
you know that thanks to President 
Clinton, it is no longer necessary for 
a doctor to get consent to perform 
any surgeries' or tests. Shades of 
Adolph Hitler. President Clinton 
doesn't care about people. He does- 
n't care about truth. This is more 
than a matter of the president versus 
an intern. We can say that Clinton's 
bombings were necessary to keep 
him in office. How come we don't 
hear about the degrees of impeach- 
ment? If President Clinton is im- 
peached by a simple majority, he 
can still be in office, but he will be 
with limited powers. That sounds a 
lot better to me than just a dismissal 
after all we've been through. 

Fox Lake. 

'Lake Woodview' 

Last week I took a walk behind 
Woodview Grade School In 
Grayslake. 1 noticed a lot of stand- 
ing water around the new mobile 
class rooms. In a hard rain or 
melting snow, it almost looks like 
"Lake Woodview." The bus road is 
flooded, covered with ice and very 
dangerous. It seems the mobile 
class rooms were located in the 
lowest area of the park. Is the park 
in a flood plain? Was the, Village of 
Grayslake or Corps of Engineers 
consulted for flooding before. 
$750,000 and a 600-foot bus road 
constructed? At what taxpayer ex- 
pense will It cost to correct the 
flooding for what is a "temporary 
fix" to our problem 

Grayslake 

More girl sports 

High School girlssports are at an 
all time popularity high. Why do 
you not cover high school girl 



LAST WEEK'S QUESTION WAS: 

What was your favorite commercial during the Super Bowl? 

THIS WEEK'S QUESTION IS: 

How do you feel about the Senate's Impeachment vote? 



• » 



sports more? I have two daughters 
whom have received "softball" 
scholarships through the 
Mundelein High School sports 
programs. Photos of girls sports in 
your paper are very, very rare and 
the articles are so short compared 
to the so-called guy sports. Where 
have you people been, on another 
planet? I subscribed to your paper 
for the high school "girls" sport 
coverage. Oh, well. My subscrip- 
tion expires soon. 

Mundelein 

Establishment name? 

Called once before to complain 
about an establishment and was 
told that I can't use the establish- . 
ment's name, but I keep Creadlng 
about people who complain 
about the prices at Jewel. You 
print the Jewel name. If that's the 
case, then how about printing the 
name of the fast food restaurant in 
Wauconda that keeps screwing up 
the orders. That's happened to 
me, too. 

Wauconda 

Carry dog bag 

To the girl with the blue jacket and 
the blond dbg that walks her dog 
from Countryside and down into 
Hunters Creek and Pheasant 
Ridge, we are not here for her con- 
venience. I am sick of going out 
and cleaning up her dog waste 
from the sidewalk. I think if she is 
going to have dogs, she should . 
carry a dog bag, which is required 
by law and be a responsible per- 
son. We are not here for her. 

Grayslake 

'Get no respect' 

I work in a convenient class gas 
station and this is for all you rude 
people that throw your money at 
me and get upset because I . thro w 
it back at you. If it wasn't forme, 
you wouldn't have this kind of ser- 
vice. I expect the same respect 
from you. Start handing me the 
money, don't throw it at me and I 
won't throw it back at you. I'm 
here for eight hours a day, you're 
only here for two seconds Hand 
me the money. 

Hainesvilte 

Newsworthy? 

Why do you give Jim Walton any 
press? Whatever the election is, he 
says he is running for mayor, or 
trustee but he never does. Person- 
al circumstances he says. It's be- 
cause the truth about him Is going 
to come out. Fifth dollars per 
meeting to sit on the Village Plan- 
ning and Zoning board and he 
can't even legally vote. Nine years 
of village board attending under 
the name Jim Lohenry. Look at 
the minutes. Is this clown really 
newsworthy? 

" Fox Lake 

Parents set limits 

Amen to "Early to Bed' in the Feb. 
. 5 issue. I too am a Antioch High 
School parent. Leave the schedule 
as it is. I'd rather see my kids start 
early than come, home late. 
Evening should be for homework, 
extra curricular activities, jobs and 
fun. Parents need to set the limits. 
Kids need to learn to manage their 
time and be held accountable for 
it. I see the teens walking around 
the neighborhood riding their 
bikes, ATV's,:etc. at around 9, 10 
even 11 p.m. Make them go, to 
bed. We. cannot keep adjusting 
the world to accommodate them. 



The working world will not allow ' 
them to set their own schedule 
and sleep in. Don't we wish we 
could do that?. We cannot. We are 
supposed to lead and they are 
supposed to follow. Some day 
they will be the leaders, we have to 
make sure that they can lead. 

Antioch 

Don't throw stones 

About the article on Roy Gun- 
delach oh Jan. 29fFirst of all, Dr. 
Dam should not call Roy a patho- . 
logical liar because "those who 
live in glass houses should not 
throw stones." As for Kathy Dam, 
ex-Gundelach, it's time to get over 
• your marriage and let the election 
be based on experience and not 
on your own personal problems. 

Inglcside 

Upset in Round Lake 

r\ am a very upset parent with 
Magee School in District 116. My 
child attends the school and I 
have tried calling to get her as- 
signments. When I called, the sec- 
retary told me that I did not call 
early enough to get her assign- 
ments. So, I could not get her as- 
signments. Well, District 116, 
working parents do not always 
have easy accessibility to the 
phone. I apologize for my work 
-schedule; which does not coincide 
with the teachers' work schedule.* 
It does not state in the note, 
WHEN I can call to get her work 
assignments. I apologize again to 
the Round Lake School TJistrict 
but again my child is at your mer- 
cy for teaching. I am an upset par- 
ent. 

Round Lake Beach 

Who is she? 

Regarding President Clinton, I 
don't care what happens to him. 
Who does Monica Lewinski think 
she is, actually bringing down a 
president? She should be thrown 
in jail, fined or sent to some "slut" 
town. 

Round Lake Beach 

Morals for kids 

In respect to the article "Who 
Cares" I am 14 years and old and I 
do. I know people who care to. I 
think the impeachment trial 
should not go on because it's not 
fair to the children of our country. 
That we will have to grow up and 
answer to people in other coun- 
tries. It seems that our country 
doesn't have any morals anymore. 
We fought against Britain because 
they thought we didn't have any 
morals, and they wouldn't give us ^ 
any religious freedom or anything" 
like that. We wanted to have a 
country .with morals. Our forefa- 
thers set forth this nation so that 
we could have morals. That we 
could be better than other coun- 
tries. I heard on a radio show, that 
the president put his hand on the 
Bible and lied. A mother called up 
devastated because she asked her 
son "who broke the lamp?" She 
knew it was him, but he said he 
didn't know. When he told her he 
"didn't know" she said,. "I know 
that you did it and that youare ly- 
ing." He said, "The president lies 
and has nothing happen to him, 
why can't I." Why should I be 
punished, if the president doesn't 
get punished? It's sad that our 
children have an example like 
that Hundreds of people are in 
jail for perjury. It doesn't seem fair 



to those that had to go to jail, if the 
president can do it. Our leader 
lied and committed perjury and 
he doesn't even get punished for 
it. 

Lake Villa 

Read the book 

Why aren't Grayslake officials com- 
plaining loudly about the "stink" 
emanating from the garbage 
.dump? Could it be because they 
are being paid $20 million over the 
years to .look the other way? Why 
hasn't the village explained the 
problem in the village newsletter? 
Is the newsletter only for bragging 
about how good they are? Instead 
of information, we. get a Trustee 
Perry, writing about how garbage 
and smell I presume, is benefiting 
the village. There is a book in the 
Grayslake library, called "Toxic 
Sludge is Good for You." Perry 
should check it out today. 

Grayslake 



III children 



In regards to the wonderful peo- 
ple of Antioch that let their chil- 
dren go to school sick with strep 
throat and pink eye.- Because of 
your ignorance,' our family has 
lost over $2,000 for one week. My 
husband had to stay home be- 
cause he had strep throat, my kids 
couldn't go to school, because 
they had It and pink eye. I could- 
n't go to workbecause 1 had strep 
throat. The doctor says it costs 
about $60 per person. That's $300. 
That 's not including all the pre- 
scriptions that we had to buy. 
Thank God bur insurance covered 
the prescriptions. Our prescrip- 
tions came up to $60. All because 
of the people that don't realize 
that their kids are sick. If you're 
not aware of these Hlnesses, lean 
explain it to you. Strep throat — If 
your child is complaining about a 
sore throat, coughing, crying, look 
in the back of their throat. If you 
see that it's inflamed or swollen, 
with possibly white specks or 
maybe even blood. That's the sign 
of a very contagious disease called 
strep throat. Pink Eye is very con- 
tagious also. If your child has red 
or glassy looking eyes, are com- . 
plaining that their eyes are burn- 
ing, and they have yellow mucous 
at the corner of their eyes. If you 
pull the bottom of their lash and it- 
looks bright red and is inflamed. 
That is pink eye, people. Because 
of your ignorance, our family had 
to suffer. Take" time to look at your 
children. 

Antioch 

Good meat, bad meat 

In response about the woman 
who called about "Quality Meat." 
She said that red meat is good 
meat and the purple meat inside 
the ground beef is old meat. 
That's not true. Good quality 
meat is purple, when it first 
comes out of the animal, it simply 
turns red after exposure to oxy- 
gen. So the outside of her meat is 
red because it's been exposed to 
oxygen. The inside is purple, be- 
cause it is not. That means that 
the inside meat is a better quality 
than the red meat on the outside. 
\ Grayslake 

Appreciate thanks 

This is the guy who bought the 
Fox Lake paper at the Clark sta- 
tion. You are very welcome. I ap- 
preciate the thank you. 

Fox Lake 












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M 



C 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



VALENTINES 



February 12, 1999 




Tailor your message 




• 



On the most romantic day 
of the year, you can send 
a perfectly-tailored, per- 
sonal message of 
"amour" with carefully selected 
flowers. Sure, roses are the tradi- 
tional blossom of love, but why no- 
texpand creatively on that theme 
by adding Baby's Breath, which sig- 
nify a pure heart, or Blue Violets, 
which indicate faithfulness. 

Below are a sampling of other 
flowers and their meanings from 
which you can design a detailed 
testament of your affection. 

Carnation, red — Admiration 

Carnation, white — Pure and ar- 
dent love 

Chrysanthemum — Friendship 
Daisy — Loyalty, gentleness 



Let Fannie 
Mae pop 
the question 
for you 



Thinking of 'popping the 
question; to your loved one this 
Valentine's Day? Fanny May 
Candies would love to share this 
momentous occasion with you 
by offering its 
new "Will You 
Marry Me? 
box. This 
special 
packag- 
• ing will 
be avail- 
able at 
both 
Fanny 
May and 
Fanny 
Farmer re- 
tail outlets. 

For the first time ever, Fanny 
May candies has created a special 
heart-shaped insert that fits inside 
the lid of its classic heart-shaped 
box of 2 pounds or greeting asking 
the questions, "Will You Marry 
Me?" The box can be customized 
with all of your sweetheart's Fanny 
May favorites. A space will be left 
in the center of the collection to fit 
a ring box inside. 

"We were told a story about a 
man who proposed marriage on 
Valentine's Day while giyihg his 
lady a box of Fanny Mae candies," 
says Sara Runde, marketing com- 
munications manager for the leg- 
endary candy maker. "The bride 
was so touched by the romantic 
gesture that she kept the heart- 
shaped box for years as a keepsake. 
We thought customizing our Valen- 
tine's pay boxes would help make 
that moment even more special." 

For those interested in mak- 
■ ing this Valentine's Day the most 
memorable one ever, just ask the 
Fanny May Candles sales associ- 
ate assisting you to help you cre- 
ate a perfect box for no addition- 
al charge. 




Forget-me-not — True love 
Forsythia — Anticipation 
Globe Amaranth — Unfading love 
Ivy — Fidelity 
Primrose — Young love 
Rose, pink — .Perfect happiness 

Rose, white — Charm and inno- 
cence 

Rose, red — Love and desire 

Rosebud — Beauty and youth 

Stephanotis — Happiness in mar- 
riage 

Tulip — You are the perfect lover 

Courtesy of Article Resource Associ- 
ation, www.aracopy.com 




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Valentine's Day Special g^f 
3 Day Weekend! % 

Spedal Heart Shaped Desserts &KavioU 

602 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

(847) 247-2208 

Call for Reservations! 
Special Sunday Hours 

Tues.-Thurs,-ll-9; 




Frl.-Sat. 11-10 




J, 





jj^fi3^\fe#i33S 






Give a gift certificate that 
shows you really care.. . 



MASSAGE 



PREMIER CHIROPRACTIC CENTER 

31 South Seymour Avenue • Grayslake, IL 60030 

543 1055 




*-v * *»Srn 



February 12, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C13 






Iciiiified (uarfuicle 

STitmatnir.emrnlt 

Notices f , , 77. , . , .'", ...I to 

Lost & Found . . . , . .1 15 

Free ; 120 

Personals , 125 

Auctions ,130 

Business Personals . . .135 



mrji&jpr,ri& 



.219 
.220 
.221 



's 



Help Wanted Purt-Tnnc 
Help Wanted Full-Time 
Einploynieiit Agencies 

Business Opportunities 22 

*Sil^j!lfons'\VunTcd V 228 

CI i i Id Cure ..... 
School/Instructi on 




.ttrkrt Stmt tilne 

eBWJMMiiif»mgj5at>ii : i ,i i,,iiiiiwpnwi en 

Antiques . ,301 

Appliances 304 

Barter/Trade 308 

Bazaars/Crafts ...310 

Building Materials . . .314 

Business/Office Equipment .318 

lileciroiiics/Computcrs .320 

Furm Guide . .'.. . \ 324 

Firewood ;......, 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales , .330 

Good Things To Eat 334 

Horses 'A. Tuck ", .338 

Household Goods/Furniture 340 

Jewelry • ; 344 

Lawn/Garden 348 

Clothing .349 

Miscellaneous 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies 354 

Musical Instruments 358 

Pets & Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Tools & .Machinery 36S 

■Wanted To Buy 370 



Homes For Sale .............. .500 

Homes For Rent 504 

Homes Wanted '. . .* 508 

Homes Builders . .'. * .510 

Condo/Tosvn Homes .51 4 

Mobile Homes .' 518 

Apartments For Rem .520 

Apartments Wanted . . .524 

Apt/Homes To Share 528 

Rooms For Rent' .."........... .530 

Buildings .533 

Business Property For Sale 534 

Business Property For Rent .538 

Investment Property ,540 

MortgJgJ-SerVfees 544 

■ Farms ; ' .548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage -. 560 

Rcsorts/Vucalioii Rentals .564 

Out Of Area Properly 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanted 574 

-Rent Estate Misc. 578 




Services & Purls .... . ... . , 

Car Loaivs/liisunince' . . ■ ! , 



t'enftee.0bSJi cSlortt l 



ecreatlaruit 

Recreational Vehicles '.V>. ,*".... .;. .'"V~. f.704 

Snowmobiles/ATVs .'.:..'.:............... ■ . f.708 

: BoatsVMntors/F.tc. ,.;..; 710 

Camping ■. 714 

Travel/Vacation , > 718 

Sports. Equipment . . '. .',.:. ■• '.-.' '. . V72Q 

Airplanes ........' 724 

<L*triitttparl(tttoit 

Curs For Sale . . .804 

Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

.t,..« ,"•>• ,814 

.818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps .828 

Trucks/Trailers .834 

Heavy Equipment .838 

Motorcycles .844 

Wanted To Buy . '. .848 

■>' 'WW ■>■■" ''f^JI ' 

;■■ 

Lii_ iuiai. . /.^i>^SLi.-i.-._i..-y^-lii^^ii-u.i..i.^:, 9HBBS 

Appliances Repair * '. .S0.1 

Blacktop . -S06 

Builders .' S09 

Carpentry , .......... .SI 2 

Carpel Cleaning : S15 

Concrete/Cement .. ..'».. . SI 8 

Dry Wall .S21 

Education/Instruction S24 

Electrical .S27 

Firewtwd ..;...,.. .S30 

Handyman .....'. S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning .S3G 

Housekeeping-. ."; •■ S39 

Landscaping . .- S42 

Uiimdry/Clcnuiug S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services '. S5 1 

Moving/Storage • .S54 

Pain line; Decorating ■ . • • ■ -S57 

l*urulegul/Ty|n!ig Services S60 

Plumbing S63 

Pools .S66 

Pressure Washing . . . '■ . -S69 

Professional Services .....' S72 

• S75 

; S78 

v.. •...."..;. /,..... S8I 

:%-, S84 

S87 

,.\ S90 

'. ;S93 

....,.'.: S9G 

'....S99 



Radion'V tteptilr 
Remodeling .'.-. 
Resumes ...... 

Roollng/SidingV, 

Slorug'c%?i 
Tux. Service ... 
Trees/Plants . .' 
Wedding . ,. ... 
Miscellaneous". 



& 



titrivution 



Kenosha 
County 



TWInLikei Silver Lake, 



Brlitol 



Richmond 




Johnsburfl 



MeHonry^ * 



Crystal 
Lake 

McIIcnry 
County 



' 



Antloch 



w 



Uko 
Villa 



Llndenhurat 



Kenotha 



Mlllburn , 




laland Lake 



Waiiconda 



North 
Barrlngton Lake^urlch 

Klldeor 



Bon 
E) Widiworth 

OuniM 

Woukeganj 

North " 
Mn Chlca(jo 

Oakt"-*-^.. 

® Vernon ubcrtyvllle -•-• .» J 
Ht,i ' L.k.Fo,«t\ 



Barrlngton 



.Long,. 
Grove 



Highland Park 



Doerfleld 



Palallno 
Cook County 



Buffalo Grove 



Northbrook 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 





BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

d Y Lakeland Newspapers 
*7a 1 1 P.O. Box 268 

MAIL Grayslake, IL 60030 



Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

iVntioch News • Round Luke News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelcin News • Wadswortli News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gitniee Press • Lindcnliurst New^s 

Waticonda Leader • Libertyvillc News 





IN 30 S.Whitney SL 

PERSON Grayslake 

BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 



Direct Line,... Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. 10am 
HOURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs, 

\J tit l l~ —* \J I \ I * m » m * + w * * * + * * * w t t * r w * * + -r + * * * * * w * *X I J UUV. 




as sine 




d 




Newspapers 



no 



Notices 



110 


f Notices 



120 



Free 



125 



Personals 




ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate i 

errors, but if one should • 

■occur, please report it 

immediately as we can be 

responsible for the first two 

(2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD 



NEEDED: 

73 PEOPLE TO S 

LOSE 5-100 LBS. 

CALL 1-800-806-3196 

FOR MORE 

INFORMATION. 



m 
^ 



HYPNOSIS 

WHY DO THOUSANDS 

OF PEOPLE SAY 

TRY HYPNOSIS FIRST 

NOT LAST? 

" (t) BECAUSE IT WORKS. 

(2) IT WILL SAVE YOU A 

LOT OF MONEY 

BECAUSE YOU WILL GO 

INTO THE RIGHT 

DIRECTION RIGHT 

AWAY. 

(3) rr SAVES YOU TIME- 
NO NEED TO KEEP 

COMING BACK. 

WHAT IS HYPNOSIS? j 

DURING HYPNOSIS 

YOU'RE RELAXED AND 

GIVEN POSITIVE 

SUGGESTIONS. ITS 1 

THAT SIMPLE IN THE 

HANDS OF A TRAINED 

HYPNOTIST, THERE IS 

t. NOTHING MYSTERIOUS 

ABOUT IT. ANYONE WITH 

NORMAL INTELLIGENCE 

CAN BE HYPNOTIZED.. 

YOU ARE ALWAYS IN 

CONTROL 

THE CENTER FOR 

HABIT CONTROL 

128 NEWBERRY 

AVE., 
L1BERTYVILLE, 

ILL. 60048. 

(847)816-4951. 

DAVID E. WOLD 

CHT. 



TIRED OF SMOKING? 

J0IN-THE THOUSANDS UKE 

YOURSRrTllATaUITIN 7 DAYS 

*-:.Wrni'AU NATURAL. 

iSMOKEAWAV. 

GUARANTIED. - 

I-8WWI 1-5930 

EXT. IL 5319-2 



WANTEDI!! 

Ntrd people who art «rbus 

about losing weight. 

Programs trndtr $100. 

Natural Dr. Recommended. 

CALL: 

847/482-1796 



FREE LUXURY BUS RIDE 

TOPOTAWATOM1 

BINGO. 

BRAND NEW 1899 BUS1 

Monday-TuBSday- 

Thurs'day. 
Pick-up 4:15pm at 
Hampton Inn, Gtirnea, 
Ride 10 times and get « 
free package of specials. 
Hollywood Casino, 
Valentines Day 
Sam. PBy St 5 get free 
brunch and S3 back. 
Menominee Casino Hotel 
Over Night February. 6th & 
7th. Pay $100 and get 
. $50 back. 
Call for Information 
(847) 831-1094. 
(847) 473-1263. 



125 



Personals 



115 



Lost & Found 



FOUNp CHOCOLATE 

LAB, mate, green collar, 

' Grayslake area, Saturday 

; ' 2/6/99. Please call (647) 

: . , 543-1744. 

i~ j-OST WALKING CANE in 
i;Wauconda area, between 
.Maple 'and Jewel, Friday, 
' 2/5/99. (847) 526-2753. -' 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(6471223-8161. 



120 


Free 



PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT 
GOVT-POSTAL JOBS 

Now-Hiring For 1999 

. Oh The Job Training 

Start $23 < 800-$35,000/yr. 

for Information & application 

1 -B1 8-589-3736 ext. 71 12 




HEAJLIHY WOMEN 

;■ T^ nmRnsmnD 

$3500,00 Compensation 

Heullhy women, uge 20-33. 

needed to serve us unonymaus 

egg donors. Donors will be 

required to lake medication, 

blood screening and undergo 

minor surgical procedure. We 

. are interested in all ethnic 

backgrounds. Multiple locations 

uviillubtc. If interesied call 

ARR 773-317-73I5 

Seritms Inquiries Only 



WE -DO* NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more information, 
please conlact the Humane 
Society, 



DON'T THROW AWAY 
YOUR OLD COMPUTER 
EQUIPMENT. I will come and 
pick It up for FREE. Call (847) 
566-281 9 after 5;30pm, ^ 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING77 GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways, are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. . (847) 

223-8161.ext.1 40. 



A LOVING -CHOICE Dear 
birth mom, we're Ken and 
Jean, a happily married cou- 
ple with a 5yr. old adopted son 
who can provide a warm, lov- 
ing home for your child. We'd, 
be happy to keep In touch 
through pictures and letters. 
Please call our attorney Sara 
(773) 5090099 or (toll free) 
(877) 509-0099. 

, ADOPTION 

We're Mary and Mark, 

partners In marriage and the 

best of friends. Having a child 

will fulfill our greatest dream. 

We value education, 

have supportive families, 

financial security and 

lots of energy and love. 

We'll gladly help you, tool 

CALL MARY AND MARK 

688-295-1313. 

ADOPTION "AT HOME" 
mom (teacher) and devoted 

dad (professional) desire 
baby to cherish. Adopted 
sister, music, sports/ security, 
unlimited opportunities and 
love. Janet/John 1-800-565- 
5635. 

ADOPTION WANTED 

BABY BROTHER OR 

SISTER. You wont feel lone- 
ly because I'm adopted too. 
Mom and Dad can provide a 
loving and secure home. We" 
have a big house and a big 
yard with lots of toys. We have 
lots of love to give. Mom stays 
at home. Please call 'Tim or 
Kathy. Call collect anytime 
after Spm. 1-847-395-8064, 

ADOPTION WE'RE MARY 

and Mark, partners In mar- 
- riage and the best of friends. 
Having a child will fulfill our 
grealest dream; We value ed- 
ucation, have supportive fa- 
milies, financial, security, and 
lots of energy and love. We'll 
gladly help you, too! CALL 
MARY AND MARK 688-295- 
1313. - 



ARE- YOU TIRED of being. 
FAT? Tried EVERYTHING? 
Lose up to 30 pounds In 30 
days. GUARANTEED. Toll free 
1 -877-81 6-4926.%" 

BEAUTIFUL FOREVER1 

PERMANENT COSMETIC 

MAKE-UP. 

•Eyebrows 

*Eyeline 

- .• . • #Also 
'Electrolysis 
•"{Permanent Hair Removal), 
Snarry (847) 24&-7418. 

ITS TIME TO LOSE 
WEIGHT AND FEEL * 
RIGHT 

With Herba Life. 

Guaranteed results. 

Dr. Approved. 

Independent Distributor. 

(847) 567-1 70S. 

LOOK GREATI 

LOSE WEIGHT! 

' MAKEMONEY1 

(847) 940-9669. 

LOSE WEIGHT NOWI 

We'll pay you to lose up to 

30lbs. In the next 30 dayslt 

All Natural. 

100% guaranteed. 

Call 1 -877-81 6-B028. 



WILLPOWER IN A BOT- 
TLEl Make 30lbs disappear 
fast. Lose fat, keep muscle. 
Gain 'energy. Lose 

weight/lpches immediately. 
100% natural and doctor rec- 
ommended. 1 -800-8 10-SUM. 



140 



Financial 



LOSE WEIGHT .TODAY, 

keep It off. All natural, safe, ef- 
fective program. ' Take the 

struggle out of dieting. $29,95 
& S&H. 800-608-1390. 



METABOLIFE356n. 
Natural diet supplement 
As advertised on local 

TV and radio- 
Independent distributor 
(847) 263-3876. 

PLEASE;^'. HELP US 

ADOPT!/ Musical' mom, athle- . 
tic dad, married 12 years, hop- 
ing to adopt your precious 
baby. We live In an activity- 
filled comfortable home with 2 
lovable mutts In a close-knit 
neighborhood full of children 
(many adopted). Medical, le- 
gal, counseling and court ap- 
proved . living expenses paid. 
Confidential. Please call our 
attorney at (708) 957-6833. 

WE'RE A HAPPILY MAR- 
RIED, .secure, loving couple 
unable to have children. Our 
greatest dream Is to share our 
lives with a child, and we 
would embrace the opportuni- 
ty to adopt the baby that you 
may not be ready for. The 
dreams you have for your 
baby can come true. If you are 
considering en adoption plan 
as an alternative In your preg- 
nancy, please call us. Paul. 
and Denlse 1-888-697-5777 
We can help each other. 



SSSOVERDUE . BILLS!! 
CREDIT PROBLEMS? Con- 
solidate debts.. Same day ap- 
proval. Cut monthly payments 
up lo 50%lit Become debt' 
free. NO APPLICATION FEESI 
1 -800-863-9006 Ext. 900. 
www.help-pay-bilts.com . (SCA 
Network). 

ALL. CASHI RECEIVING 
payments on a mortgage? 
Why wait? Best prices paid na- 
tionwide, plus we pay transfer 
costs. Sell all/part. Purchase 
Equity Investors 1-800-999- 
9892. - 

FINANCIAL RELIEF FOR 
THE TERMINALLY ILL If 
you're living with a terminal ill- 
ness and have a life insurance 
policy, we can give you cash 
for your policy's face value. 
For free Info kit call Enhance 
Lite Benefits t -800-325-81 20. 

MAXED OUT? 

Buried In Debt? 

Behind on your payments? 

Living paycheck to paycheck? 

You're not alone. 

But the good news Is, 

we have a REAL solution 

Debt Crisis Solutions. 

Confidential. 

Call Today (847) 740-9178. 

.Ext. #3. 

ssssssssssssssss 



s 
$ 
s 

S 
$ 

s 

s 
$ 
$ 
$ 
s 
$ 
s 
s 
s 
$ 
s 
s 
$ 

9 
S 



$ 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
% 
s 
s 
s 
$ 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

* (847) 249-5500 1 

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 



INSTANT 
CASH 

We hold the title 

to your car- 
You keep the car, 

(Jet skis, 

motorcycles & 

snowmobiles tool!) 

• Mo Credit Check 
' 15 Mln Approval 



219 



Help Warned 
- Pan-Time 



GREAT S$'s 

Flexible Hours 

Setting Appointments. 

Call for information 

(847) 940-9689. 



.n 



i 



! 




--•-rtT-f a^ntK^V"*'* »■ » ■ 



-> ... .■..■■iiny^u 



C14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



Februarys, 1999 



I 

! 






I 



, 


















»!< 



1 1 ? 






. 



.}•■, 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



N1CASA 

PART-TIME 

ACCOUNTING 

SELF-STARTER 
EXPERIENCED IN 

ACCOUNT 

RECONCILIATION 

BUDGET PREPARATION 

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS 

HOURS FLEXIBLE 
15-20 PER WEEK 

SEND RESUME TO: 
. LINDA SNELTEN 

C/O N1CASA 

319797 N. FISH LAKE RD 
ROUND LAKE.IL 60073 




SECRETARY II 

Adult & Community 
. Education 
Part-Time 

THIS GRANT-FUNDED' 
position b responsible for 
providing secretarial support And 
ec ling as a liaison between 
departments and project stall, 
maintaining tha olfiee, project 
lies and access data base, 
A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA or. 
CED. 35 wpm and proficiency In 
Microsoft Office are required. 
SUBMIT A COMPLETE 
application to Human Resources 
by February 23. 1999. 
FOR MORE INFORMATION, 
please contact Human Resources 
(847)513-2063 and 
TDD* (847) 223-5615. 
COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY ' 
19351 W. Washington St. 
Grayslake. IL 60030-1 198 
EOE/AA/m/f/d/v 




Locations all over Lake County 

Please call 

(b47) 573-0252 



Part Time p.m. positions 

Available Monday-Friday, 

Excellent salary 

Supervise school-age children in: 

•OUTSIDE PLAY 

•INDOOR ACnVTTIES 

•ARTS 6c CRAFTS 

•COOPERATIVE GAMES 

•FULL TIME BILLING 

COLLECTIONS PERSON 

ALSO NEEDED 







Is your pet 
a star? 

Send us a picture and 

maybe your pet will be the 

next 

PET OF 
THE WEEK! 



DELIVERY 



Want to earn up to $200 per 
week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for 

adult, independent personnel for 

newspaper delivery in the Lake 

County area. 2-3 hour routes 

available between the hours of 

2am & 6am, Monday thru 

Friday; 2am-7am, Saturdays, 

Sundays and Holidays. - 

For more information call... 
(847) 427-4333 



raphic 
'esigner 



We're looking for a 
"graphic designer" to join our team. 

Do you have experience with 

< computers and graphic design 

programs? If you do, 

(hen we can teach you the 

rest in this entry level position. 

[Send your resume to NEAL TUCKER at: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
or fax to 223-8810. 



s 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Cupid d>J& 
was (f(0 M8k£ 
here. 

Chock out 

Cupid's 

Connections 

In this weok'a 

paper) 



It 





NEEDED IN 
NAIL SALON 

T>owntoYVn Grayslake* 

Call Mary at 

(647)543-9300 







Country Squire 
!%£Staurant df 

'Banquets 
• F/PT Waitstaff 

Fine dining & banquet 
positions available. 

Experience helpful, but 
_ will consider all 
motivated applicants. 

• Part Time Banquet 

Bartender. Positions 

Apply in person Tucs.-Sun. 
Rtcs. 120 & 45 ■• Grayslake 
(847)223-0121 - 



Maintenance/ 
Building 



The Wnuconda Park District 

Is seeking on Indiv. to perform 

related janitorial functions 

and maintain its facilities 

In proper housekeeping 

condition. U.S. diploma or 

equivalent req*d. Min. 1 yr. 

■ Exp In janitorial services 
desired.' 30 hours per week. 

Apply at Wauconda Park Diit. 

600 N. Main St, Wauconda 

byFeb.24 



Pampered Chef 

needs more consultants 

to demonstrate quality 

kitchen tools at homo 

kitchen shows. 

Average $15/$20 

hour commission. 

No experience necessary. 

Call Linda 
(847)249-1015 



Social Services 



Great second Jobl 

On-call, overnight counselor 

needed for domestic 

violence program. 

Send resume to 

Phyllis A. DeMott 

A Safe Place 

P0 Box 1067 

Waukegan, 0.60079. EOE 



RETIREES!!! 

Are you wining to help 
high school students 

@ learn a trade or vocation 
_ In your spare time? The 
Lake County High Schools 
Technology Campus in 
Grayslake Is looking lor 
substitute teachers to 
work in hands-on learning 
environments, flexible 
hours. $75.00 per day, ' 
$80.00 after 10 days. 
Must have Bachelors 
degree. Regular teaching 
certificate not required. 

For more Info. 

Call Jeff Brlerton 

(847)223-6681x7201 



N1CASA 

has a pare time position 

(20 hours per week) for a 

qualified data entry clerk 

who is derail minded, a 

self-starrer and has the 

ability to communicate and 

work well with others. 
Requirements: Excellent 

fceyboarding skills, and 
- 10 key pad experience. 

Send or fax resume ro; 

NICASA 

, c/o Jane Sage 
31979 N. Fish lake Road 

Round take, IL 60073 
. FXr 847-546-6760 
EOE 



Telemarketing/Part-Time 



r chance to 

ccsh in on your free time. J* 

Lakeland Newspapers is now accepting anplicatiansjor ^ 
pan rim* telipHone sates, & work f mm our Grayslake office. .J 

No experience necessary (but u plus). \. 

RETIREES ^ 

COLLEGE STUDENTS, S 

HOUSEWIVES > 

{ Must enjoy talking to people. Hourly wage plus bimusS^ 

Average $10-515 per hour or more, y 

HOURS: v> 

Afon.-TTiwrc. 5:00p.nt. • 8:30p.m. % 
Day Hours Sat. 9:00am-2:00pm 



Calling anyone who 
needs extra moneyll! J 

We are looking for highly 

eneijrtfc Individuals to work In * 

f jsI peed friendly environment 

preparing newspapers for delivery. 

Thursday from 230 a.m. to 7 a.m. 

Craytuke/Round Lake area. 

This fob will give you plenty of time I 

to gel to a full lime job, home before 

the Uds get off to school, or hive 

the rest of Ihe day to yourself! No 

special skills needed, students and 

retirees are welcome! Applicant 

must be physically able to lift 

. small bundles of paper. 

Oil Diane for tnlervtewll 
(M7)740-ttl5 



Part time - 
evening hours for busy 

CHIROPRACTIC 
OFFICE 

Is looking for a motivated 

self surter, high energy, 

enthusiastic Individual to 

do office work, light 

filing, phones, etc 

Must have computer 

experience and great 

people skills. Professional 

atmosphere. $7/hr. 

Please call Dr. Bouma 

(847) 543-10S5 



£ For Interview Call 
y Dick (after Noon) 
^ Lakeland Newspaper, 
> (847) 740-4035 

"Taaaaaaa 




Johnsburg 
High School 

Kitchen Dishwasher 

Wanted. 

School days only. 

10:45 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

Please apply in person 

at Johnsburg High 

School. 
2002 West-Ringwood 
■Road, Johnsburg, IL 
or call Barb at • 

815-38S-9233 



LET'S TALK 






Do you like to earn money, but 

not work long hours? Do you 

enjoy talking on the phone? 

Then give me a call. Excellent 

sales opportunities are available 

jn Lakeland's Classified Sales 

Dept. Telemarketing 

experience preferred 

but not required. 

Send resume or request 
for application to: 

Attn: M. Combs 
Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

or Fax 



(847) 223-8810 ] 




LAUNDROMAT 
ATTENDANTS 

Mature individuals for 
permanent, part time 
positions. Some evening & 
weekend hours necessary. 

• Paid Training 

• Flexible Hours 

• Gean, Friendly Environment | 
Paid Holidays 

Apply in Person 

DRY DOCK 
LAUNDROMAT 

509 Washington St. 

Ingleslde, IL 

847-587-5445 

(Behind Dog N Suds) 



Medical X-Ra y 

Receptionist 

Part Time 

Deerpoth Medical Associates, a 
multi-specialty physicians 
group, is now hiring a port time 
Medical X-Ray Receptionist 
for our Lake Bluff office. The 
chosen candidate will be 
responsible for answering 
phones, registering patients, 
scheduling appointments, and 
upkeep or records. Our ideal 
candidate will have exceptional 
communication , customer 
service, and detailed oriented - 
skills and have previous 
medical office experience. Your 
dedication and hard work will 
be rewarded with competitive 
compensation. For confidential 
consideration send/fax resumes 
to 7 1 Waukegan Rd. Ste, 900, 
Lake Bluff, I L 60044/ fax: 
(847) 295-1547. EOE 



219 



Help Warned 
Part-Time 



LOCATED 30 J H. 

CKDAJUAKIROAD 

KlTTy-COBHKB FROM 

ROUND LAKITRA1H 

STATIOM. 

HIIP MIMDBD 

THRUttKRDAVA 

1-3 HOUR/ A D Ay. 

TOIHQUIRstCAlL* 

740-1037 




y**s 



Permanent 
Port-Time 

Work tl*>*. ertnlnsii 

and/or wcekendi from 

your home to earn 

antral Income. 

Weekly paycheck to 

schedule pickup* of 

donn«J on • for well 

known charitable . 

orsjsinhraitlon. 

Min 4-6/wrek 

For more Info, call 

630-515-5766 



Uw i 



m ill hm 



Johnsburg School 

. District #12 

Needs substitute 

kitchen workers. 

School days only. 

Hours vary between 

8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Depending on job. 

Please call Barb Moore 

at Johnsburg High 

School to apply. 

815-385-9233 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



1000 ENVELOPES =$4000 
AT HOMEI Receive $4 for 
every envelope you stuff with 
our sales materials. Gur- 
anteed. Free Info, 24hr. 
recording. (310) 851-2152. 
(SCA Network). 

AIM HIGH FIND your future 
with the Air Forcel Training, 
travel, educational assistance 
and financial security. Plus en- 
listment bonuses up tb 
$9,000 to those -who qualify. 
Afja requirement 17-27. For a 
free Information packet, call 1- 
800-423-USAF or visit 
www.airforce.com 

ANYONE CAN DO THIS! 

Earn $800-S5,000 per month 

. Taking Customer Service 

Calls at home. 

Full or Part-Time. 

Call 1-88B-395-0743. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers ' you may 
receive n misleading state- 
ment from another firm 're- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop' 
er credit to your account 
all payments for -your Lake 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made. as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 288 

30 8, Whitney St. 

Qrayalolce, IL 00030-0268 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



AVON PRQDUCTS- 

START a homebased busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (88B) 561 -AVON. 



CRST INTERNATIONAL A 
World of Opportunities: EX- 
PERIENCED DRIVERS - 'Solo 
& team divisions 'Sign on 
bonus up to $2,000 *660 1999 
International Conventional 
'Immediate Insurance avail. 
abla. INDEPENDENT CON- 
TRACTORS *Sofo and team 
divisions 'Regional or long- 
haul 'Lease/Purchase. Call 
Recruiting @ 800-553-2778 
www.crs1.com 



DRIVER . ■ ATTENTION: 
STAY CLOSE TO HOME AND 
GET THE MILES YOU NEED. 
Regional rung, home weekly. 
Experienced drivers and 
owner operators needed. Bur- 
lington Motor Carriers 800- 
5646262. 

DRIVER - INEXPERI- 
ENCED? Ask about our com- 
pany sponsored training. Wo 
have raised pay for ALL our 
drivers, and we offer top con- 
ventional equipment. U.S. Ex- 
press 688-936-3338. 



DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Lines Refrigerated Haul- 
ing '$1,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
■Solo drivers start up to 33c 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-800-33B-6428. 

DRIVERS - NO oxp/No prob- 
lem. No cost CDL training if 
qualified. $30,000 a year + 
benefits. 600-553-1044, 

DRIVERS • OWNER Ops 
Feel Like your In Neutral? No 
Canada, NYC or NE, Min. 
23yr. with 1yr. OTR CDL With 
Hazmat Paschall Truck Unos 
600-848-0405. ' 

DRIVERS AND TEAMS: 
Starting pay up to 37c/mife. As- 
signed Freightllner conven- 
tional. Improved speed 
stance, excellent miles, lime 
homo every 7-10 days In most 
areas and more. Experienced 
drivers call Heartland Express 
loll-froe 1-87-PRO-DRIVE. 
Owner Operators ask about 
88C/mlle. Call 1-8-PROFIT- 
PRO. E.O.E. 

DRIVERS ARE -YOU looking 
to make a change? Look no 
further. G.F. Lacaeyse Trans- 
port has the miles, the equip- 
ment and the experience to 
make you successful. Call 800- 
645-3748. |i 

DRIVERS MIDWEST 
BASED terminal hiring com- 
pany drivers. Full benefits, 
comp pay and miles. Flexible 
homo time. We have openings 
for driving school graduates. 
600-6439817. 

DRIVERS: OWNER OP- 
ERATORS and temporary 
company drivers for hauling 
manufactured products.- New 
compensation package. 3* 
months experience. North 
American Van Lines 800-348- 
2147, Dept. ILS. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY 
Work one weekend a month 
and two weeks a year and re- 
1 celve 100% college tuition, the 
Montgomery Q.I. Bill and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify for a cash enlist- 
ment bonus; Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-BOO-OK-GUARD. 

EASY WORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-51,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. - 

For free information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&j Enterprises 

Mailing Services, inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleslde, 111. 60041.- 

GET PAID S15-S30 per 
hour processing ' Insurance 
claims for local doctors office. 
Complete training provided. 
Computer and modem re- 
quired. Call 800/942-8141 
EXT. 82. 



GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

' We're looking for a 

"graphic designer* to join our 

team. Do you have experience 

with computers and graphic 

design programs? If you do, 

then we can teach you the 

rest 

in this entry level position. 

Send your resume to: 

Neal Tucker , 

Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake, III. 60030. 

Or fax to: (847) 223-8810.. 

^■""""""""""""""""""""■■■»" 1 ""»"»"01»»»»»»SlSSl^il»»»»»»»»»»»»»^l»S»«ilSSl»^»^ 

HELP WANTED SEMI 
DUMP DRIVER, 5yrs. experi- 
ence, (847) 587-4251. 

MEDICAL BILLING NA- 
TIONWIDE Company seek- 
ing billets. PC reaqulred, no 
experience necessary. Poten- 
tial earnings ol $31,500+ in- 
vestment required. Call 800- 
524-1478. ' 

NATIONAL GLAMOUR 

COMPANY seeks sales per- 
sons, photographers, make- 
up artists for extensive travel. 
Vehicle . required. SALARYI 
BENEFITSI COMMISSIONS! 
EXPENSES PAIDI 1-800-800- 
4948 ext. 206. www.sty- 
leshots.com 



PET CAREI ENERGETIC 

dependable person, various 
duilos Involving pets. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends and holidays. Call only 
between 10am-5pm, Monday- 
"day. Shel-Ray Pet Shalel 
(414) B57-2183. 



I 



■».:• -V . 



SnBSowS " * 






February 12, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C1 5 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



REPORTER Lakeland News- 
papers has an opening for. an 
entry level reporter on Its ex- 
panding editorial staff. Experi- 
ence tn writing and some pho- 
tography Is helpful. Will handle 
a variety of, writing assign- 
ments and work- on a varied. 
flexible schedule. You must be 
able to work under deadline 
situations. If you have the 
basic skills wo need, this may 
be your" chanco for a career 
start. Come on board with us 
and wall teach you tho rest, 
Please fax resumes to: Neat 
Tucker, Executive Editor, 
(647) 223-081 o or mall to: 30 
S, Whitney St., Graysfako, III. 
, 6003,0... ..,„, 

WEIGHT LOSS! 

EARN EXTRA 

INCOME PT/FTl 

No Experience 

Necessary! 

We'll pay you to Loso up 

to 30lbs. in 30 days, 

Coll 1-800-600-0343 
oxt . 2465. 



TOOL^ 
DIE MAKER 

Immed Openings - Iowa. 
World da» automotive 
j stamping facility seeks F/T 
]TooJ t Die Makers w/4+ yrs 
exp to be responsible for 
the foil owing: 

* Operation of a variety of 
machine tools, lathes, 
milling machines, drill 
presses, grinders, etc 

' Troiibleshoot progressive 
&. transfer tooling In a 
large press shop 

* Verify conformance of 
machined or repaired 
dies to produce parts to 
specs. Cxc wage &. bnft 
pkg Including profit 
share, 401 K w/company 
match &. health Insurance' 

! Letter of application/resume! 

Arils HR. 

Williamsburg Mfg 

100 Park Ave . 

HO Box 808 

Williamsburg, IA5236 1 



jWECA STORt 



: *rrri»NTS REC EIVABLE CLERK- Full-Tlmr, 8-5, auto dealer 
exp. prtf. ADP Exp. helpful, fax resume lo 847-223-5985 

MAINTENANCE - seeking experienced person for maintenance 
tlepL Full-time or part-lime available. Great position for retiree. 
Call 847-223-8651; ext. 3132. 



TrTTri 





The following schools need 
substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 
names listed below for further Information.'. 



.its- - ** 



AdialE: Stevenson High School District #125 
Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

Contact: Personnel - . (847) 634-4000 

Aptaklslc - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Welland Rd, BulTalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak. (847) 634-5338 

Dig Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Hwy 12, Ingbide, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buchner . . , ; (847) 587-6800 

Day School / Northbrook 

32 10 Dundee Road, Northbrook IL 60062 

Contact: Ede Snyder. (847) 205-0274 

Decrileld School District #109 
517 Deerfield Rd. Deerficld, IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Antioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pat Reed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake School District #46 
450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, !L 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry x-l 100 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL6OO6I 

Contact: Shari Kecna. (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools . 

95W. Deerpalh, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District #115 

1285 North McKlnlcy Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Antrim x-l 18 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #4 1 

131 McKinley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact:'my. (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School DIst. #187 

2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong. y. (847) 689-8150 

Nortliern Suburban Special Education District 

760 Red Oak Lane, -Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill Charts (847) 831-510 

Old School. Montessori 

144 Commerce Drive, Grayslake, IL60030 

Contact: Marilyn . .-. . .- (847) 223-9606 

Waukegan Public Schools District #60 

1201 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel. . . . (847) 360-5404 

Woodland School District #50 

17370-Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Cow/rrW/Mlcheile - • • (847)856-3605 

Young at Heart Center 

610 Peterson Road, Ubertyvllle, IL 60048 

COtitttct-Uvi or Leslie (847)-367-6ll0 



220 



Help Wartled 
Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



CUSTOmER SERVICE/ 

OFFICE COORDINATOR 

Growing manufacturing 

co. is looking for a 

motivated Individual that 

. Is customer driven! 

: Must have some 

computer skills & the 

desire to learn. Very 

competitive wages, 

great benefits & pleasant 

work environment. 

Send resume to; 

Merer Machine- 

& Equipment 

351 nlllnSL 

Antioch, 0. 60002 

(647)7,95-2970 

Fix (8 47)3 95-2 972 



YOU CHOOSE: 

New E tubes Spuiaiist or 

Customrr Sr nice Rf prtKnlatlre 

WesTfRttnilllngfor 

Ml - Riftfit now 

Mofftn, 

An exettkut benefit package 

& opportu ruty for carter 

adranctratnl bawd on , 

ptrformaiKf. 

To qualify; 

You should hare 1 strong serrfce 
aptitude, a nigh lerd of energy, 
solid communication ikllb & 
probtem wiring abilities. 

For coosidenooa 

Furwurueto 
815-W7-99M 






Factory 

GENERAL FACTORY 
$8.08-$8.41 to Start 

Dependable, full-time employee) 
wanted for our 2nd shift 
(2pm-10pm| and 3rd shift 
|I0pn>6am). No experience 
necessary, on (he fob training 
provided. The selected indi- 
viduals «/l) possess basic math 
and reading skills. In return, 
wc offer a competitive pay 
and benefit pack&ga. 

Applications accepted 
Monday thru Friday from 
9am until 2pm. Apply In 
person only. 

PEERLESS OF 

AMERICA, INC. 
15773 W. Aptokiste Road - 
Line a Irish I re, IL 
EOE 



BECONCHJA3ION SPECIALIST 

, Groat Lakes Credit Union, located near 

j Waukegan, IL, has ah excellent opportunity in bur j 

" Accounting Dept.. for a Reconciliation Sp&clalist. ' 

This person will reconcile mortgage G/L's, 

corporate checks, arid other G/L's as assigned. 

This person must hava at least 2 years basic 

accounting experience, excel knowledge, and 

good communication skills. To. apply, fax resume 

to 847-887-8798 or e-mail jenc@glcu.org. 

Call our JOB HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 to find 

out more! 

EOE 



Warehouse 



Weekends Are 
Play Time. 




PACKAGE HANDLERS 



Steady, Part-Time Jobs 

$8.50-$9,50/Hour 



REPORTER 



I Lakeland Newspapers has an opening fori 
an entry level reporter on its expanding 
editorial staff. Experience in writing and 
some photography Is helpful. Will handle a 
variety of writing assignments and work onl 
a varied, flexible schedule. You must be able 
to work under deadline situations. If you 
have the basic skills we need, this may be 
your chance for a career start. Come on | 
board with us and well teach you the rest. 
Please fax resumes to: 
Neal Tucker 
Executive Editor 
(847)223-8810 
or, mail to: 30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



>v*rv 



Weekends & Holidays Off 
.'Must be 17 Years or Older 
• Various Shifts at Each Location 
Great Benefits (Medical/Life, . 
401 K & Paid Vacations) 

PALATINE 

(Hicks & Rand Roads) 
. Sunrisa Shift • 3am-8am 
. Twilight Shift • 5pm-1 0pm 

' : - - ' "• 

For Palatine jobs call . 
Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm: , 

847-705-6025 

For Northbrook jobs call 
Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm: 

847-480-6714 



Consistent Work Schedule 

• Annual Raises 

PACE Bus Transportation 

• 3-1/2 to 5 hour shifts 



NORTHBROOK . 
(2525 Shermer Road) 
Sunrise Shift • 3am-8am , 
Twilight Shltt • 5pm-10pm 



m 



wi> 



""TIT" 

NJr 




RosJautint 
Great Pay and 
Terrific Benefits! 

7r«VBage»Vict£>ry Lakes . 
has ewotjng opportunities for 

dcpcndifcte ndMdLoH lo 

serve or senior denlde in 

our upscale, ornate 

restaurant 
PTPREPA5ST 
Al least I your prep cxp 
needed for BewUc day & 
evening shifts. Bcsporetie ■ 
for preparing da*/ menu & 

mainDining a sarrtary 

department RJ beneiu 

package available if you work 

at least 40 hours in a 

two-v^ek period - Paid 

vacations and 

hotdays, rnsdcaJ and cental 

plans, discounts on Victory 

r-Vsnorul HcsprtaJ services, 

company sponsored pension 

pun. tax- shattered annuities. 

and MUCH MORE Please 

apply in person between 

?JfJarn-7O0pm MorvSun at 

the Corrtiriing Care Centcc 

I OSS Grand Avenue fjust 

east of Deep Late Rood), 

Lixfcrihur5t.IL 

(847)3564551, 

Fax(847)35M599. 

eog 



H M 



j Clerical 

Pitney Bowes Manage- 
ment Services is a 
rapidly growing Fortune 
500 company that has 
Immediate opportunities. 
We are a leader In 
support services seeking 
individuals for the 
following positions: 

• Drivers 

• Machine Operators 
(we will train on our 
specific equip.) 

• Entry Level Geri 
Staff 

We offer competitive 
salaries, flexible benefit 
plans and the 
opportunity to grow 
with a company that. can 
offer you a career. If 
you're customer service j 
oriented, a self starter 
with a strong desire to 
succeed, contact us for ; 
more information. 
Interviews will be 
conducted in the Long 
Grove Area, 

Please send/fax resume to'; 
P.B.M.S.-Recruiter, 225 
W. Wacker, Suite 800, 
Chicago, IL 60606. 
Fax:(312)236-7741. 
EOE 




Positions! 






, p&rsizmozsssn 



CABtmax 



Qualify • Integrity * Low Price 

Relax. It's Car-Max. 



CarMax, Th* Auto Suparitor*, pIon««r«d the no haggling, no negotiating UMoVcar 
superstore format that hai revolutionized the Way America buys can. We art currently 
seeking full and part-time Sole i Comultanti at our new Kenoiha Auto Mall. Located 
on 1-94 and Highway 50, we sell both new and used can'. 

CarMax offer*! 

• Great earning potential • Senior Sales Consultants typically earn an average 
of $3.5-$7.5K per month In commission. (Commission-based earnings of 
full-time top-performer j with at lea it one year of continuous service,] Regular 

. fulkime Sates Consultants who have been employed at least one year typically 
earn between S2-$3K per monlh in commissions. 

• Excellent retail hours -We are closed on Sundays. 

• Excellent benefits including employee discounts, stock purchase plan, and tuition 
reimbursement. Full-lime associates receive health care, denial, life and paid 
vacation. 

• Extensive training program. Previous aulomolive experience no! nocessory. 

CarMax ii xeaklngi 

• Soles professionals with high energy, excellent communication skills, who 
are team players. (Full & port-lime positions available) 

• Previous retail sales experience a plus. 

We also hava opening* for the fallowing position*: 
Customer Assistance Representatives 
Auto Technicians 
Auto Porters ^ 

800 9C ARM 



Collection 

Make The Most 
Of Your Nights! 

GOLLECTIONS 

Rsrt-Time Nights • 
$9.50/hr 
Yo u can dress casual, . 
enjoy your Job, and cam 
grea t money while you're 
at it That's the Idncf of 
opportunity that you'll ' 
find at PNC Mortgage. In 
thlsposition you'll work 
M-Tnur from 5-10pm and 
Sat morning from 9-3pm, 
Best of all, you'll earn 
$9^0/ hour and wo provide 
the training. If vou nave 
great phone skills and few 
hours to spare each week, 
we should talk. 
Candidates should also 
have a US diploma or 
equivalent, solid PC skills 
and 1 year of general 
office experience to per- 
form past due collections 
and clerical support 
Strong attention to detail 
Is important. 

For Immediate consideration, 

. send or fax a resume lo: 

PNC Mortgage 

75 North Fairway Drive 
DeptBP/CV 

•Vernon Hills, IL 60061. 

FAX (M7) 549-2568. 

We are art equal 

opportunity/affirmative 

aclion/drug-free employer 

M/F/D/V. 

PNC MORTGAGE 



v. 




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-«-»vTf -" * lyr-r^-—''— ' " L ' i ■ *' out* * / ? n . ■ . ■. ■• ! 



C 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 12, 1999 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Ftill-Timu 



220 



Help Wiuued 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



EXPERIENCED F/T 
PAINTERS NEEDED 

for 
Altmann Drywall 

& Painting 

Located In Wauconda 

Must have resume & 

references. 40 IK avail. 

Call 
(847) 526-82 



Warehouse 
Positions 

30 People Needed 

For Supervisor & 

LightAssemble 

847-566-3460 

Fax 847-566-3196 



POSTAL JOBS 

to$18.35/HR 

INC. BENEFITS 
NO EXPERIENCE. 

FOR APP. 

AND EXAM INFO, 

CALL 1-800-813-3585 

EXT 2406 

8AM-9PM 

7 DAYS fds, Inc 






PRfSOJOOTTEACHHS 
AND! 

Caring teachers for 
toddler/parent drop-In 

program at Family 
Network, Highland Park. 
Mornings, 2, 3,'or 5 days: 
Experience or EC 
| training preferred. 
(847)433-0377. 



SALES-IN HOM 

INVISIBLE FENCE 
PET CONTAINMENT 



m 



lOs; 



HVAC SERVICE TECH 

Immed Openings. 
Seml-relire, sunny South. 

Resume: 
Winkler Hearing 6 
Air Conditioning 
PO Box 6029 WSB 
Gainesville, 6A 30504 
Fax 770-287-1348 
Call 770-532-0731 






PRINTING 



Press Operator exp'd. 

AM Mulll Equipment. Color 

Experience desired. 

Full Time Top Pay 

+ Benefit] 

Opportunity for 

advancements. 

- N/NW suburbs. 

Call David 

(847} 634-1260 



Medical Records Clerk 

Large physicians' office ii seek- 
ing a Medical Record i Clerk. 
Ideal candidates will posse jj past 
filing experience preferably in a 
Medicnl Facility and are detailed 
oriented. Send/fax resumes to: 
Deerpalh Medical Assoc.. 
Ann: II. R, 71 WaukeganRd. 
Sle. 900, Lake Bluff. IL 60044 
Fax: (347) 295-1547 or coll 
(847) 533-8080 EOE 



Immediate 

opening. for a 

Legal Secretary 

for FOX LAKE 

LAW Office; 

competitive 

benefits 

contact Mary @ 

847-587-2551 



V 



Business/Operations Manager 

Directs finance office In areas of financial 
management, reporting and internal control systems. 
Manages annual budgeting process, monitors revenue/ 
expenditures, forecasts for all agency activities, pro- 
grams/contracts and grants. Prepares financial reports, 
fiscal/contract liaison to government contract officials 
and maintenance of facility. 3-5 years experience, 
accounting degree preferred. Full time with benefits. 
Please send resume to: YWCA 2133 Belvldere Rd. 
SWaukegan.IL 60085 847-662-4247 EO.E 



3 



^ jMHuiiiKUiui mi" in " "i"""" LJjjj 



tlMIMIMI ' ..---— -. . . .. _ 

FANTASTIC OPPCWTUNTTY FOR SALES PROffiSSIONALS 

♦ 20-YEAR STRONG COMPAtfi ♦ BASED N NORTHERN IUJN0B 

♦ IMPECCABLE REPUTATION IN THE HOME IMPROVEMENT INDUSTRY 

♦ WE TRAIN YOU - PROVIDE PRIONS. SUPPUES AND BJU-TIME SUPPORT 

♦ WE SUPPLY Qm QUAURED LEADS - MJN1MUM 12 PER WEEK 

♦ UNIQUE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES - AVERAGE 33% CLOSE RATIO 

♦ FULL COMPANY BENEHT PACKAGE AVAILABLE 

♦ SALARY - DRAW STARTS IMMEDIATELY 

♦ BONUSES WHILE TRAINING 

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A POSITION YOU CAN GROW WTTH AND 
ARE TIRED OF THE TYPICAL SALES POUOES-WE ARE THE CHANGE 
YOU'RE LOOKING FOR 

CALL OR FAX TODAY! 

ASK FOR PETE 

PHONE 7 AM TO 7 PM (M7) 658-OOJI 

FAX 24 HOURS A DAY {8473 638-9686 



jiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii mini iiiiiiiiiiiinuiiiiiiiiiin iitniiMiinmriiiiniiiiiiiii?. 



" 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 




A VO 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



J 




< COLLECTION MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITY! 
Great L%kes CncdiT Union, a S500 MlttiON 
fj liNAwctAt Institution In Gurnee, IL, Is lookiNC, Ior a 
tj3 dyNAMlc iNdlviduAl to liEAd our coIIectIon IunciIon. 

M TltiS PERSON MUST llAVE dlRECT COllECTiON MANAGEMENT 
EXp. IN A fiNANClAl INSTITUTION, bE fAMlliAR WITH CON- 
SUMER ANd M0RTC,AC,E lENdiNf, PRACTICES, ANd pROVEN 
ktsowkdqE oi COllECTiON PRACTICES ANd pROCEduRES. 

Fax resume to 847-887-8798 or e-ma!1 

jENC@qlcu.ORq. VislT our wtb sUe at www.qlcu.ORq. 5 

CaII our JOB HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 g 

LTO flNd OUT more! a 

EOE r 




OPPORTUNITIES 



■ 




To place your medical 
opportunity here, call Paula 

o r Ross at 847 -223- 8 1 61 




NIGHT 
AIDE 



Immediate 
Part Time 
positions 

available in our 

Lake Zurich 

facility. 

For D/D Women. 

Experience not 
required. 

Willing to train. 

9 p.m. - 6 a.m. 



Contact Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

*V 847-438-5050 ^ 



$MRP 

Immediate full time posi- 
tion available in our 

Lake 7jirich Intermediate 
Care Facility. Will be 

responsible for planning, 

developing, and supervis- 
ing case management 
activities for MR/DD 
women. Bachelor's 
Degree and one year 

experience with MR/DD 
population required. 

Contact Call Becker 
Mount Saint Joseph. 
. Lake Zurich 
(€47) 43B-5C5C 



1 



RN'S/LPN'S 



TIRED OF 
SKILLED CARE 

NOW IS YOUR CHANCE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

HILLCREST NURSING 
CENTER 

INTERMEDIATE 
CARE NURSING 

CALL TODAY 
SALLY LEMAR 

(847)546-5300 

1740 N CIRCUIT DRIVE 
ROUND LAKE BEACH, IL 



Hilar 
$ 15-$35 PER HOUR 

Easy medical billing. 

Full training. 

Computer required. 

1-800-259-6661 

ext.222 



■sj 




RN/LPN 



113 bed skilled 

nursing facility needs 

PT/FT nurse for days 

or PM's. Previous 

LTC exp. helpful. 

Musi be team player 

and be detail oriented. 

Comprehensive benefits 

+ training package. 

Apply in person or 

fax resume to: 

Care Centre of 

Wauconda 

176 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda, IL « 

847-526-5551 

Fax 847-526-0807 



Health Cora 

NURSING ASSISTANTS 
Home Health 

Victory Memorial Hospital has 
positions with flexible daytime 
hours available (with minimal 
weekends) (or Home Hoalih 
Care Nursing Assistants. To 
quality you must be certified 
and have your own transporta- 
tion. Previous home health 
experience Is preferred. 
We provide a competitive 
salary. Please apply in person 
or send your resume to: 

Human Resources 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukogan, IL 60085 

Ph: 847-350-4170 

FAX: B47-360-4230 

Equal opportunity employer nvl 



■■■■■■■■■I 



Health care 

CNAs 

Make a Difference 

in our Residents' Lives 

Full-time and part-time opportunities 

available for caring and compassionate 

people to work In our 120-bed long-term 

care facility. Must be certified In Illinois 

or close to completion, Competitive 

pay and complete benefits package 

available for full AND part time with 

medical/dental benefits starting almost 

Immediately. Please apply In person at: 



Victory Lakes 
^Continuing Care Center 

1055 East Grand Avenue . 
Undenhurst, IL 60046 ' 
Ph: 847-356-4551 
eoem/f/d/v 




DIRECT 
CARE 

Direct Care Workers 
for MR/DD women 
in residential setting. 
All shifts available. 

Full Time or 

Part Time. We are 

committed to quality 

residential care. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



Do-you love 

dogs, enjoy being 

ulslilc & Imve great 

stiles skills? 

Enthusiastic 

jippllcnnts wanted 

for growing company. 

Commission 

& benefits. 

Coll 

800-909-HIRE 



I 




Receptionist/ 
GriicTiif Office 



Seeking ptounr. 

orpnljcd imllvi Juil to 

issiit In iiiy to iby 

office functions 
Including answering 

phono, filing & 
tracking jobs as well 
as other misc. tasks. 
Company offers full 

benefits package. 

Please all Debbie @ 

847-52&-O-10O to set up 

a confidential Interview 

or fax resume to 

847-526-0543 



1 



AMOCO/SPLIT SECOND 

is on the move 

Come join our fast growing 

convenience retailing concept. 

Great full & part time opportunities. 

Up to $1 an hour plus benefits. 

looking for deli people, cashiers, leads 

& assistant managers for our new 

Grayslake Location 

{corner of Rt 45 & 120) 

Call 800-884-2910 



r- 

i. . 

E 
I 



M 
I 



COLLECTORS! 

Great Lakes Credit Union has career 

opportunities available for successful Collectors 

In our Gurnee location. This person will be 

collecting on past due accounts, such as 

Visa's, auto loans and mortgage loans. Ideal 

candidate will have 1 year collection exp. In a 

financial institution, familiar with collection 

policy and procedures, and knowledge of laws 

concerning repossessions, To apply, fax resume 

to 847-887-8798 or e-mail Jenc@glcu.org. Call 

our JOB HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 

to find out morel EOE 



lULTT.l 



I .. . 



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C-r- 



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• HAIRDRESSER / BARBERS WANTED • 

Part time & Full time work 
Established northshore salon. 



ff 




is 



'Full Time benefits 
'Excellent work environment 
'Upscale salon 

Apply in person 

Mon-Fr) 8ct-Bp / Sat. 8a - 5p 

Send or Fax resume to: 847-336-2033 

Attn: Rao Taylor 

Gold Coast Salon & Day Spa 

422 N. Green Bay Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 600S5 

Phone (847) 336-2012 





OUTBOUND CfllL CENTER-SflLES SUPERVISORS 

, Wc are in search of individuals for various shifts. 
iMiist liave management experienced 
OUTBOUND CflUCENTER-SflLES REPS 

We are"searching for individuals for various shifts. 

Must be able to communicate effectively over the telephone! 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



1 
"1 



2 

I 

I 



-1 



WE OFFER: 

• Aggressive Compensation Plan 

• Six-Month Salary Review 

• Paid Training Program 

• Flexible Hours 

• Medical, Dental & Life Insurance 

• Tuition Reimbursement 

• Generous 401K Salary Savings Prograrr 

• Employee Recognition Awards 

Please forward all inquires to: 




CHCAGOLAND'5 PREMIER INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER 



30 S. Whitney Street, Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Fax to: skw at (847) 223-8810 

; or e-mail: skw@us-netdlrect.com 






POSTAL JOBS lo $lB.3S/br 

WILDLIFE JOBS to 

t21.60/lir 

[ric.Bfti. No Exp. nee. for 

App A exam Info. 

Toll Free 

1-877-293-1179 xllG 

M-S lOam-flptn EST - CCFS 




DRIVERS 

SEVERAL POSITIONS 

AT 2 LOCATIONS \tn. llUCl 

(WAUKEGAN k ELK GROVE) 

CDLA&BW/IIAZMATTit 

AIRBRAKES 

VEHICLE INSPECTOR 
FULLTIME POSITION 
DEPENDABLE 

APPLY IN PERSON 

K&R 

TRANSPORTATION 

3059 W.WASHINGTON 
WAUKEGAN 



II 





• PRODUCTION 
SUPERVISOR 

WE ARE a leadns manufac- 
turer of soft flood components 
In neod of on oxpd, hands-on 
Production Supervisor. To join 
our loam, you must have: 

• 2-4 yrs exp In a manulactur- 
Incj environment. .- . 

• 1 year exp. as a production 
supervisor 

• Ability lo lead and train 
employees 

■ Mechanical Aptitude 

• Knowledge for planning and 
directing a depL 

• Bilingual in Spanish a plus 

WE OFFER a competitive ben- 
efits pfcg & a salary commen- 
surate w/axp & education. 

IF VOL! meet these require- 
ments, send/lax (847-395- 
6662) resume w/salary history 
In confidence to: Human 
Resources Dept.. NUWAY 
SPEAKER PRODUCTS. INC.. 
905 Anita Avo., Anticcrt. 
I L 00002 






7] 



Full Time & Part Time 
Tremendous Growth ■ 40+ Positions fiddedUSt 



netDIRECT, Chlcagaland's premier Internet service 

provider Is experiencing tremendous growth In 

1999, located In Grayslake. 



y 



5 MIDWEST 7K/ 
ft KJEN WORTHJNC. ft 

ft MECHANICS ft 
Ft Immed Openlnss,' ^ 

HnAldwest Kenv«>rth. Y 
the area's largest truck' y 
dealership Is on the ' \J 
mm move In 1999. Come Ji 
V |oin our team of Service Y 
y Prosl We provide family V 
y* hlth/dent Insurance at V 
"minimal employee cost ki 
We also provide: Y 
•Profit share ck savings [Y 
plan 'Paid sick leave 
'flex work schedule 
•Up to 3wks 
paid vacation 
* 1 00% paid uniforms 
\) ' 10 paid holidays/year 
^ Training &. 

y advancement opptys. 
We are not hiring for 
'Exp'd Truck Techs 
•Exp*d Refrigeration 
Techs. Call between 
8a-5p. M-F. 
8 16-483-7035 

or toll free 
800-766-7035 



V 
V 

v 

V 
V 
V 
V 

V 



RED LOBSTER 

All Positions Available 

Servers earn up lo $500 weekly! 

(Tip out not required) 

Benefits from Day One include: 

• Medical/Dental/ 
Prescription Insurance . 

» 401k profit sharing 

• Eye care plan 

• 50% discount on meals . 
during shifts. 

• 25% discount on meals 
at any Red Lobster or 
Olive Garden for family 
and friends 

Other benefits include: 
15% discount on slock 
purchase. 
Paid vacations 

You must be 1 8 years or 



older, friendly, outgoing, 
and willing to work ; 

ends. Apply anytime 



between liam-7 pmat: 

^-Lobstet^ 

445 EaatTownllno Road 
Vernon Hills 



X 



M i 



- • 



February 12, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers'/ C1 7 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanled 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Experienced Insulation Installers 

We have immediate openings 

available for fully experienced 

Installers of fiberglass batt and 

blown-in Insulation. This Is a 

year-round position paid on a per 

square foot basis, that Includes 

medical benefits and other fringes, 

working for the largest professional 

building materials supplier in the 

nation. Please call (847) 223-3250 

and ask for Tom or John, 

or fax your resume to 

(847) 223-4188. 



JTCO NCR ETE 
CUTTERS 

Immed Openings 
S. Florida & Georgia 
opptys. ABC Cutting 

Contractors seeks 

exp'd Concrete 

Cutters & Core 

Drillers for our S. FL 

& Atlanta offices. 
Top pay & bnfts for 
top operators. EOE & 
drug free workplace. 

800-899-6222 x232 



P* 



^ 



Maintenance Technicians 

Nichols Aluminum Lincolnshire, an ISO 9002 

certified leader in the processing of cold rolled 

aluminum sheet, is seeking qualified maintenance 

technicians. 

The qualifications include knowledge and proficiency 

in welding/gas cutting, hydraulics, pipe fitting, pumps, 

power transmission, lubrication, rigging, shop 

machines - tools and equipment, baste electrical 

and pneumatic. 

Starting wage will, be $18.28 for individuals 

successfully passing the maintenance qualification test 

Additional wages include a production bonus shared 

by all shop employees, quarterly safety bonus, 

yearly attendance bonus and 3-2-2 premium. 

An excellent benefit package including: Group, Health, 

Dental and Life, a 401 -K plan which includes a 

6,5% contribution by the Company after one year 

and a stock purchase plan.. 

Please contact Stan or Julie at: 

Nichols Aluminum 

200 Schclter Road 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

800-442-0707 

\ • EOE/M/F/H/V ^_ 




How To 

Sxirvive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: PIcasescUleabeLAfriendrnenUanedlhaiifl sign on with 
a search firm that it prohibits me from being able to continue 
to work on my own as well. The Idea sou nds ridiculous. 
W.S.- Ubertyville. 

DetuCwi. 

It should sound ridiculous and It Is. Make sure that you are not 
signing anything to that fact Whether or not a service is 
Instrumental In making that happen or you do It on your own, 
the most important thing is to have wages coming In. Register, 
with one that you feel will benefit your type of employment 
needs. Be open about what your tikes and dislikes arc. Focus 
more on what you want to do and less on what you are just 
willing to settle for. Communicate honestly to your counselor, 
yet keep an open mind. Quite often people see themselves 
going In one direction only, while a professional licensed 
counselor often sees various roads and avenues of potential 
career changes or availabilities that otherwise may never had 
occurred to you. If for nothing else • finding out what may lie 
ahead Is probably intriguing enough to make an appointment 
Always read any materials that you arc asked to slgn„.any- 
where! Look for those employment services that do not charge 
applicants a fee. Measure the success of your search by the 
results that you are seeing. Has there been good activity and 
communication between you and your counselor? Have you 
been set up with desirable interviews. Basically.. .do you see it 
working for you? If the answer Is yes,. .great. ..If no.. .move on to 
another,..oll the while continuing to look on your own and net- 
working wherever possible. 

Q: A former co-worker recently was contacted by a search firm 
regarding a position with a competitor of ours. lie confided 
that he was going to Interview with this company which was to 
be moving here from out of state. He was offered the position 
starting at a substantially higher salary than ho currently had 
been making and so accepted their offer several weeks ago. We 
had. worked in the same capacity for 7 years and I can't help 
but feel I too woul d be great foraslmilarposltlon.l have called 
.the company, however, they say that they are not accepting 
applications or resumes at this time. Is there a different 
approach I should be taking? W.S. - Gunicc 

DearVV.S, 

Yes! I may suggest that you contact your friend and ask If he 
could recommend you to the person that helped him obtain 
his position at the search firm. Recruiters and search firms are 
in the business of scouting out specific talent for their clients. 
They look for people who may be outstanding In their field or 
Industry, When an Individual Is recommended tomc.they get 
my attention.' Perhaps there are no positions available at this 
time, however if you can get your name in with the recruiter, 
you may be suitable for nnother company out there searching 
for someone with your talent as well. 



Letters can be tent to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Ncwipa|teti ( . 
: P.O. fi ox 268, Gmyslake, I L 00030 



I 



PERMANENT FULL 
TIME POSITIONS 

FLOOR CREW 
MAINTENANCE 

10 PM to 7 AM 

WEEKENDS REQUIRED, 

MUST HAVE SOME 

EXPERIENCE GREAT 

BENEFITS LIKE 

PROFIT SHARING, 40 IK, 

ILLNESS PROTECTION 

PLAN AND MANY MORE 

PLEASE APPLY AT 

WAL-MART IN 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. 




m 



raphic 
fesigner 

"We're looking for a 

"graphic designer" io join our team. 

Do you have experience with 

computers and graphic design * 

programs? If you do, 

then we can leach you the 

rest in ihis entry level position. 

[Send your resume to NEAL TUCKER at J 

L "'""••••••••••••••••MttiMit ; 

Lakeland Newspapers 
. ' 30 S. Whitney St. 
t Grayslake, IL 60030 
a'orfaxto-223-8810 





& Sdlfficu. 



HrfM® fctfflffi 



Chicagoland's 
premier Internet 
service pre vidcr 
and web 
developer is in 
search of inside 
sales reps. 
Excellent 
commission 
structure. 

We offer flexible hours: 
8:30 am- 12:30 pm, 
T2:30pm^:30 pm or 
4:30 pm-8:30 pm. If you are. 
interested in creating a future in 
a rapidly growing organization, 
tax resume to SKVV 
(847)223-8810 or e-mail: 
skw@us-netdirect.com 



\ 




i 



NetDireet 

Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847)223-8199x174 J) 



RR^HGHTIR/PARAMEDIC 

The Grayslake Fire Protection District will begin 
accepting applications to establish an eligibility list 
for Firelighter/Paramedics. Interested parties must 
appear in person to obtain an application at the 
Grayslake Fire Station, 160 Hawley Street, 
Grayslake, Illinois, 60030 Monday thru Friday, 
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. beginning February 4, 1999. 
Persons completing the application must be certi- 
fied as a Firefighter II by the State of Illinois and a 
Certifier/ Emergency Medical Technician; 
Completed applications and all required docu- 
ments must be returned In person by 5:00 p.m., 
February 26, 1998. 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

to$21.60/HR 

Inc. Benefits, Game 

wardens, security, 

maintenance, park 

rangers. No exp heeded 

For app. and exam info 

call 1-B00-81 3-3585, 

ext 2407. 8am-9pm, 

7 days, fds Inc 






HAWTHORN LAKES 

RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 

Needs You... 

RECEPTIONIST 

F/T & P/T Reception ists for 430pm-l:0Qam and 

12&0am-9;00am shifts to answer phones, greet 

residents & visitors, etc. No exp. nee Must enjoy 

working with seniors, $8/hr + benefits & exc. work 

environment 

CQQK 

F/T & P/T Cooks. AM, PM Sc wknd shifts avail. 

$8/hr + benefits. 

DISHWASHER 

F/T & P/T Dishwashers; AM, PM & wknd shifts 

avail. $6/hr + benefits. 

SERVER 

P/T Server for AM shifts Mon-Fri. Up to $5.75/ht 

PUSSEK 

P/T Busser for AM shifts Mon-Fri. Up to $5.50/hr. 

BUTLDING MA INTENANCE 

F/T (Mon-Fri) Building Maintenance person. Rcsp 
inc bqt set ups, trash removal, carpet shampooing, 
inl/ext maint, light bldg repairs. 

Excellent pav & work environment " 
i Call RosaB47/367-2S16 or apply in person 
10 B. Hawthorn Pkwy, Vemon Hills, IL 60061 



911 COMMUNICATIONS OPERATOR 
VILLAGE OF GURNEE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Duties incl. operation of 911 emergency, 
computer aided dispatch, & emergency medical 
dispatch systems for police & fire depts.; 
providing administrative support to police 
personnel & general public. Qualifications: H.S. 
dipl./equiv.; min. 1 year in Public Safety 
Dispatch; ability to: accurately type; perform 
multiple tasks simultaneously, work under 
stressful conditions, perform work in a sitting 
position for an extended period of time, and .. 
employ selective attention in an environment 
w/a variety of distractions. Must be able to ' 
meet shifts reqs. & Village residency reqs. Ideal 
candidate will, have previous CAD & EMD 
experience. Starting salary $29,062 / DOQ + 
full benefits. Variable schedule. 

■ 

Appls. can be picked up at the Village Hall, 

; 325 N. O'Piaine Rd., Gurnee IL 60031. 

847-623-7650 

Deadline is 5:00 p.m., 

Friday, February 19, 1999. 

EOE 



[Distribution 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING 

FOR A PART-TIME 
WORK SCHEDULE... 
THEN KEEP READING!!! 
PICKERS & PACKERS 
Cole-Parmer Instrument Company is an 
international distributor and manufacturer of ■ 
scientific instrumentation products servicing 
educational/technical communities, industrial 
firms and governmental agencies. We currently 
■ have opportunities with great hours; 
$8.00 Per Hour!ll 
(Full Time) 
10:3OAM-7PM 
Part Time 
(Flexible) 
We are looking for bright, dependable, 
• . hard-working Individuals with good 
communication skills and a strong customer 
service orientation. We encourage, internal ■ 
advancement while offering an outstanding work 
environment. Please cajl or send/fax 
. resume or ietter of interest: 
Clare English r 
625 E. Bunker Court 
Vemon Hills, IL 60061 
PH: 847-549-7600, Ext. 5023 

Fax:847-549-1515 

e-mail: .HRecoleparmer.com 

Cole-Parmer 

Instrument Company 

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



Administrative Assistant 
COMMERCIAL 
REAL ESTATE 
Waultttjan * On Hwy 4 1 

Energetic, mativaled seff -starter needed 
to support VP to/tl phase of mklg & 
leasing: genera* prcposah/comsp; 
prepay rrJdg uvcys; & moot Rap 
I •! yrs AA ap, PC Ueucy k the 
desire to learn & go tht "extra mfe". 
Brigh! grads encouraged to apply, EOE. 
C*cat90^pokrtiaLAmhu|rtUi 
Bushes* PiCal 847-835-5271. 
rAXM7-*ttM086 



I 



HOUSEKEEPING 

Victory Ukc* b growing and now 

tut full mi pot lime pnMttn* 

ml UMe fat runlworldjig «*] 

drprndible people Io c om Hot 

keeping uur bouillul ticfl Mr dcwi 

. and »ife. Complete benefit* 

package mJUtiie. 

plcatc tpphf io penon. 

\ 7 , o»— ».C— 

I OSS tit Grind Avenue 

UndenhurM.il. 60046 

(between rmxri 83 >nJ 41 I"* 

eat ut Deep Like ad.) 

Or tar more Isifarnutkn nil 

»l7-3«-l»l 
equal opponunirf employer 



. ■ , 



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We have openings 

for outbound call 

custorner service 

reps. In UbertyviWe, 

Buffalo Grove and 

Nortnbrook. 

$8.OO-$10lOO an 

hour otependng 

on experience. 

Ca& Kate 
B4?-24>2200 



5g$ . , 




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GM dealers. 







DRIVERS 

Immed Openings. Wanted! 

Safe, accident-free Drivers. 

We offer 

•UptoJ3/mile 

•$200 sign -oo bonus - 

•Htlh insurance 

'A0 \ K retirement savings plan 

•Paid vacation 

•Assigned eqpml 

•9fl% no touch freight 

•Layover Pay 'Breakdown pay. 

We Reward Safe 

Dependable Drivers! 

Qrtrly safe driving 

bonus w/add'l bonuses for 

3 or more consecutive . 

safe driving qrtrs. 

Call 800-999-1980 

x244 Todayl 



f 



.\Udlilliu 

CNC MACHINE 
OPERATORS 

Pur to our roniinuetl powili and 
npjnsinn l Ills nublitheJ Norih 
StijburbaiinuiiuracturrTof 
iTudiinnl parts Is Sffklnj CNC 
Mjciiiiir Oprrircrs v^sli j mint- 
mum of i-$ years riperienrr. 
Mutt luve «!■£- jbiliry tu perform 
othta. nfonitor/ctunge loolinj; 
and rrad blurpflnf/mlrroiueten/ 
ratlpen, Ret|uirn good nuih 
ililit, 

Quilillrd randldairs Will tx 
offrtrd a cotii|wri{ive wage (bated 
on flpcrleticc) and benefits pack' 
Jgt Iiiclud lug 40 1 K and (Yofit . 
Sharing For (mmrdtaif comlder- 
iiion, call or forward miime to 
Human Resourtci an 

PTf**? Prffff iwi PYwprti 

601 N.SVoltieHwy. 

UkeBlurf,IL60O44 ' 

Phone: 84 14 7M 3 00 

FAX: B47-47J- »06 

EOEM/F/D/V 



•Pri- 



. I 




I 



1. 

C18 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 12, 1999 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



HAIR STYLIST 

Chair rental available, 
new upscale salon. 

Call Glnny 
(847) 838-2200 



: \ 



1 



..I MI I III I M I IHIM I 

EXPERIENCED ; 
PLUMBER 

Call Monday through 

Friday between 

8 am and 3 pm 

(847) ZbS-lbZb 

♦«I M » M » I I HMf t» » 






Drivers & Owner 
Operators 

Immed Openings. 

Hero's the Relief 

You've Been Waiting 

For... *Low deadhead 

• *Veiy little layover 

•Newpaypkg 
•Bnfts after 90 days 
*6mos exp welcome. 
Call Navajo Express 

800600-1440 



IkAAikAikikAAJkikA 



Security 



Full/Part-time 
positions available 

In Halnesvllle. 

$7.00/hr starting pay. 

All applicants must 

apply In person Mon 

thru Thursday 

10;00am-2:00pm. 

ASI Security Inc. 

> 1001 E. Chicago Ave. 

3 Napervllie, II 60540. 









Machinist ,1 

Full & Part Time 

General machine 

shop seeks exp. ' 

machinist to run 

engine lathes and 

mills. Please call, 

fax or stop in: 

Force Mfg. Co. 

461 Pork Ave. 

Suite 100 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 

847-265-2942 
Fax:847-265-2944 



SALES 

INSIDE SALES/DISPATCH 
Vulcan Materials Co., tr» 
nation's loading aggregate 
producer, seeks an Inside 
Sales/Dispatch pereon. Lata 
Co area. Duties include 
cfepatching trucks, rxtoo quotes, 
Wing, Mustbohignty 
moUvated, able to work 
independently. KnowVxJgoof 
construction Industry a plus. 

Fun time position has excellent 
bonefra & growth potential 

For consideration, send resume 
wtealary history. 
Vulcan Materials Co. 
747 E. 22nd #200 

Lombard, IL G014S 
Attn: Lake Co. Dispatch Oppty. 
(EOE) 



; 



PAINTER'S 



i 




needed. Must 
Be Clean Cut 
Have Good 
Transportation 
S^Valld Driver's 
License. 

E^Leave Message 
623-0723 




Insulation 

Installers 

Needed 

experience 

preferred, but will 

train if needed. 

Southern Wl & 

Northern IL area 

Builders 

Insulation 

815-675-0085 

iwnim nirmimnramiHMiiiwmmi 




Full Time Summer Position 

LIFEGUARD/WATERFRONT 

DIRECTOR 

Positi6n is for outdoor 

kids camp 10 weeks 

in summer. 

June, July, August 



Call (847) 573-0252 Ask for Roberta 



DENTAL OFFICE 
OUR LAKE FOREST DENTAL PRACTICE 

HAS IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR A 

HYGIENE COORDINATOR (F YOU ARE 

SEEKING ACHALLENCINC AND FUN 

EXPERIENCE AND YOU HAVE A GREAT 

PERSONALITY AND ATTITUDE, WE WOULD 

LIKE TO MEET YOU. 

PREVIOUS DENTAL ASSISTING EXPERIENCE 

WOULD BE HELPFUL, BUT NOT NECESSARY. 

VVEOFFERCOMPETrjrVESALARYANDBENEFITS. 

PLEASE CALL (847) 234-8608 



S 



TRUCK MECHANICS 



N 



Atdfidge Etcr trie, Inc., Fleet Services has immediate 
openings for (he following positions: 

MECHANIC with 2+ years' Ford F-series dicsel 
experience. CDL will be required. 

ENTRY LEVEL MECHANIC to work on Ford/ 
International Truck Fleet, light and heavy duly off-road 
equipment. 

We' offer a competitive salary and complete benefits , 
package. Please either complete application form at 
28572 N. Bradley Road, Libertyvifle, IL 60048, between 
the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. or phone 
(847) 247-5215 between the hours of 5:00 p.m. and 
10:00 p.m. and leave your name and phone number, 



220 



Help Wanled 
Full-Time 



Growing church In 

Lake Zurich Is looking 

for a full-time 

Administrative Assistant. 

We are looking (or 

someone with good 

office managerial skills 

and good computer 

knowledge. If you are a 

quick learner and would 

enjoy working in a 

church office, call 

Felix Mathew at 

847-540-8280 



'""' """ mmnmi)iniiHTiiiimimiHimSnTi 



SALES CONSULTANT 

Immediate opening 
for an outgoing and 

detail minded 

■ Individual for our 

lighting showroom. 

Apply In person at: 

I WARREN ELECTRIC, INC. 

33261 N. Hwy. 45 

Wildwood, IL 

or fax resumes to: 

(847) 223-8693 



ELECTRICIAN 

Immediate opening for 

Residential/Commercial 

with 4 years minimum 

experience 

Benefits Include: 

Vacation, Holiday, 

Health & Life Insurance. 

847-223-4682 
.Contractors 

Electric 
Services Inc. 



I 



INSURANCE 

ALL POSITIONS REQUIRE 
INSURANCE EXPEREINCE 

• C0MM1CSR .to»SK 

•GROUP ADMIN.- .toJSOK 

• PERSONAL UNESCSR toJ32K 

•COMM!TECHASST.....to$32K 

HALLMARK 

(847) 298-1900 
Fax (847) 298-1906 

email: hpl2200aol.com 



KJNDEflCAREO 
Learning Canter v 

in Mundelein Is 
an NAE.Y.C. 
accredited 
program seeking a (uli-timo 
SCHOOL AGE TEACHER 
Excellent benefits, competitive 
salary and a team work 
atmosphere. 

Can 

847-970-9554 

EJDJL 




FULLTIME 

RECEPTIONIST 

Work In a fast paced 
environment. 

Days, some early evenings, 
alternating Saturdays. 

Computer experience 
required. 

Apply in person or send 
resume to: 

Mundelein Animal Hospital 

1133 Yf. Maple Ave. 

Mundelein, IL 

No phone calls 
please. 




ACCOUNTANT 

Great Lakes Credit Union, located near 
Waukegah, IL, has an excellent career opportunity 
for an Accountant This person will remit funds for 
sold loans, balance loan sales G/L's, and assist with 
related department projects. Qualified individuals 

will have excellent excel experience, good 

communication skills and analytical skills. Degree 

not required but preferred. To apply fax resume to 

8-47-887-8798 or e-mail jenc@glcu.org. Call our 

JOB HOTLINE at 847-578-8909 to find out more! 

EOE 



RETAIL 
AAERCHANDISER 



I 



A National leader In rhe rait 
growing ratal) merchandising 
Industry nai ongoing port-tlmt 
and fuU-rimt opportunltlei for 
relet ipedoint In your orta 
Expertenct with rtstltlng KBC/ 

Grocery coJtgortoi twlprul but not I 
a mutt Paid training. Mileage 

Rvtmburwmtnt Reliable - . 
rrorupottaKorv abte to lift 25-30 I 
IbtamuttVforhwMhliArViK I 

Mu»i b* avail oble for 10 noun pet . 

day. Exctflenr health beneflfi, 401K I 

and opportunity for advancement | 
CoH'tmnwdkiltry, S0O-W2-M17 ■ 



220 



Help Wanted 
. Full-Time 



WMTSIAFF 

immediate Positions 

•Weekends* 

Call 

847-587-8088 

Jukebox Sports Bar 



$220 TO $650 WUKLY1II 

Assemble Products or Mailing 
Brochures From Home. Any 
i Hours! No Experience 

Necosaiyl FT/PT. 

QJI First American Publishing 

1.B00-818-9979 

Ext 37 24hrs 



Tired of Earning 

$2000 to $3000 a month when 
your lifestyle demand* more? 
I need 10 key people. High $$$ 
for (hose able to (rain and 
motivate others. 

CALL: 847/604-4971 



Cupid rf 

was 

here. 



Check out 

Cupid's Connections 

in this week's paperl 




H«ipWort*d 

Software Support 
Specialist. Full knowl- 
edge of Windows 95 
a must. Knowledge of 
NT helpful. Full bene- 
fits. Fast growing con- 
cern. Put your knowl- 
edge to work. 
Apply in person: 

Inacomp Computer Systems 
D20 Lakeside Drive, Suite 
Gumee, IL 60031 



WAUCONDA 

based business 

has a fulltime 

WAREHOUSE 

POSITION 

Must be able to 

lift heavy items. 

Salary plus 

benefits. 

Gall. ■:; 



^52^,1380 



r 



MMIfKHillrtllKlllll I 4MttMM> 

OfficE PosjtIon 

Arc you RiiUbli, 

(m nr,E,iit ai*(1 Iun id wonk ujili? 

If you Iwvf bulc cokipuitR skills, 

Midiwl on doiwl olfict txprnUsct 

A.S(J qO0d All CM I ON IO (It [Ail, OU« 

busy om! «jftf,fHv ollict my be 
ilrc pUu lost youl lhls feati ollict 

pCrtllloS RtOUlRll full-liMt llOUM 

(ho wf ikcnds) wul v*U*y Is h/wid 

UDON apiRllACt. 

all 
(847)625-?° 15 

IO lift J CHJI WORE* 

»l*miiJi!lfl*MelillM*ieil**eil*ll*e<*llir* 



r j c Penney 
Optical ,» 

has immediate opening. 

Some experience 

helpful but will train. 

30 to 40 hrs. 

available. 

Benefits, commission 

and associate discount. 

Hawthorn Center 

Vernon HIUs 

367-OW 

■uuiutwimuiuiituimiiiuiuMuuiutuiUiiiutii 
PERSONALITY PLUS? 

Customer Support - 

7 new positions now 

available $8- 10/nr 
plus incentives 

Superior Personnel 

244-0016 
Gurnee 

or 549-0016 
Vernon Hilts 



@ 



uptrior . '. 
IVnoDod 



■llUIUUUUIUUUIttl 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



$20,000 
IN FOUR MONTHS 

No selling. 

Will Train. 

800-995-0798 

oxt. 1255 

24hrs. 

CARDLINK INTERNA- 

TIONAL NO longer the best 
kept secret. Thousands ere 
making tens ol thousands. No 
selling, no recruiting. Call now 
and change your life. 1-888- 
489-9433, (SCA Network). 

FREE GRANT MONEYI To 
start or expand your business, 
purchase equipment, pay 
salaries, rent, overhead, medi- 
cal bids, tuition, debts. NEVER 
REPAY. Free Information 1- 
81 8-377-4074. (SCA Network). 

MOLLY MAID HOME sorv-' 
Ice Is big business. Join ex- 
panding leading residential 
cleaning franchise. Train- 
ing/technology. Minimum In-' 
vestment S12-S15K, financing 
available, protected territories. 
800-665-5962. www.molly- 
mald.com 

NEED EXTRA INCOME?? 

Start off the New Year. 

Become a Homemaker's Idea 

Company Consultant. 

•Unlimited Income* 

'Bonuses* 

•Flexible Hours* 

•Be Your Own Boss* 

Perfect for stay at home 

moms 

Call Todayll 

1-800-639-4516. 

REACH OVER 13 MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS IN 
THE U.S. AND CANADA. 
Place your ad In more than 
800 newspapers Just like this 
one around the U.S. and Cana- 
da by advertising In SCAN-the 
Suburban Classified Advertis- 
ing Network. Call 800-356- 
2061. (SCA Network). 

YOUH OWN TRAVEL 
AGENCY NEEDED LOCAL- 
LY. Investment $7,900, 
PT/FT. Fun, great $$$. Out- 
standing travel/tax benefits. 
Comprehensive training/ongo- 
ing support. FREE TAPE B00- 
299-9740 Ext. IL92. 



228 



Situations Wanted 



ELDERLY CARE.- 15 years 
experience. Excellent refer- 
ences. Some nurses training. 
Will do live in. Call (847} 
587 r 2263 or (847) 216-2141 
(beeper) anytime. 

HOUSE CLEANING. 18 
years experience. Bonded, in- 
sured, reference available. 
(B47) B38-4537. 

HOUSEKEEEPER HAS 

OPENING. Experienced. 
Call Wanda at (847) 566-9936 



250 


School/Instruction 



PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now lor students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 



250 



School/Instruction 



TUTORING-GURNEE 
Teacher with Master degree 

providing quality, private 

tutoring for K-8 students. 

Committed, respectful and 

motivating. 

Klmborly (847) 548-7057. 



301 


Antiques 


DISHES AND GLASS- 
WARE Depression; Variety of 
patterns. Call (4,14) 653-9722 
leave name and number. 


304 


Appliances 



STACKABLE WASH- 

ER/DRYER, ELECTRIC, 

2yrs. old, $599/best. (847) 
973-7353. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



BEANIE BABY AND 
SPORTSCARDS SALE 

Register to win Erin Beanie 
Buddy. Millenium, $40. Valeria- 
na, $40. Signature, $40. All 
three for $100 with this ad 
(while supplies last). Prime- 
time Sportscards, 3398 Sheri- 
dan Rd,, Zlon (next to Dunes 
Theater). Open 7/days a 
week. (847),746-2273. 

BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/TRADE 

Best Inn 

1809 N.Milwaukee 

Llbertyvilfe, 

Sunday 2/14, 

10am-3pm. 

Thursday 2/18. 

11am-7pm. 
Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

BUY/TRADE 

Best Inn 

1809 N.Milwaukee 

Ubertyville. 

Thursday 2/11, 

11am-7pm. 
Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 
BUY/TRADE 

Holiday Inn Gurnee, 

6161 Grand Ave. 

Friday, 10arn-10pm. 

Saturday, 1Qa'm-7pm, 

Sunday, 9am-7pm. 

Free Admission. 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

Buy/Trade 

Paradise Restaurant 

2964 Sheridan Rd., Zion. 

Wednesday 2/17/99, 

9am-5pm. 
. Free admission. 

BEANIE BABY SHOW 
Great Lakes Youth Center, 
Forrestal Village, 
Friday, February 12ih. . 

5:30pm-9:30pm. 
In Recroom next to gym. 



314 



Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40X60X14, 59,094. 50x75x14, 
$12,275. 50x100x16, 
$16,879. 60x100x16, $18,261. 
Mini-storage buildings. 
40x160, 32 units, $16,914. 
Free brochures, www.senllnel- 
bu1ldlngs.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, . 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. , 

STEEL ~~" I-BEAMS 
20F7.X18FT. Many to 
choose from. (B15) 344-1160. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



MS OFFICE '97 WORD, Ex- 
col, Power Pt., Access Out- 
look, sealed, $75. (800) 
801-5345. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



MOVING SALE FURNI- 
TURE, matching sleeper 
'sofa/lovoseat, recllner, kitch- 
en table with chairs, VCR's, 
TVs, computers, bikes, cloth- 
ing, knick-knacks, microwave, 
Karoo ko machine, office desk 
with swivel chair, like hew. 
Much miscellaneous. 137 
Cedar Ave., Lake Villa. Friday 
9am-5prn, ,Satufday, v inoon- 
6pm. ' ' ' 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
Is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run it 
under the 'FREE of Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847) 223-8161, ext. 140. 



334 



Good Things To Eat 



HOME GROWN BEEF. Cus- 
tom cut, freezer ready. (815) 
648-2316. 



338 



Horses & Tacks 



YEAR OLD TB mare,. 

dressage/hunt jump. 15H 
$1,800 -or best offer. (847) 
838-0721 after 5:30pm week- 
days. 

GOOD QUALITY SQUARE 
AND ROUND BALES OF 
HAY AND STRAW FOR 
SALE. Can deliver. (414). 
24S-1331. 

HAY FOR SALE. 'Horses 
love round bales loo. All stored 
inside, On the spot delivery;., 
Over 20,000 served. (815) 
568-7128. ■■ 

RELIABLE HORSESHOER 
(816)385-2847. 

ROPER SADDLE 16", 
SUEDE CENTER, NEW, $400,; 
(815)338-5774. 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



BATHROOM- VANITY- 
BASE 60in. with oak finish, 3-' 
door, 3 -drawer, white cultured 
marbte top,, single faucet, 
5200/best. 24IN. BATH- 
ROOM VANITY BASE with 
natural .oak finish, 1 -door, 2-. 
drawer, white cultured marble : 
lop, single faucet, $150/best: 
TOILET, 12ln. offset, com- 
plete with seat, $25/besl. 
(847) 395-8312 evenings 
after 5pm. 

BLUE BATHROOM FIX- 
TURES, toilet/toilet tank, ba- 
sin, medicine cabinet with* 
lights. 2-wlndow A/C's. (847) ' 
223-5511. •' 

STEEL FILE CABINET, 4 
drawers, letter size., lock, 
gray. $50.00, Gurnee. (847) 
263-1414 

TWO MAHOGANY CHIP- 
PENDALE UPHOLSTERED 
OVAL BACK SIDE CHAIRS, 
$100/ea. Mahggany marble 
top foyer tabled with matching 
mirror, $950. 2-colonial cherry 
stained pine currlos with 
poured, glass, ball feet, 
$950/ea. (815) 344-1675. 




FREE ROOM AND BOARD 
In exchange for live-In child 
care in my Undenhurst home, 
for 2-chlldren, ages 6 & 12yrs, 
Mom with 1-2 children, ages 5- 
12yrs. O.K. (847)356-2675. 

IN HOME DAY CARE IN IS- 
LAND LAKE has full and part- 
time openings, meals and 
snacks Included, lots of TLC 
and fun. (847) 516-9806. 



LICENSED DAY CARE IN 
MY HAINESVILLE HOME. 
Reasonable rales, lunches 
and snacks included. Imme- 
diate openings. Call for more 
Info. (847) 223-7254. 

LINDENHURST MOM 
NEEDS caring person to care 
for her children in our home, 
days. References required. 
(847) 265-6604. 

MOM WILL- BABYSIT IN 
MY ROUND LAKE HOME, 
6am-5:30pm, Meals and 
snacks provided. (847) 
740-0306. 



EXPERIENCED NANNY 

10YRS. American trained, 
seeks pan-time or full-time, 
live out position with apprecia- 
tive family. References avail' 
able. Respond: P.O. Box 445, 
405 Orchard, Antloch, III. 
60002. 

MOM WITH DAY CARE 
TEACHING EXPERIENCE 

has openings In her Wildwood 
home, Part/Full-time. Monday- 
Friday, 6am-6pm. Meals and' 
snacks Included. Lots of TLC 
and Fun. (847) 548-OB90. 

A LOVING MOTHER OF 2 
will care for your child In her 
Round Lake, home. Reason- 
able rates. Flexible hours. 
(847)546-3930.- 

CHILD CARE CERTIFIED, 

references, 1st and 2nd shift. 
Full or part-time, snacks pro- 
vided, 2019 45th St. (414) 
656-1486. 

CHILD CARE IN a loving 
and educational home day 
care, Call Rebecca (847) 
546-4330. 



MOTHER OF 1 looking to 
care for your children in my 
Round Lake Beach home, 
FT/PT. Call Trade (847) 
356-2322. 

MOTHER OF, 2 offering, b§- n 
by sitting at reasonable .rates.: 
In her Antloch home. (847) 
838-2978. 



NEED A SITTER? Mother of 
4 looking to babysit in my 
Round Lake home. (847) 
546-2884. 



NEED DAYCARE 
FOR A CHILD WITH 
SPECIAL NEEDS? 

Call Easter Seals at 
(847)949-0060 
for information. 



RESPONSIBLE, LOVING 
CHILD CARE PROVIDER 
NEEDED In Undenhurst 
home. Salary/hours negoti- 
able, References required, 
(847) 356-5160, (847) 265- 
9355. 



if-- 









February 12, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / CI 9 



340 



Household 
Goods/ Furniture 



BRASS BED QUEEN with 
new deluxe never used mat- 
tress set, $245, Black Iron ca- 
nopy bed queen, complete, 
$375. Delivery available. (847) 
236-0032. ' " 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

• Sofa/loves eat set, 

hunter green, $495, 

Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/Ioveseat, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Dlningroom sets, 10- piece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(647)329-4119. 

www.modelhomefurniture.com 

DININ GROOM' BUFFET, 
STONE contemporary style, 
eft.xISin., with ' pedestal, 
bought at Merchandise Mart, 
$500. (647) 635-2611. 

FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 8 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new, ask- 
ing $700. Excellent condition. 
Must see to appreciate. (847) 
973-0460. , 

FURNACE 60,000 BTU, 
- 5yrs. old, runs, great, 

$250/firm. (847) 244-2353. 

NICE, OLD ORIGINAL 
BUTCHER BLOCK, 22x22. 
Firm sell price $220, Call Barb 
(847)543-1965. 

SATELLITE SYSTEMS. 

18IN. DirecTV Dishes Basic 
Unit $99.00. Dual Box Systems 
Only -$199.00. $200 worth of 
free programming. Mention ad. 
receive free Install kit ($60.00 

value) 1-000-325-7836 

00111. (SCA Network). 



344 


Jewelry 



GIVE YOUR VALENTINE 

an Antique Diamond Emerald 
wedding ring In White Gold 
Bands. Appraised for $4,100, 
asking $3,100. Call Donise at 
(414)598-9107. ... 

WEDDING RING MENS 
size 10, 14 karat yellow gold 
wilh .white gold Inlay. New In 
box. Valued at $1,100, selling 
for $500. (414) 605-8824 
leave message, 



349 



FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL 
RACOON SHORT JACK- 
ET.- Excellent condition, 
$200/best. (847) 356-1148. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



358 



Musical Instruments 



ORGAN LAWREY 2 key- 
board electric organ, Different 
sounds by touch of buttons. 
$500/D08t. (414) 694-21.45. 

ROYCE GLOSSY BLACK 
COMPLETE DRUM SET, 
excellent condition, $800, 10 
piece oak dining set, oval 
table/or round with pedestal 
base, 8-chaIrs, excellent con- 
dition, $1,100. (847) 
382-7176. 



360 


Pets & Supplies 



1981 YAMAHA SS440 
parts, almost everything.' 1980 
Polaris Galaxy 440, $250. 
Class 2 full size GM trailer . 
hitch, $35. Refrigerator, $20. 
(847) 395-7994 home, pager 
(847) 802-9033. 

BALLY'S PREMIER PLUS. 
DISCOUNTED! $800/best. 
Moved must sell. (414) 

862-7327. 

FORTY GALLON HOTWA- 
TER PILOTLESS POWERV- 
ENT VANGUARD, paid over 
$400,' asking $275. Call for de- 
tails. (847) 587-4814. ' 

MICHAEL JORDAN 
"SPACE Jam" cookie jar, In 
box, mint, $125, will ship. 
(815) 886-7063. 

MIRRORS (3) 5'X6', 
$225/ea. or $600 for all three. 
(847) 223-1247. 

NEW PORTABLE WAXING 
TABLE, $300/best, (847) 
543-9300. ■ ' - 

ROCKWELL DELTA BAND 
SAW with' stand, $100.' Rock- 
well Delta drill press with 
stand, $100,, Powermatic belt 
sander, 6In. with 9in. disc, with 
extra belts, $125.. Sears Roe- 
buck Jigsaw, $10. 1986 Bulck 
Century Wagon, 2.8 V6, good 
work vehicle, dependable, 
asking $500/best, Small Cher- 
ry filing cabinet, fair condition 
$25,(847)546-0516,. . 

SLOT MACHINE .'CASINO 

style, 3-cbln, 5-line, excellent 
condition, $495. , (847) 
421-9521, pager (708)' 644- 
4845, 

WOLFF TANNING "BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME; Buy DIRECT 
and SAV6I Commercial/home 
unlls from $199, Low monthly, 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log, Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



368 




CHIPPER OLATHE 986 hy- 
draulic disc, Ford powered, 
self-feeder, chips 121 n. limbs, 
good condition, $3,500/best. 
(847) 546-9510, pager (847) 
551-7459. 

TOOLS: 1/2HP12IN. wood 
lathe with attachments, 1- 
1/2 hp table, extension and 
router bils. (847) 526-7429. 

TWO 3 INCH trash pumps; 1 
Homelite - $550.00, 1 Teel • 
$350.00. One 2 inch trash 
pump,' Teel - $260.00, Hoses 
also available • suction and 
discharge. (847)546-3153 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



I Homes For Sale. 



AKC COCKER SPANIELS, 
black and chocolate, wormed 
and ready for your home. * 
Dave/Kelly (414) 889-4423. 

CHINESE SHAR PEI 
8/woek old mate, red fawn, all 
Shots, S250-S550. (615) 
597-2055. 

DOBERMAN PUPPIES 

BEAUTIFUL, good tempera- 
ment, AKC registered, black, 
ready, to go 2-13-99, $400. 
(815) 385-5060, 

DOQ SITTING 

IN MY HOME. • 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 966-6319. 

EXTRA LARGE DOG 

Igloo/house, Paid $150 asking 
$75, Call (414) 862-2909 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPIES AKC, champion 
bloodline, ' guaranteed hdallh, 
hips, temperament, $600. 
(414)657-2163. 

GOLDEN . RETRIEVER 

AKC PUPS, shots, wormed,' 
males $200, females, $450. ■ 
(920) 825-7487. 

GREAT VALENTINE'S 
GIFT American Cocker Span- 
iels, 2-male, 5-females, AKC 
registered, parents on premis- 
es, $250 & up, Ready 2/14. 
(414) 763-7918. _^ 

PEMBROOKE CORGI 

PUPPIES, 4-niales, S350/oa, 
Michele (847) 587-7110. 

ROTTWEILER/LAB PUPS, 

$20/ea.(647) 546-0951. 

SHIHTZU PUPPIES AKC. 
PLEASE . BE .-MY VALEN- 
TINEI Females and males, 
(414) 633-1569. 

THE SCOOP 

COMPANY 

Pet Clean-Up Service 

Affordable Rates. 

Weekly service. 

(847) 548-4633. 

VALENTINE SURPRISE 
ROTTWEILER puppies, 4- 
males, - talis, dewclaws, 
wormed, ready 2/7, $300. 
(847)740-0650. 

VALENTINES DAY BOXER. 
PUPPIES Fawn, females, 
$500-$600. AKC, large par- 
ents, (414) 654-6766 after 
4 pm or leave message. 



ANTIOCH GREAT LOCA- 
TION near town. Beautiful 
view, 2- large bedrooms/possi- 
ble 3rd In full finished base- 
.merit, 2-car garage, A/C. Ask- 
ing $126,900. (847) 
395-7238, 

BRISTOL .SPECTACULAR 
VIEWS, 3yrs. old, 2 miles 
from 1-94, 1-1/2 story with 
wrap around porch on 1 acre, 
3-bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, loft, 
open staircase, fleldstone fire- 
place, vaulted ceilings, artisan 
well, attached 2-1/2 car, ga- 
rage. Much more. $189,900. 
For appointment call (414) 
857-3013. - 

BY OWNER 3-BEDROOM, 
1-1/2 bath ranch, basement, 2- 
car garage, view of Camp 
Lake, 1-acro, $143,000. (414)- 
689-4643 leave message. 

CHAIN O'LAKES RIGHTS 
and views, 4-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, 3-car garage, triple 
wooded lot, lower than mar- 
ket, financing available. 28584 
Valley, Ingleslde, III. $152,000 
Reduced, (847) 587-4814. 

DEER PARK OWNER moti- 
vated. New, reduced $635K, 
4/5 bedrooms, 2-flreplaces, 3- 
car garage, finished walk-out, 
1st floor 'master suite, gour- 
met kitchen, 1 acre, 4-1/2 
baths, security system, (630)- 

773-4089. 

GRAYSLAKE IMMACU- 
LATE CONDITION, 3-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, cathedral 
ceilings, fireplace, deck, many 
upgrades, cul-de-sac location, 
walk to school, $184,900. 
(847) 54B-1668. 

IMMACULATE GRAYS- 

LAKE HOME with 2-stoiy en- 
try, 4-bedroms,. 2.5 baths, 
huge kitchen,' with island, mas- 
ter suite, first floor laundry, 
look-out basement, large land- 
scaped yard, 2.5 car garage, 
security system, 2-level deck 
with Jacuzzi, $249,900. (847) 
548-8633. 

LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
NEW CONSTRUCTION, 4- 
bedrooms, cathedral, ceilings 
with 4-skyllghts throughout 
2nd floor. 3-car garage. (847) 
587-6703, 

WINTER" -SPECIAL" 

$119,900 New Sutton on the 
Lake Subdivision, off Mona- 
vllle Rd. 3-bedrooms. 1-1/2 
baths, 2-car attached garage, 
basement, C/A. Selling for less 
than purchase price, If bought 
In February. (847)265-1419. 



LOOKING TO BUY 2 graves 
In Anlloch Hillside Cemetery. 
section 7. (847)546-0161. 

BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE BABIES, Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or all day 
weekends • 1 -886-291 -4932, , 
pin *6104, Ubertyvlile area. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- .-, or 
Parti. Alio JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASH I ;. Call' 
(630)985-2742. . 

WANTED ANTIQUES, 

DESPERATELY needed. 
Old furniture, marble top ta- 
bles, dressers, . dlningroom 
and livingroom sets, sofas, 
stain glass lamps, rugs, oil ' 
paintings, clocks and anything 
Interesting. Please call (647)' 
587-5848, 



OWNER FINANCING AN- 
TIOCH 4-bedrbom home, 3- 
•1/2 baths, dock off master, 
bedroom, inground swimming 
pool, hot tub, fireplace, 2-1/2 
car attached garage on 1 aero 
and lot on a dead-end street, 
$224,900 with reasonable 
downpayment. (847) 

838-0647. : 

ROUND LAKE BEACH S 
bedroom 1 1/2 bath ranch with 
screened In porch, gym set, 
satellite dish, targe shed, 1/2 
block to beach. Quiet neigh- 
borhood $110,000. (847) 
740-9985 

SALEM 31323 7 1ST. ST. 

2+bedrooms, new furnace, 
1/3 acre, 2-1/2 car garage, 
needs little TLC, -$71,900. 
Kevin (414) 697-9697 after 
2pm. 

MUNDELE1N A MUST SEE 
1 -bedroom, famllyroom or, 
second bedroom, everything 
new In the last eight years; 
windows, roof, etc. 2-1/2 car 
' Insulated garage, fenced 
• yard, excellent condition. Per- 
fect for single or busy couple. 
REDUCED $115,900, (847) 
566-7690. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Saturday 1/30 & 2/6, 

Sunday 1/31 & 2/7, 

, I2pm-2pm, 

81 16 203rd. Ave., 

Bristol, Wise, 

Pristine 3-bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath, family room, 

brick fireplace, 1/2 acre tot, 

Z-blocks from Bristol Grade 

School. Well maintained, 

$155,000. 

(414)857-6652. 

SCHOOL HOUSE 120YR. 
old brick uniquely remodeled 
duplex, 1.8 acre mini farm. 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths UP- 
PER, fireplaces, spiral stair- 
case, attached deck wilh out- 
side hot tub. 2,016sq.ft., 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath LOWER, fire- 
place, 1,240sq.ft.,1 -car brick 
garage, 30x30 2-stalt horse 
bam. In North Cape. By owner. 
S235.O00. (414)835-2349. 

' THREE ■ .. BEDROOM 

, RANCH, hardwood floor In liv- 
ingroom and bedroom, 
fenced-in, yard, on a quiet 
street In Round Lake' Park, 
$85,900.' (647) 497-3559' 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN Cute 2-bedroom, 1-bath 
home, I200sq.fi., basement, 
garage, C/A, 75x200 lot, com- 
pletely fenced, $79,900. Extra 
lot 50x200, S1 6,000. Broker 
owned. (414) 279-9888. 





Etch {JtkB kxkpcndentty 
owned tad operated 



FOX LAKE 

Gorgeous contempo- 
rary on beautiful 
wooded 1/2 acre lot 
Open design In this 
3 bedroom, 2. 1 bath 
home featuring vault- 
ed ceilings, gourmet 
kitchen, finished walkout L/L, marble 
F/P. Walk to schools. $189,900. 
, Formoreinfomiation 
Contact Tlieresa Meade ERA Statcline 

Realty. (847) 395-091 1 Ext. 35 
ore-mail: tmeadetPerastatelinc.com 



STATE OF ILLINOIS ) SS • No. 97 CH 5S4 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
JOHN CHARLES 8EES0N and MARY E. HARM AN, as Successor 
Tiusiccs under the CHARLES E. BEESON Trust dated September ' 
24, 1992 at Assignee of CHARLES BEESON and MAY BEESON, 
Plaintiff, ' „ 
vs. 

THOMAS E. BEESON, DONNA L BEESON; HARRIS BANK PALA- 
TINE, TMK DEVELOPMENT, LTD., MIDWEST TRADING HORTICUL- 
TURAL SUPPLIES, INC., WITTEMAN t. CO. B.V., OXFORD CAPITAL 
FUND, LTD., OUNLAP ENTERPRISES.LTD., UNKNOWN OWNERS 
and NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. 
THOMAS E. BEESON , Counter-PlalnllrT, 
vs. 

JOHN CHARLES BEESON and MARY E. HARMAN, aa Successor 
Trustees under the CHARLES E. BEESON Trust dated September 
24,'l992, JOHN CHARLES BEESON, MARY E HARMAN, Individual- 
ly, and the CHARLES E. BEESON, Trust, Counter-Defendants. 
wnnrF of sheriffs SALE OF REAL ESTATE 
MORTOAGE FORECLOSURE ; 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai pursuant lo a Judgment heretofore 
entered by the said Court in the above-entitled cause on December 1, 
1998. Sheriff ol Lake Courtly. Illinois, will on Monday, March 15. 1999 ol 
the hburot 9:00 AM at Ihe Robert H. Babcox Justice Center, 25 S. Uiica 
Street. Conference Room, Firal Floor, Waukeflan, Illinois 60085, sell ol 
public auction lo Iho highest bidder and best bidder lor cash, all and sin- 
gular, ihe (ol! owing described premises and real estate In the said 
Judgment mentioned, situation In the County ol Lake, State ol Illinois, or' 
so much (hereto as shall be sufficient lo satisfy said Judgment. 

Said property is commonly known as 11760 W. Route 22. Deerfield, 
Illinois 60015, 

P.I.N. 16-17-300-032-011 and 16-17-300-032-0010 

The person to contact for information regarding this property is: 

Mark T.' Hamilton at Churchill. Baumgartnar 4 Oulnn, 2 S. Whitney 
Sirael, Qmyslake, IL 60030. (847) 223-1500. 

The terms ol sale are; 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, by certified funds. No' refunds.' 

The property Is approximately a five acre parcel ol land Improved by o 
concrete block building, a one story concrete block garden store, and a 
glass greenhouse and frame building with a house a it ached. Including a 
three car garage, three lo lour bedrooms and one and one hall baihs. 

The Judgment amount was S1.B95.1 64.93. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

Together with ell buildings and Improvements thereon, and ihe leno- 
ments. hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



VA/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly, 
Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 
"Your Repo Specialists." 

(B47) 526-0300. 

WATERFRONT 100X325 
NEWER raised ranch, 2-bed- 
r oom3, 1-3/4 baths, 2-story 
workshop garage, wrap ar- 
ound deck, finished walk-out 
basement, sea wall, dock, low 
taxes, $169,000. (847) 
587-8353. 

WATERFRONT BUILT 
1996 GORGEOUS CAPE 
COD Covered front porch, 
12x24 deck, overlooking a bird 
sanctuary Island, 1/2 acre lot, 
2105sq.ft. up, 1365sq.ft„ walk- 
out basement, wjih wine cellar. 
3-bedrooms, 2.5 baths, mas- 
ter bedroom full bath, celling 
fans, first floor laundry, 2.5 car 
garage, $239,900. (847) 
587-1097. 

WAUKEGAN BRICK 2 unit. 
2-bedroorrv up & 3-bedroom 
down, 5119,500, (847) 361- 
8165,(847)623-3826. 

WAUKEGAN BRICK 2 unit, 
2-bodroom, up & 3-bedroom 
down, $119,500. (847) 361- 
6165,(647)623-3828. 

WAUKEGAN NORTH SIDE 
2-bedroom, 1-1/2 car garage, 
good neighborhood, $88,000. 
(847)662-2949. 

WHITE BRICK RANCH, 4- 
bod rooms, 2-1/2 baths,, 2 
blocks from Grade, Junior 
High and High Schools. Locat- 
ed In cul-de-sac, very, private. 
On 4lh fairway. McHenry 
Country Club, No agents or 
brokers. (815) 385-8162. 

WINTHROP' HARBOR 2- 
BEDROOM home, newly 
fonced big yard, garage, new 
shed, many updates, $88,000. 
847) 872-9388 J1 „ 



All-Sobs 

REPO'S 

Low down! 

••CALL- 



A company you can trust 

•MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

Liberty Re, Inc. 

630-539-6200 



Gov't Foreclosures 

BeadiferUBR $107,587 

2ofl3BR $72,000 

Mundefcin 1 BR $131,750 

Round Lake 3 BR $78,100 

IVaubgatUBR ....,-... $72,150 

LOW DOWN/MAKE OFFER! 

WESTERN REALTY 

630-495-6100 



504 



Homes For Rent 



504 



Homes For Rent 



VERNON HILLS DEER- 
PATH, 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
bathe, flreptaco, CAC, 2-car ' 
garage, now carpet- 
Ing/palnt/llle, close ' lo 
school/park/pool. Available Fe- 
bruary. (847) 367-8109. 

VERY NICE 2-8TORY 

home In Old Mill Creek, 4-bQd- 
rooms, 2,5 baths, 

S1,300/month plus deposit. 
Call Cathy, Monday-Friday, 
Bam-5pm, (847) 244-5330, 

WATERFRONT 2-3 BED- 
ROOM, 2-balh, newly remo- 
deled home on Center Lake, 
Salem, Wisconsin, .10 minutes 
North of Antloch, 111. Fur- 
nishod/unlurnlshed. alumi- 
num rowboat Included. No 
pats. Prefer non-smoking. 
$875/month plus utilities and 
security deposit. (847) 
438-3653 evenings. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 
OVER 55 COMMUNITY 
1 -bedroom, 1-bath, 
shed and carport, 
Includes cable TV, 
$610/month plus security. 
No pets. 
Available March 1st. 
(847) 526-5000 
leave message. 



BURLINGTON, WISCON- 
SIN LAKEFRONT house, 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
$950/month, 1st & last plus 
security deposit. Available 
March 1st. (414) 537-2361. 

GURNEE 3-BEDROOM, 1- 
BATH, washer/dryer, base- 
ment, C/A remodeled, lawn 
service Included, 

$l,l00/month plus security 
and utilities. Available 4/1. 
(847) 336-8730. 

LAKE VILLA NEWER du- 
plex, 3 large bedrooms, 1- 
bath, greatroom, fireplace, 
dishwasher, laundry room, 
plush carpeting, deck, 2-car 
garage, large lot, private lake 
rights, all good schools. 
$1,07 5/ month plus low gas 
and electric. No pets or smok- 
ing. Security deposit negoli- 
able. (847) 263-0215. 

THREE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, laundry facilities, large 
famllyroom, In downtown Mu- 
ndeleln above store. 
SBSO/monlh. (847) 566-4021. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH UP- 
DATE 3-bedroom 1 bath 
ranch on double lot, Eat-In 
kitchen. New appliances and 
carpeting. Freshly painted. 
Full- basement. Available Fe- 
bruary I5lii. $995/monlh.' 
(847) 945-5217. 

TWO BEDROOM, 2-BATH 
home, on Pistakee Lake, in 
Johnsburg. No pets. Security 
deposit and references re- 
quired." (847) 234-8900. 

WINTHROP HARBOR DU- 
PLEX quiet neighborhood, 2- 
bedroom, basement, garage, 
no pets. $690/month plus utili- 
ties and security, deposit, 
(847) 223-8269. 




iWalkto the train!;: 

IBR Duplex- 2nd 

Floor. 

No garage. 

•Long Terra Lease. < 

~'mo + 







es"&.sec.dep>' : 
•Land Managements 

- : ..-:■•:;.■ -i ■:•:■■ .■: --',■ 



508 



Homes Wanted 



WANTED 3-4 BEDROOM 
house, with 2-1/2 baths, fire- 
place, basement. In Grays- 
take/Gumee area. on a 3-5yr. 
contract for deed basis. Call 
Cindy (847)543-1741. 



514 



■ 
Condo/Town Homes 



GRAYSLAKE TOWN- 

HOME' 2-BEDROOMS, plus 
loft, plus office/den, 1.5 baths, 
livingroom, . dlningroom, A/C, 
washer/dryer, cathedral ceil- 
ings, skylights, large balcony, 
eat-In kitchen, all appliances, 
gas. 2-car garage, 
51,100/monlh plus deposit. 
Available 3/1. Month-to-month 
lease. (B47) 546-7973. 

VERNON HILLS MOTI- 
VATED. Georgetown Square. 
New 2-bedroom, 2-balh ranch 
townhouse. Many upgrades. 2- 
car garage, 5197,900. (847) 
478-9738. 

WATERFRONT CONDO, 
IN Fox Lake, 2-bedrooms, 
fireplace.balcony, garage, 
and deeded boat slip. Only 
$98,500. (815) 363-9242. 




518 



Mobile Homes 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 

Now 1997 

Manufactured home 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

with garage and recroom, 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

• stove/refrigerator, 
off street parking. 

$54,900, 
1988 2-bedroom, 2-balh, 
carport, shed and deck, 

$39,900, 
1 995 2-bedroom , 2-bath, . 
with garage and carport, 

$64,500. 
Available. Immediately. 
(847)526-5000 . 

• leave message. 

MODULARS • DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEW1DES 
• ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS. BASE- 

MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU! FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
788-1541. L- 



16X80 1993. MARSH- 
FIELD MOBILE HOME, newly 
carpeted, pets,- 3-bedroom, 
C/A, 35x100 back yard area, 
2-car driveway, deck, like 
brand new, . price negotiable. 
(414)694-3714. 

1993 MANUFACTURED 
HOME, Carefree Estates, 
Trevor, 1,680sq,ft„ 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, family- 
room with fireplace, living- 
room,' dlningroom,- C/A, In- 
cludes kitchen appliances, 
washer/dryer and lots of ex- 
tras. (414) 662-9729. 

1996 28X60 SCHULT MO- 
BILE HOME In Timber Ridge 
Park (Pleasant Prairie, Wise). 
3-bedrooms, 2-baths, formal 
dlningroom, sunroom, 

1650sq.fl, 10x24 deck, 12x16 
bam style shed. Excellent con- 
dition. Ait appliances except 
washer/dryer Included. 

$67,500/best.' (414) 

697-0286. 



MOBILE HOME, NICE 

comer lot, Rainbow Park, Bris- 
tol, 1973 Dlckman, 2 bed- 
room, 1 bath, large kitchen 
and living room, new carpet In 
kitchen, living and hall. Cen- 
tral air. New furnace 5 years 
ago.. New siding and awnings, 
1 year ago. Washer, dryer, 
stove and refrigerator stay. 
Asking $38,800. Very good 
condition. Call Pattl to see. 
(847)395-1143 




ANTIOCH LAKEFRONT 

PROPERTY. Newly remo- 
deled 1 -bedroom, 
$600/month utilities Included. 
No pets. (847) 528-0598. 

FOX LAKE 3-BEDROOM 

apartment on the lake, 
$650/monlh. Call Manager 
(847) 973-9139 or (847) 
526-3341.- 

GRAYSLAKE 2-BED- 

ROOM, ALL new, off Street 
parking, laundry, $700/month 
plus Utilities. (847) 223-8633. 

GURNEEAVAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

LAKEVtEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA. Large .1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$610-$745/monlh. Heat, wa- 
' ter, air. included. (847) 
356-5474. __ 

LARGE STUDIO APART- 
MENT in beautiful Vacation 
Village, 24hr. security, 
$425/monlh plus 1-1/2 
months security deposit. (847) 
587-5675. 

SPACIOUS NEWLY RE- 
MODELED 2-bedroom, dish- 
washer, heat Included, quiet 
building, $565/mohth. (847) 
336-2917. • 

WAUCONDA 2-BED- 

ROOM, CONVENIENT to 
stores, 2nd floor, stove/refrig- 
erator $550/month. Available 
Immediately. (847) 381-3846. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN' 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Large new 2-bedroom, 

2-bath, 1 -car heated garage, 

$895/month plus security. 

Available March 1st " 

No pets. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING, 

Over 55 community. 

Dream studio apartment, 

with heated garage stall, 

Includes all utilities. 

Call for availability. 

$825/month plus security. - 

No pets. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. • 

. WAUKEGAN NORTH 1- 
BEDROOM, heat Included. ■ 
$480/month plus security. 
Quiet, small, secure building. 
No pets. (847) 336-2400. 

Z10N LARGE 1 bedroom, 
« 2nd floor. Furnishing and 
• laundry facilities available. 

2412 Elm $525 /month. (847) 

872-2936 




Check out 

Cupid's 

Connections 

in this week's 
paperl 



: 






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. I ' f I I i t i ' ' .1 I 
I i I i i 






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1;{ ( 



C20 I Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 12, 1999 



520 



ApurtmeniFor 

Kent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

$495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847) 746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hnve placed classified 
(Hlverllslng Willi the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive n misleading atatcmenl 
from anollicr rinn request- 
ing payment Tor this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it lo your account, nil pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made m invoiced 
and directed lo: 

Lakelwd Newspapers 

PO Box 368 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Orayiltkc, JL 60030-0208 




UkEivood VilUqE Apartments 

In IslANd UkE ancI GRAysUke 

OfiERINq AffotKkbU llOUSiNq foR OUAliflEfJ AppliCANIS. 
NOW ACCEpliNC, AppilCAliONS foR OUR: 

• 1,2 ancJ J bsdROOM apartments 

Pl&WE CAll foR MORE iNfORMAliON OR ApDOiNTMEM AT: 

(847)225-6644 TDD# (800)526-0844 

LftkEWOod VilUqE ApARIMENI IS pitofESMONAlty |H^ 

MANAqEtl by MinidiAN Grtoup, Inc. == 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
AjPAjRTM ENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing far 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
fs?Y 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

pTSi Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. . , 



t'-*V':;?2: 



TfS 




The Search Is Over... 



Two of the finest apartment 

communities in the area are sure to 

have what you're loohing for. 



All of our apartments have: 

• 1 &. 2 bdrm spacious floor plans 

• On-site 24-hour emergency maint. 

• Laundry facilities 

• Convenient to Metra 

• Beautifully manicured grounds 

• Flexibly leasing 



ANTIOCH 

|manok1 

ArAKTMIHT* 

445 Donin Dr. 

Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-0949 




Deep Lake 1 lenniiage 

149 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847)356-2002 



A Place To Call Home 



G.P. Management, Inc 



tu 



528 



Apl/I lomcs 
To Share 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Non-smoking female to share 
brand new 2-bedroom, 2-balh 
towsnhouse In Llndenhurst, 
$525/monlh plus 1/2 utilities. 
Pool, exercise room, and ten- 
nis courts on site. Call Chris- 
llne (647) 356-5765. 

ROOMMATE WANTED to 
share 4-bedroom house, Fox 
Lake Hills area, must like 
dogs, $300/month. (847} 
587-7527. 




534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



DELI FOR RENT Benson 
Corners, in Bristol, Wisconsin 
(Shell). Gary (4 1 4) 857-9 1 23. 

ESQ SHARED FULL or part- 
time olfico space. Idoal for 
home basod business. (847) 

B5 5-4500. 

HAINESVILLE OFFICE 
SPACE 600sq.fl., excellent 
condition, great signage on Rt. 
120. $700/month. Trl-Counly 
R.E. (847) 815-1200. 



MUNDELEIN OFFICE 500 
N. Lake St,, 375sq.lt., carpet- 
ed, heated, plonty of parking, 
minimum 1yr. lease, 1 /month 
security deposit, $285/monlh. 
Available 1/1/99. Call Nick 
(847) 698-6280. 

SMALL MODERN OFFIC- 
ES FOR RENT IN BUR- 
LINGTON, 258 S. Pine, 
450eq.ft. Excellent location 
on main thoroughfare. All utili- 
ties and snow removal Includ- 
ed. Immediate occupancy. 
Call Rick at (414) 763-7686 
days, (414) 534-5258 even- 
ings. 



SPRUCE PARK OFFICE 

CAMPUS, In the heart of Gur- 
noe, buy or lease. (647) 
855-4567. __ 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

700/aoosq.ft. industrial space 
with regular overhead door, 
pay own utilities, $395/month 
each, plus security. (847) 
526-5000 leave message-. 

WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

1,080sq.ft. unit, $695 plus se- 
curity. Available Immediately. 
2400sq.ft. POLE BARN 
with concrete floor. Heat, elec- 
tric, outside storage can be 
added. Office trailer available. 
$495 as Is. Available Imme- 
diately. ISLAND LAKE IN- 
DUSTRIAL 3,000sq.ft. Shop, 
with loading dock and office, 
(1) 10f|.x10ft., (1) 101t.x11ft. 
overhead door. Available April 
1st. $1,180/monlh plus securi- 
ty. (847) 526-5000, leave 
mossaoe. 




RICHMOND 

Fountain Head 

Corporate Center, 

Rt. 12. 

New Superior; 
2500 to 7630 s.f. 
units, for Industry 

or Business, a/c 
ofc, Common or 

Private Dock. 
$4.95/s.f. 

Land Mgmt 
815/678-4771 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



SMALL FULL-TIME NAIL 
BUSINESS. Take over very 
well established clientele. Seri- 
ous buyers only. (847) 356- 
9025 leave message. 



Call Ross or Paula to 

place your ad. 

Call 847.223.8161 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



FLORIDA (Central) 

Auto Salvage Yard 

For Sale by Owner. 

Est'd 30yrs, 3 acs. 

Owner finc'g, 

turnkey. Fastest 

growing county 

inlIS.$375K. 

517-435-7499 




BUILDING(S) FOR SALE OR LEASE 

Grayslake 

1750, 3500, 5250 SQ. FT. 



UNIT SIZE 
1750 Sq. Ft. 
1750Sq. Ft.' 
1750 Sq. Ft. 



OFFICE 
275 Sq. Ft. 
500 Sq. Ft. 
275 Sq. R. 



LEASE PRICE 

S1200/per mo. 
$12007perma 

$1250/per mo. 



SALE PRICE 
5129,000 
$129,000 
5136,000 



Air conditioned offices and warehouses 
Please call Livorsi Marine - 847-548-5900 



544 



Mortgage Services 



NO DOWN PAYMENT? 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 
the home you need now, with- 
out a big downpayment. Com- 
plete financing If qualified. De- 
George Homo Alliance 1-800- 
343-2884. 



568 



OulOfArcaPropert) 



LAKEFRONT PROPERTY 
1-ACRE, pare tested, sand 
beach, large oak trees, Lily 
Lake, Wisconsin, $85,000. 
(414)857-6652, 



ALASKA 
(Kenai Peninsula) 

For Sale by Owner. 

Alaska, pvt home, 

on 20ac land, 

S. exposure 

overlooks lake, 

10 min to best 

fishing: halibut, 

salmon & trout. 

S250K obo. 

907-235-8258; 

Fax 907-235-2815 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles. 



1997 SPORTSMAN 27FT. 
TRAVEL TRAILER, fiberglass 
body, fully equipped, fully 
screened-ln porch, A/C, 
S13.000/besi. (815) 385-4670 

QEORGIE BOY 1985 MO- 
TORHOME 24ft., $9,900. 
(815)648-2316. 

STARCRAFT TRUCK 

CAMPER 1987, 9.5', excel- 
lent condition. Refrigerator, 
water heater, bathroom, air,. 

$4.000.(414)878-9747. 



708 



SnQwmablles/ATYs 



1990 WELLS CARGO en- 
closed, drive on/off, 12ft. , 2-3 
place, electric brakes, excel- 
lent condition, $2,000/ best. 
(815)356-1794. 

1993 YAMAHA EXCITER 
ll, LE model, electric start, 
$3000 or best.. (847) 
244-0403 after 5PM. 

1995/ POLARIS TRAIL 
INDY, 2800 miles, excellent 
condition, with cover, $2,400. 
(847) 949-7854. 

SKI-DOO BLIZZARD 

7500, 1979, RV chassis, very 
good condition, 5575/besl. 
(414) 877-2940 after Bpm. 

YAMAHA & IE LAND 1992 
Exciter, 2,300 miles, picked 
clutch kit, pipe, looks and runs 
great, 2 -place steel trailer, 
$2,400 for everything. (847) 
872-6779. 



710 



Boai/Molors/Etc. 



14FT STARCRAFT, WITH 

iBhp Evinrude and trailer, 
$900. (847) 838-2690. 

BOAT FOR SALE 1989 21ft 
Sea Sprite, Big V8, open bow, 
sun deck, great condition, 
seats 9, 1 -owner, white & blue. 
Price with trailer $10,000. Ask 
for Jerry (847) 587-9378. 



720 



Sports Equipment 



804 


Cars for Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



1997 KS KAWASAKI PRO 
CIRCUIT 125, $3.800/best. 
(847) 356-5949. . 

NORDIC TRAK ELITE. Ex- 
cellent condition. Top of the 
line. Paid $1,500.00 asking 
$750.00. (414)862-2909 

- SCHWIN MOUNTAIN 
BIKE, won It at draw box, 
been sitting in garage since 
1995, first $150 takes home. 
(847)223-1530. 

- SCHWINN STATIONARY 
BIKE/COMPUTER-S200. 
Precor rowing machine/com- 
puter- $200.00. Pro-Fitness 
stepper $200.00. Precor 610 
rower-$1 50.00. (847) 
295-7353 

"TREK MOUNTAIN BIKE 
800 SERIES, 2yrs. old, 50 
miles total. $450. (847) 
543-1965. 



TOYOTA MR2 1986, black, 
4-cyllnder, 5-speed, power 
steering, brakes, windows, 
locks, A/C, sunroof, In good 
shape, runs excellent, 
$l,650/best. Call Judy or 
Chuck (847) 587-1759. 

CORVETTE 1992 CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
top, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 385-8468. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



HONDA 1992 CIVIC LX 4- 
door, automatic transmission, 
A/C, all power except locks, 
cruise control, AM/FM cas- 
sette, excellent condition, 
70K, 56,000/best. (847) 
543-9558. 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking $j,500/best. (414) 652- 
7952. 

CAMARO RS 1969, V8, 5- 

speed, T-tops, charcoal gray, 
BFG'a, $3,200/best. Clean 
car. (847) 740-4090. • 

CAMRY XLE 1993, V8, 
ABS, highway miles, automat*. 
Ic everything, leather Interior, 
gold, $8,500/best. (414) 
857-3439. . 

CARS FROM $500 
Police Impounds 
AndTax Repo's. 
For listings call 

1-800-319-3323 
ext. 2292. 

CHEVROLET 1992 LUMI- 

NA, $4,995. (847) 234-2800. 

CHEVROLET 1995 GM 
SONOMA, 59,000 miles, 
$5,995. (414) 652-8430. 

CHEVY 1992 CAVALIER, 
air, power locks, ABS, 5- 
speed, good condition, 
$2,500.(847)543-8479, 

CHEVY IMPALA SS 1995, 
black, fully loaded, excellent 
condition, must sell. (414) ' 

694-9449. __ 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00, 
Bedllners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Re pari Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6184. 

CHRYSLER CIRRUS LX, 

1998. $9995. (647)587-6473 

EXPRESS AUTO 

EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We take consignment cars. 

No charge. 
Too busy to sell your car? 
Let us do It for you. - 

(847) 740-1400 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King), 

Ask for Chris. 

FORD 1991 TEMPO 4- 
door, full power, $2,250/best. ' 
FORD 1986 F-250 Super Cab 
Pickup 4x4, manual transmis- 
sion, full power, cap. 454 en- 
• fllne, S4.B50. (815) 344-1675. 

FORD 1995 MUSTANG 
COUPE, loaded, 18,600 miles, 
$11,500. (414) 605-9942. 

FORD 1995 PROBE SE 
hatchback, air, cassette, 
power windows/locks, 46K, 
white. 'Very sharpl College 
student, must sell. $9,800. 
(815) 344-5673. 

FORD TAURUS 1991 LX 
WAGON, fully loaded, leather, 
moonroof, ! 1 -owner, good 
condition, 100K. 56.500. (847) 
356-7083. ' 

GRAND PRIX 1987 fully 
loaded, 305 V8, class II hitch, 
$4,500/best. (847) 587-5901. ■ 

HYUNDAI 1997 ACCENT, 

$4.498. (847) 336-3510. 

MERCURY 1989 SABLE, 

great condition, dependable, 
many new parts, $2.450/best, 
(414) 249-8708, 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL. 1997 Black Pon- 
tlac Sunfire, 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (847)438-4180. 

NISSAN 1991 STANZA 
GXE, while, 4-door, great con- 
dition, too many extras' to list. 
(847) 746-1369 afler 5pm. 

PLYMOUTH 1991 AC- 
CLAIM, good condition, great 
runner, $2,300. (847) 
356-9384. ■_ 

SAAB 1990 9000CD black, 
4-door sedan, excellent condi- 
tion, loaded, leather Interior. 
Best offer over $5,000. (847) 
506-0038.- ■ 

TAKE OVER PAYMENTS 

1997 Monte Carlo- LS, show- 
room condition, leather, power 
windows/locks, CD, sunroof,. 
20,400 miles, $345/mo. (815) 
477-3419 6pm-10pm. ' 

VOLKSWAGON 1993 

. CORRADO SLC, black/tan, 
70K, loaded, great car. Inqui- 
ries .to Josh ® (847) 
370-4570. 



834 


Tnicks/rrallers 



WOLBERG JETTA 1999, 
perfect, 5,700 miles, has It all. . 
Automatic, power, CD, bike 
rock, custom Interior trim. Buy- 
ing VW bus for extended road 
trip. $17,990. Female own- 
er/driver, (84?) 643-1965 
leave message. 



814 


Service & Parts 


TONNEAU COVER FOR 

Ford Ranger longbed, black, 
complete kit, like new, $100. 
(815)675-3011. 


824 


Vans 



CHEVROLET 1989 HIGH 
TOP ' CONVERSION VAN, 
TV & VCR Included, excellent 
condltlon,$3,800/best. TOYO- 
TA 1986 4-RUNNER, Flori- 
da Truck, good condition, 89K, 
automatic, A/C, $3,500/bost. 
(847)740-7841. 



CHEVY 1991 S-10 PICK- 
UP, $2,990. (B15) 385-2100. 

CHEVY 1993 Z71, pickup, 
loaded, perfect condition, low 
miles, (847) 748-9004. 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
CLUB PICK-UP, $9,998. (847) 
336-3510. • 

DODGE 1995 DAKOTA 

20K MILES, $6,990. (815) 365- 
2100. 

FORD F-150 1992, 6-cylin- 
der, stick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage, 
$6.500/best. (847) 356-5949. | 

RED 1997 GMC SIERRA 

1500, ■ loaded, accessories 
cap, running boards, grill 
guard and driving lights, 
32,700 miles, S18 L 500. (414) 
539-2827. 



CHEVY 1991 

EURO, $4,495. 
3300. 



LUMINA 

(847). 587-. 



DODGE 1988 CARAVAN, 
good condition, $1,500. (414) 
551-9892. -. 

DODGE 1990 CARAVAN, 
$2.595. (847) 587-6473. 

DODGE 1991 GRAND Car- 
avan SE $4595. (847) 587- 
6473. . 

FORD 198$ WORK VAN, all 
new brakes, dual block heater, 
ladder rack, Diamond Plate 
Steel Bed, runs great, 
$3,000/best. (414) 889-8940. 

NISSAN 1996 QUEST MINI- 
VAN, $14,995. (847) 234- 
2800. 

PLYMOUTH 1992 GRAND 
VOYAGER LE, $5,995. (847) 
234-2800. 

PLYMOUTH 1992 VOYAG- 
ER, $3,995. (847) 395-3600. 

PLYMOUTH -1993 VOYAG- 
ER, $4,500/best. (414) 
279-6370 after 5pm. 

PONTIAC 1995 TRANS- 
PORT 59995. (847)587-6473 

VW- EUROVAN 1993, 
$8,995. (847) 249-1300. 



828 



Four Wheel Drire 
-' Jeeps 



ISUZU AMIGO 1993, fully 
loaded, $5.500/best. (847) 
973-0128 or voice mall 1-800- 
255-4859 ext.46B9. 

JEEP '93 GRAND' Chero- 
kee, 4 x 4 cd, 78k, mint, 6 cy- 
linder. $10,900/obo. (773) 
782-0757 

JEEP 1995 CHEROKEE 
SPORT, $10,995. (847) 360- 
5000. 

JEEP COMANCHE 1989 
2x4, 140K miles, 5-speed, 
bedliner, snap-on bed cover, 
new tires, excellent condition 
and runner, $3,300. (414) 
534-6548. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1995, 
$10,395. (847) 587-6473. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1997 
4X4 SE, $12,995. (847) 360- 
5000. ' 

TOYOTA 1991 4-RUNNER 
SR5, V6, gold, great condition, 
1 -owner, automatic, air, 
. $8,750. (414) 275-5819. 



844 



Motorcycles 



1997 SUZUKI 1400 IN- 
TRUDER, with cover, helmets 
and shield, 480 miles, 
$6,500/flrm. (847) 785-8843. 

HONDA 750 NIGHTHAWK 
1995, black, like new condi- 
tion, garage' kept, ridden only 
2 seasons, 4,000 miles, 
$5,800 new, selling $3,600. 
(847) 548-0409. 

MOTORCYCLE 1992 

CBR600F2, $2,000/best. 

(B47) 265-7356. 



S21 


Dry Wall 



PAINTING, DRYWALL 

AND OLD FASHION 
PLASTER REPAIR, 15yrs. 
experience, insured, senior 
discount. (414) 652-3220. 



S33 


Handyman * 



HOUSECLEANING SERV- 
ICES 5YRS. experience, dal- 
ly, weekly, bi-weekly. Refer-' 
ences. Call for appointment. 
(414) 889-8513. 

THE HANDYMAN NO Job, 
too small. Painting, carpentry | 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(847) 223-7724. 



S39 


Housekeeping 



HOUSE CLEANING REA- 
SONABLE RATES, weekly, 
bi-weekly, monthly. Free esti- 
mates. Call us (847)' 
546-6018. ■ 

LET US DO IT FOR YOU 

Dependable, reliable. Weekly, 
bl-wekly. Call Sue (847) 
587-8486. 

MORAVIA 
CLEANING SERVICE. 

House cleaning 

Window cleaning. 

References available. 

Quality work at low cost. 

(647) 623-4943. 



S78 


Remodeling 



DC TILE WE Install floor and 
wall tiles of all kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (847) 395- 
0777. 



■SB"*'- 'mm ii U 



Februaty, 1999 j 



x 




February 12, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C21 




Send in your coloring 
contest entnr today to try to win 
free movie passes to Regal Cinemas! 



» ,a«. e*« :.n*BOu^ mam* 

'& Yodng At Heart Intergenerational 
J Ppe-Schod/Dajjcare J 

g First on-site intergenerational program in an f 

a extended care facility In the state of Illinois: fg 

rij Serving children ages 6 wks.-6 yrs, - tm 

II We invite you to tour our unique facility, ^ 

ft 610 Peterson Rd. • Libertyville ft 

q (8Y7) 367-6110 1 



wfiA- • Valentine's Day Balloons ' 

• Balloon Gift Stuffings 
N • Flowers 

' • Stuffed Animals & Parity Roses 

• Gift Baskets 



:i 



if Special combo package prices with 
■singing telegrams! 

Amazing Balloons & Decor 

(847) 872-3356 




FREE 
LOCAL 



c.opGffiqg 



I 



* r AZK - n * 

<T j * 5th Anniversary Special* j <J 

" j Purchase 1 pluyTIME at regular price j ^ 



in^^ica ajfwii 




piimntirw 

Jlet 'sSPrtiitnf * 
mam 




^_j & receive 2nd one at 1/2 price 



Hours: 1 1 o.rn. - 6 p.m. 

by appoinlmenl 

(Closed Tuesdays) 



469 N. Lake St., Mundotein, IL 

(847) 566-6900 



i 



••••••••••••••••••••rr, " 

* Valentine Coloring Contest Winners *|Name__ 

will receive complimentary movie * j Age. 

passes at our new... * j Address 

EGAL J [City ! 

*:Zip 



* 

• 
• 
• 

• 
• 



CINEMAS 



•*■■■"■■»■*■•* ^-^f ^ i Phone 

On Rollins Rd. between Route 83 and it I 

Pedar Lake Rd., Round Lake Beach, "k I 

All Stadium Seating. * I 

IT'S MORE THAN A MOVIE ™ *l 

www.regalcinemas.com * I 







Great Clips 
— for hair. 



V 



1427 Peterson Rd. 
Libertyville 



823 Center St. 

(PlgalyWIggty Plata). 

Grayslake 



(847) 573-1951 (847) 548-4084 





Saturn of 
Waukegan 



500 S. Green Bay Road 
847-360-5000 

Soon to be Saturn of 
Gurnee Mills 






State 



Send to: Coloring Contest 

c/o Classified Department 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



Contest Rules 

l.This contest is open to children in three age groups:. 
( 4-6 years) (7-8 years) ( 8-10 years). 

2. All entries will be drawn on Feb. 24. 1 999. 

3. Paints, watercotors, marker or crayon may be used. 

4. Free movie passes to Regal.Cinemas (Round Lake) 
will be awarded to the winners in each age group. 

5. The decisions of the judges will be final. 

6. Winners will be published on March 2 In The 
Market Journal and March S in Lakeland Newspapers. 



UT 




bl C * 



GLENN & SONS AUTOMOTIVE, INC 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE - DOMESTIC & IMPORTS 

19170 VW ROUTE 137, LIBERTYVILLE. IL 60048 

(Jusi West ol Rl. 45. Noxl lo Doe's Motel) 

847-362-2886 




: ■ $m . -NOW : 

i Brt-tf€> ENROLLING, : 

Z Bsslmrfna*^ Cuius . Rvns : 



Cft K"«o"K I'Wnr 




/*>■ ; 






*. J * 




From the staff of 
Lakeland Publishers 






V""" i ' • 



■&m&®&£ 






( 



...• - 



, J V 







J A Program of Central Baptist Children's Home. J 

v * Omit? in for a tour and n-reive a free copy of _ v 

V "Caring For Your Baby & Yiitui$ Child" v 

* * Ennili before April 1st - S50 resist ration fee waived * 

v 215 N.Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60046 ■* 

Z 847-356-4112 Z 




tfWjr.Tis' 



E^Ei-jiv^ 



jaasssKEastsa 




Casey Services, Inc. 



Since 1975 

Staffing Solutions for Accounting, 
Finance and Information Systems 

1 580 S. Milwaukee Ave. (847)573-1 500 

Suite 204 Fax (847)573-1520 

Libertyville, Illinois 60048 

e-mail: catnorth@caseysta()ing.corh 
Visit our website: www.caseystafllrig.com 




'- 



:, 



/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 12, 1999 



I 



:> 






- 






, 



v- ■■ * 






^ 



AX DIRECTORY 



ATCWEGGE,LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

IRS Representation 

Established. Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

CARL SAND 
ACCOUNTING & INCOME TAX 

E- FILE available 

404 Lake St • Antioch 

. (847) 395-7444 

COMPREHENSIVE 
ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free Electronic Filing w/pd. return 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847) 223-4040 

COTE & WRIGHT 

Servicing Lake County for over 30 years 

1304 Washington St. • Waukegan 
(847) 662-6019 • fax (847) 662-6053 

DAM, SNELL & TAVEIRNE, LTD. 

Certified Public Accountants 

Internet Address: dstcpa. com 

21 Rollins Rd. • Fox Lake 

(847) 587-3022 
1512 Artaius Parkway • Liberty ville 

(847) 367-4448 
2011 S. Route 31 • McHenry 

(847) 587-3022 

THOMAS L. KRON, CPA 

Individual & Business Taxes 

Appointments available at 

your convenience 

1724 E. Grand Ave. • Lindenhurst 

(847) 265-0866 



HaR BLOCK 

474B W. Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 

2 W. Grand • Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 

426 Lake • Antioch 

(847)395-6230 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 



« 



" JACKSON HEWITT 

-!_-_-«— Tr.H SERVICE 

23 South Route 12 • Fox Lake 

(847)973-1099 

226 N. Bairon Blvd. • Grayslake 

(847)548-6060 

46 West Main St. • Lake Zurich 

(847)726-1099 

622 E. Hawley • Mundelein 

(847)949-8433 

2435 Green Bay Road • North Chicago 

(847)689-1099 
23 West Rollins Road • Round Lake Beach 

(847)740-1099 

336 S. Green Bay Road* Waukegan 

(847)360-1099 

2250 Sheridan Road • Zion 

(847)746-1099 

CALL 1-800-234-1040 

FOR OTHER LOCATIONS. 

IERROLD I. WEINSTEIN 

Income Tax Preparation 
(Electronic Filing Available) 
Small Business Accounting - 

Payroll Service 

4949 Grand.Ave: • Gurrfee 

(847) 662-3420 

If you Avould like your company to be 

added tojLakeland's Tax Directory, 

please ca» Paula or Ross at 847-223-8161 



Jerry! 

Happy-goLucky 

days are the ones 

I spend with you. 

Happy 

Valentine's Day! 

All my Love, 

Paula 





Happy Valentine's 
Day to all my 
great friends 
& co-workers 
who have been 
so loving and 
supportive. 

mm 







wmm—mm*mmmmmm 

[rfie're very pro it A 
efr.ym. 

\rpe (five yon 

very much. 

y/ldvnys stay true 

to yettrseCf 




Victor Mi Amorci 

to tequiero 

mucho. Espero 

clifrutar este dia - 

contigo tu-esposa 

que te ama y 
tedecea mucho. 
(Ztigic 





~(bammij>, 



You aiul the baby are the 

besi limits ihat have ever 

happened in me und I low 

you hutli veeeerrrrry imieh! 



^HAPpy 

VALENTINE'S 

DAy 

HANNAH 

MOMMy^ 
AND f|& 
DADDy *? 
-^ LOVE 

$$ youm 





Mema, 

jj* I love you 
very muclr 
And 
Tuxedo 
Is a 
Loml. 



jj-;-^.— ;. . . .-■ ■ r—'iju 



Paul <S Mary 

You children are the 

greatest gift God ever 

bestowed on me, 

though sometimes 

we've had hassles. 

Love for you will 

; . always be, 

BE MY VALENTINES! 

Love,, m. 
Mom 




Jason, 

I hope that' you 

will, be my 

Valentine 

forever and 

always, 

Love with all 

my: heart, 

Michelle 



Happy Valentine's 

Day Grace, 

I Love Yon Very, 

Much! 

Love Always, 

Mommy 




it£&y* Zhou* 

^^STm Tnank 

W8& you for 
l *j^? all you do 
Forme, . 
your kindness & 

sincerity. 
Prom Uie moment 

I met you, 

1 knew there was - 

something special 

between us. I Love 

You for being you. 



Waftfxt 
l/cxtentine* & *Da<t 

MAUREEN 



''torn: 



fanet, Wide, 
7)att & Ctate 



4P You're my knight 
g In shining armor. 
£ Roses are Red. 
Violets are Blue, 
It's been great 9 
Loving You. J 

Patti C. J 



^flllHtlf' — 

Near or far. lieur or far, 

I tim happy 

where you arc... 

Ml V 111 >l (*■■. Jill l « i.< «,!«!» V. 

«nlr |.nl ).,< l-m,i il.^sK-jji- - 
H.lhl'IVil1',|ir - !' I..lj- iwr.i l|» ' 

I Urn - VAULvasi-'s Day 

1 .1 ni' idviVOX h 1 null' 



}?>' Ricky, 

l Love You 
from 

'h~-> die first very 
ijgffif memorable kiss, 
to the crazy & 
adorable Tarzan. 
Don't ever stop 
being yon! 
Be my ■ 
sweetheart forever! 
All my love, 
'Av". Love. 



Lucy 



ff 






f: To Michael V. X 

We've been thru so 

much, but no matter 

what, we always find 

happiness. You are the 

love of my life, 
Happy Valentine 's Day! 

Love, 
&& r^ ^\Kaihy'V. 

Vm, 



^ Dear Snarl. 

(J 

X Thank yiiti far the 

p« beautiful person 

(i that. you are and 

'■$ for in a kin a all .my 

ty (I renins voine true. 

You're the best!!.' 

I Love You, 

Space 

xoxaxdxo 




Jlappi/ Vattatine't. Stay! * 

To My Angels ; 

Mark & Angle. * 

I'm so thankful to have « 

you! t don't know what : 

I would do without you.; 

Thank you for all • 

you've done for me. • 

Thank you ; 

for being there! ; 

I Love You, : 

Mom : 

» 









\- , 




,Happy Valentine's Day ' 
to my. Ilflfe pumpkin pie" 

HALEY MARIE 

Lots ofjttsses 6n8.f]ugs 

)Qs cJLO'ite (gfou 

\ MISS MELQpi'8| BRUTUS 



You are a gift 
of love from 
? God. I am so 
blessed I 






jMLlDEn 




a 
















February 12, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C23 







Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To Place 
Your Ad Here 

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Pet Clean-Up Service 

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M7-22M1611 



DECKS PLUS 

• CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 
• Custom Decks 

•Porches- 'Room Additions . 
•Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms - Kitchens 
•Custom Carpenliy 
■Improvements & Repairs! 
INCUSED O BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATE* 

(414) 889-44; 

Pleis* Call Guy Korkiu 




■ : .-" * ■' ■ ' 



Complete Small Engine 
Repair Service 

• Tune-Ups • Repair 
♦ Overhaul 

Offering prompt, courteous service on 
your 2-cycle or 4-cycle engine. 
Welding also available . 

S.E.M.C.Q. 

U23 nI'OAAi*.. Round Uk«.B«ih.a. 

847-740-3729 



■Tlie holistic approach to good health 
STOP SMOKING - LOSE WEIGHT 
Stop irrational fears -manage stress - 
focus your life 
FREE CONSULTATION 
■ 77ie one-time therapy that works 
CALL THE CENTER FOR HABIT CONTROL 
128 NEWBERRY AVE. Rm 8 
UBERTYVILLE.IL 
847-8164951 
DAVID E WOLD clfl Matter Hypnotist 



J&K'S 

WOOD YARD 
BLOWOUT 

PREMIUM HARDWOODS 

1 FACE CORD $65 

2 FACE CORDS $120 

GUARANTEED QUALITY 

& QUANTITY 

847 438-6129 (JASON) 
PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 

% 847 550-0943 ( WILLIAM) 

A PAGER ff 708644-1645 



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fBUecl titxk 
^Medical (Uaim* iBUlittg. 

Slgnltlcantly livreise pur monthly c«h 
How payment turn around tlnif, 7-ia oiyi. 

. Diitct electronic cUliw wUnUik»lo NEtC«Nrt»«k 
orPiytn.tMlu'lini AttmlnbUr,Artn«,rUiikmUr«, 
rW.I Trial, BOBS, Ch.mpus. Otw, ^>*™. 
G rt*t Wtsi, lluiran*, Mrilrtrt, Mtdk»U, MrtUT*. 
' prudtnlUI. md nuny Uhtn. 

• Complete »DJjysl» ot CtT »»I ICD-9 antes. 

• Aoilyitt Report* & FuDrtiooil Rcp«Uii|. 

Call Electronic Claims Services 
Todayl 847-265-5575 




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ms(Bwms3 

CaihFor 

■ • Aluminum Cans 
• All Other Scrap Metals 
Industrial Accounts Welcome 

CHICAGO SURPLUS 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor, Wl.' 

location: Tievof. Wl l mile west ot JK jfti p. Turn 

Notlh on 2591h St. veer 1o te» 2 blocks 

Mon.-Frl. 9:00am - 5pm 

Saturday 9:00am • 3pm 

closed 12- J for lunch 

(414) 662-2517 




lower your ELEOTB.C BILL .hhoar ENEHOJM PEBFORMANCEsimrlCB 

HEATWAVE (^E) 

Hoating M Air Conditioning 

(847) 740-4127 

Fax (847) ,546-0855 
We Service All Makes & Models 
Fully Licensed & Insured 
All Work Guaranteed 



Wo accept All Major 
Credit Carda 




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EZ23 



COUPON, 



PRE-SEASON SPECIAL 

I PRECISION FURNACE 
TUNE-UP 

WITH THIS COUPON 




THOMAS 
CLEANING^ 

- SNOW REMOVAL * 

X off Roofs, Gutters & Downspouts * 
5 ANY SIZE HOUSE- ANY ROOF * 
^Ht We also do window c/eajiinglg. 
igL & power washing #jp 

W FREE ESTIMATE S 

^T Insured & Bonded 

(847) 404-3398 






j New Ideas Daily. 

Ad Campaigns, 

logo Design, 

Identity Pieces for 

Communicating in 

the New Millennium. 

harbinger's 

Graphic Art& Design 

(847) 265-0986 



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Kitchen-Bath-Basement 
Custom Remodeling 

Quality work at affordable prices 
SPECIAL ON BASEMENTS NOW 

■(mention this ad) 

Free Estimates 



IHMIH I * * 




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Landmark 



§ tES' 847-548-5110. 

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AT DISCOUNT PRICES 

LOWMINIMUMS 
PICK-UP/DELIVERY AVAILABLE 
PUT YOUR PHOTOS ON YOUR FLIERS 
& BIRTHDAY INVITATIONS 
BW ALSO AVAILABLE 

IK ENTERPRISES 
.847-721-6004 or 
847-838-6003 
(wnail IKEBJSEMAfiLPOia 



Aii Illinois Mortgage Banker 

• Refinancing . • Debt Consolidation 

• Home Improvement • NIV Loans 

• Purchase • Equity Credtt Line 

CALL MIKE WINGO Today 

(630) 424-9512' fg*| 



JLakaOnLlnel 

•Lake Counl/s Hot Spoi on the WWWl' 

www.lako-online.com 



Pxod*c«d fy th* 4&-*£ Winning 



literiet Studio 
WMW.theistudio.eom 

We Cater to the 
Techno-Challengedl ;-) 

From Secure Web Stores to Roaperoira Web 
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Included with EwrySltaWa Produce: 

- Internet Marketing Semioir -. 

- Monthly WWW MariwSng Nevwletter - 

Free Link In UKe Onllne'a Market 

Place with 12,000 Visitors Per Monthl 



Choose Your Online Partners Wuely: 
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847-395-9115 

'39tlikt Strut Downtown Antlfleh 



FANTASTIC FIREW009 

OAK, ASH, MAPLE, CHERRY S6SJC) 
100% OAK $75 (FC) 
(847)546-3613 

(815)344-9522 
I-80IK430-6262J 



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"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service' 
33265 N.Rte. 45 ^ 
Wildwood, IL 60030 
(847)223-4682 
RESIDENTIAL -C0MMEBC1AL 




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C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 12, 1999 



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? U3S (W) MOTOROLA SSn FLIP PHONE* 
FIRST 3ft MINUTES OF LOCAL AIRTIME INCLUDED* 









COMPLETE PACKAGE! 



ONLY 





9.95 



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Round Lake Beach 

(847) 543-0664 
960 East Rollins Road 

(across from Blockbuster Video) 



The easiest, most convenient 
way to get cellular phone service. 



^PICKUP 8) GO 



Gurnee 
(847)599-8858 
Highland Park 3563 Grand Avenue 

(847) 432-0026 l across from Ethan A " en Furniture ) 
1393 Half Day Road 

(corner of Rt. 41 & Rt. 22) 

. . i . .l i v : "* 1 "i o!,l 1 i_ s. r<. Tniinlnr urvlce It non-refundable. Not responsible for loss, theft, or unauthorized use of 

*E(|l<lpment is refurbished. See store for details. 



^Affiefitech 

Authorized Cellular Dealer 



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